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Thread: Help needed with router template/ bushing

  1. #1
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    Help needed with router template/ bushing

    Im building a small cabinet and decided to use SOSS 101 hinges. They require the use of a template (SOSS 101-IT), a router, and a bushing. The best instructions I could find are here.

    I use a router almost never.

    The instructions say to use only a specific Porter Cable bushing. I own two routers, both about 20 years old. Both are very large plunge routers - a Bosch and a Ryobi.

    Can I use a Porter Cable bushing on these routers? Do I need something additional to be able to attach it?

    Are these routers too big for this small job? Should I get a trim router?

    Thanks, David

  2. #2
    What do I know? I've never installed them and am no expert in router bushings, so take this with a grain of salt. The only reason I can see for using a specific bushing are to ensure that the projection of the bushing is sufficient to catch the guide pins when routing the deeper mortise.

    The instructions suggest making a test in any case, so you can try one of your existing routers with a " bushing and see what the results are.

    As to buying a smaller router, I'd be all for the excuse to buy a new tool but it is clear you don't use a router hardly ever, so what's the point? An alternative if you find your large routers to be unwieldy would be to rent a smaller router. Home Depot seems to rent a bunch of small tools -- that might be a reasonable approach.

    Mike

  3. #3
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    PC (Porter Cable) guide bushings are considered the defacto standard. Porter Cable, DeWalt, Milwaukee - and a few others will generally accept them without needed some sort of converter.
    My DeWalt 611pk compact takes the PC bushings but - my Makita cordless plunge bas needs an adapter. ($8 item that screws on)

    Without knowing for sure what models you have, I'd say your best bet would be something like this:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milescra...1201/202241651
    This is a universal adapter that fits most bases.
    You can see how to use it by watching this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPuBJ10Xjzk

    To see just how guide bushings work - check out this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnqP3qVjCLY

    As an aside - guide bushings are really, really, really cool. You can do a whole lot of neat stuff with them. Once you use them a time or two, you'll wonder why it took you so long to find out about them.
    Last edited by Rich Engelhardt; 06-06-2021 at 4:37 PM.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  4. #4
    The important factor is that your bushing and your bit have the correct differential of diameters. A .25" bit with a .5" bushing cuts the same hole as a .5" bit with a .75" bushing. The dimension of your mortise will be equal to the dimension of the template minus the bushing/bit differential.

  5. #5
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    Most likely you'll need to use a 5/8" bushing with a 3/8" bit. A plunge cut router should work but I've always used a fixed base. The key with the plunge cut it how much play there is as you want the bit centered in the bushing without any movement. The Porter Cable bushing is 1 3/16" in diameter with a 1 3/8" flange on it. The hole in your router base should be 1 3/16" with a groove that the 1 3/8" flange will fit into making it flush with the bottom of the router place. You can find a set of Porter Cable style brass bushings on ebay and Amazon for cheap. You'll also want a tool to center it, which may or may not come with the bushing set. It looks like a cone on a 1/4" rod.

  6. #6
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    Even Harbor Freight sells a set of brass bushings.
    Bill D

  7. #7
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    I think Rockler and others sell an adaptor kit to use PC bushings for a Bosch Colt router. I've used the kit but I dont remember details or whether I needed a plate for the router.

    edit - I just looked at Rockler and dont see it there, but maybe worth checking around.
    Last edited by Stan Calow; 06-07-2021 at 1:07 PM.
    Hobbyist

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the advice. I've been piddling around the net and think I've figured things out. My old 3hp Ryobi plunge router does take the Porter Cable type bushings. I've settled on using the Soss 101 hinges. I'm sort of committed at this point. I'm spending about $100 for the hinges, hinge template, router bit, and a set of router bushings. I'm okay with that because, unless they turn out to be a hassle to install, Soss 101 hinges will be fine for just about anything I do in the future. They would be a nice alternative to Euro hinges which are huge in comparison. Also, the bushings may open up a new world for me as I find more uses for them.

    I'll update when I actually get and use everything.

    David

  9. #9
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    Bushings work nice for template use. I've made quite a few templates for things like hinges. With a bushing you can set the depth of the bit independent of the bushing (unlike a bearing on a bit). The last time I did was for some quadrant hinges for some jewelry boxes. I set the template up so I could mortise both hinges at the same time. I did the box first and then the lid so they were equal distant apart and would operate smoothly.

  10. #10
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    I'm spending about $100 for the hinges, hinge template, router bit, and a set of router bushings.
    Make sure you center your router's baseplate. Pick up a centering pin/bushing along with the bushings - also called a centering cone. It only takes a second to make sure the bit is dead center.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    Make sure you center your router's baseplate. Pick up a centering pin/bushing along with the bushings - also called a centering cone. It only takes a second to make sure the bit is dead center.
    I was thinking that, if I need a cone, it would be easy enough to drill a 1/4 bit into a block of wood, mount the bit on the lathe and turn a cone.

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