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Thread: Need casters that work well on rough concrete

  1. #1
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    Need casters that work well on rough concrete

    What type of casters work well on rough concrete? It looks like the finished the concrete with a dead chicken. I tried soft rubber economy casters and those didn't work out.

    Should I buy hard plastic, hard rubber, pneumatic, ...?

    This is for a drum sander that weighs about 300 pounds.

  2. #2
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    I think increasing the size of the wheels will be more effective than changing material. Larger wheels will roll over rough surfaces more easily.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  3. #3
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    I have a Powermatic 66 on steel wheels. Those wheels are chipping the concrete at the stress relief kerfs. The 4" hard plastic wheels on the lumber carts seem to do OK.

  4. #4
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    Call Caster Depot and ask them what to use.
    https://www.casterdepot.com/contact/...www.google.com

    They used to be Great Lakes Casters. A really fine place to deal with. I've had excellent luck/service/prices with them.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Franklin View Post
    I think increasing the size of the wheels will be more effective than changing material. Larger wheels will roll over rough surfaces more easily.
    +1. That's what I was thinking too.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  6. #6
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    As large a wheel diameter as practical. Urethane or rubber tires.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  7. #7
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    I recently built a welder cart with these. They roll Very easily, and go over extension cords on the floor with little problem.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    Larger wheels with urethane or rubber tires as Rob mentions is the way to go. There is no long-term redeeming value in "cheap" casters, either. Buy quality and that doesn't necessarily mean "most expensive". Just avoid the bargain stuff that's cheaply made. These things need to support weight and your precious tools. It's an important job! I've been very pleased with castercity.com for solutions I've bought from them.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Larger wheels with urethane or rubber tires as Rob mentions is the way to go. There is no long-term redeeming value in "cheap" casters, either. Buy quality and that doesn't necessarily mean "most expensive". Just avoid the bargain stuff that's cheaply made. These things need to support weight and your precious tools. It's an important job! I've been very pleased with castercity.com for solutions I've bought from them.
    Agreed Jim. Conversely, I'd like to think there is long-term redeeming value in high quality casters. In my experience they generally outlast whatever they're bolted to and get to be used on multiple applications. I have some that have been used on at least a couple different carts and mobile stands in my shop.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  10. #10
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    Yea, I've actually reused some sets myself, Rob. Good quality just keeps on giving!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
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    Agree on larger diameter and agree on higher quality. I have several sets of 3" casters that have survived a couple of house moves along with their daily requirements. I have lesser casters that have self destructed on smooth concrete. I do have cast iron wheels on a few heavier items but, they are not rough-stuff friendly.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    I recently built a welder cart with these. They roll Very easily, and go over extension cords on the floor with little problem.
    Frayed, that sounds dis- cord-ant to that cord ! ....just a PLUG for keeping the juice flowing
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 06-10-2021 at 9:28 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  13. #13
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    quality is sometimes in the eye of the beholder. I WOULD have thought powermatic put quality casters on their PM2000, but I had two of four disintegrate in just a few years. I replaced with similar from another company, and so far they have held up twice as long. (or longer actually) Over really rough concrete, nothing will be great. But good soft will probably hold up well. Urethane should be best.
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  14. #14

    Roadie Casters

    I work in the concert industry...all those cases you see filled with cables and such. They roll on 4" thermoplastic swivel casters like these https://casterconnection.com/blog/ro...ter-connection





    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Bukovec View Post
    What type of casters work well on rough concrete? It looks like the finished the concrete with a dead chicken. I tried soft rubber economy casters and those didn't work out.

    Should I buy hard plastic, hard rubber, pneumatic, ...?

    This is for a drum sander that weighs about 300 pounds.

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