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Thread: New Workshop: What to consider first!

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,669
    I was told by my HVAC installer that the dehumidification settings on mini-splits (at least my Mitsubishi) really don't work very well and I would be better served by keeping the unit on the AC settings. FWIW.

    You might be surprised about getting solar despite your HOAs limitations. I love having a solar house. 30kWh in my case, so a beast. Nothing like not paying electric bills - even with a big workshop with big machines and 3-phase power.

    A lot to be said for getting yourself on the HOA board too to tailor the conversations and the agenda. It's hard to fight against solar these days. Unless you're the electric utility. They are slime in this regard.

    Oh, and ceiling hoists are awesome. I have 3 in my present shop, in chosen locations. They aren't expensive and they are incredibly helpful. I actually thought about having a bridge crane installed in my shop, but the quotes got crazy expensive. Hoists (either the HF one, or better the ones from Northern Tool) really aren't expensive and save your back.

    And having a finishing room with an explosion proof fan really opens up possibilities for finishing your projects. I love having one.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,348
    There are some newer solar solutions that effectively "look like the roof" which may be very helpful when someone unfortunately lives in an HOA or similar.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,811
    An alternative to an overhead hoist (which can really clutter up your layout) would be to rent an engine hoist on those few days you need it.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    N. Idaho
    Posts
    1,175
    Get lots of lights. And then get some more!
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Black Oak Ark.
    Posts
    179
    24 x 30 is about what I have . It really fills up fast , even with the best of planning . YouTube shop tours are good for ideas , ways to do things you may not have considered . Try to remove everything not shop related - kids bikes , lawn care stuff , etc.. -all of it ! Good luck with your build , and enjoy yourself .

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    El Dorado Hills, CA, USA
    Posts
    193
    For that garage door, I'd suggest using a jack lift opener (see Liftmaster). You can roll the door up within inches of the 10' ceiling, and you don't have a rail down the center of the garage getting in the way. It will make the space feel much more open.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,348
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mills View Post
    For that garage door, I'd suggest using a jack lift opener (see Liftmaster). You can roll the door up within inches of the 10' ceiling, and you don't have a rail down the center of the garage getting in the way. It will make the space feel much more open.
    I will agree with this...I just had a Liftmaster jack-shaft opener installed on the big garage door of my "temporary shop" (some folks call it a garage... ) and it's super-quiet, super-smart and takes up zero ceiling space. If I put a garage type door in my new shop, i'll be looking to get the more vertical orientation when it's opened, too, like you suggest.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,669
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I will agree with this...I just had a Liftmaster jack-shaft opener installed on the big garage door of my "temporary shop" (some folks call it a garage... ) and it's super-quiet, super-smart and takes up zero ceiling space. If I put a garage type door in my new shop, i'll be looking to get the more vertical orientation when it's opened, too, like you suggest.
    I had one in my last house too. It was great. The battery backup option is also nice if your area is prone to power outages.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    325
    Re headroom. In my 40 x 30’ shop half of it is 10’ headroom, over the machine area. In the other half, where I build boats I used scissor trusses to get more headroom. Wish I had done the entire shop with them.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,348
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    I had one in my last house too. It was great. The battery backup option is also nice if your area is prone to power outages.
    Yea, it has battery backup plus control and notifications from our smartphones. While it's not literally tied into our RING security system, it's cooperative and one can jump between the apps quite easily. The unit is about $200 more (installed) than the "regular", center of the ceiling type, but IMHO, worth that extra cost to get it out of the way and to remove the additional source of noise. I got the permanent outlet up for the unit two days ago so everything is really clean now in the gara...err...shop.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    489
    Congrats on the new shop!!

    A bit redundant but here's my recs:

    -Build as big as possible
    -10' ceilings and consider open gable and engineer for storage overhead and hoist "hanging"-- I use a chain fall infrequently but easy access is a good thing--2nd story????
    -plan for sheet goods and offcut storage--I save way too much "stuff"
    -attached DC and compressor shed
    -if you don't have a dust extractor consider a built in system for easy use--fine particulates are pervasive
    -bathroom and utility sink
    -I have 125 amps and is plenty for hobby with mig, tig, and plasma cutter--if bringing power from house main panel bury extra conduit--future internet etc.
    -slab radiant is the best for heat but doesn't address your humidity/AC needs--not needed out here in PNW-
    -windows are great but limit wall hanging space
    -if planning a workbench mounted SCMS consider depth needed for most saws-mine needs 32" depth and makes reaching hanging tools a "stretch"--could be a girth issue!! DC for SCMC is a challenge
    and may be good to consider in design plan
    -I made carriage style doors for the 8'w x 9'h doors and 32" man door

    Have fun with your new shop

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