Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: 12" chainsaw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,595
    Blog Entries
    1

    12" chainsaw

    I have one from Home Depot. It is a 20volt battery powered tool. I had to buy more chain oil today.

    It will cut a 8 to 10 inch branches in a heart beat. We have 20+ trees in our yard and I use it to cut fallen branches.

    I have no issues with the toy I mean tool. If you need a new toy, I mean tool, check it out.
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 05-31-2021 at 5:13 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,483
    I Have a similar sized Stihl electric saw, yes they work great for home yard work............Regards, Rod.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,328
    I have a 10" battery operated one (Bauer) to compliment my Stihl Farm Boss gas chain saw and a Remington electric chain saw. I "inherited" a small gas powered Ryobi pole-chain saw with the new house, but I have not tried to fire it up yet. The little 10" battery operated one is great for small limbing and trimming where lopers struggle, but it's not something for any kind of serious cutting, IMHO. The best little chain saw I've ever used was a 10" or so Stihl gas powered limb/trim saw that a guy that was helping me fell a tree behind my shop had conveniently tucked in his truck. That little thing was sweet.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    I Have a similar sized Stihl electric saw, yes they work great for home yard work............Regards, Rod.
    Bought my dad an MSE 250 for X-Mas a few years ago, very surprised at how powerful it is. Been a great little saw, would recommend it to anyone that doesn’t need to go beyond the reach of a heavyweight extension cord.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,595
    Blog Entries
    1
    The difference between a man and a boy is the price of his toys.

  6. #6
    I've got two MS661CM saws as my main saws, and an MS250 for smaller duties. For the 661 saws, I have bars in 32", 36", and 56" for milling, along with a granberg 56" mill with a winch and auxiliary oiler.

    I plan on getting an MS261CM to replace the MS250 that I've had for over a decade now. I may also get an MS462 (I wish I could justify the 500i!) in the future as well, but having the two 661 saws takes care of any mid to large size cutting that I would need to do. I purchased the second 661 so that I could keep one mounted in the mill, and still buck with a big saw, it provides me with a backup to the saw on the mill, and it will also allow me to get a larger double headed bar in the future if I want to go really wide. I've even been thinking about trying a farmeterc G660 kit so that I can learn more about how they are constructed and understand the parts.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,328
    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    The difference between a man and a boy is the price of his toys.
    You obviously haven't priced a current generation XBox, have you?
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    899
    Never needs recharging

    saw.jpg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,777
    Since I already had a bunch of Makita batteries, I went with a Makita top handled, single battery model. It seems like a toy in hand, but it's a Handy thing to have. I use it for climbing, up in a lift bucket, and carry it in the toolbox on the truck. As with any chainsaw, keeping the chain sharp is the most important thing, and I haven't found one that won't melt right down through wood with a sharp chain.

    The largest thing I've cut with it was an 8" Red Oak limb. You wouldn't want to do that much, but I was up in the lift bucket, had to reach with one arm, and don't need/want/have a gas powered top handled saw. It cut it, but did take a whole battery charge with a 5 ah battery.

    It'll zip small limbs right off.

    The best thing about a battery powered saw is that they are easy to start.

    Next to a circular saw for size comparison.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Bloomington, IL
    Posts
    6,004
    Makita lxt chainsaw is on my list. Ill prob go 36V/two 18V batt version though.

    I did get the 18V makita grease gun this month though!!
    Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2,204

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2,204

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Eastern Iowa
    Posts
    640
    I always wear my ppe when using my chainsaw. I just replaced my chaps last year. I noticed a disclaimer that it was not for use with electric chainsaws. What do you use? Is there an electric saw approved set of chaps?
    Comments made here are my own and, according to my children, do not reflect the opinions of any other person... anywhere, anytime.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,574
    Corded electric pole saw from Harbor Freight. I have a gas powered Stihl with 16" bar but haven't needed it for years. Pole saw gets used once or twice a year.

  15. #15
    I don't think there are cordless chainsaw chaps and I suspect there do not need to be. Their chain is thinner and I think that makes somebody wonder about the chaps ability to stall the chain quickly but I am confident they still provide protection. It is not just cordless saws that have thinner chains.

    I have a 14 inch 40V Ryobi. I got it because I already had several Ryobi 40V batteries and I had a neighbors tree across my driveway one Sunday morning. I found my old gas chain saw needed a carberator rebuild and just got the cordless instead. I've since used it to cut through the trunk of a pine that took out electricity to my neighborhood briefly. It was about 12 inches in diameter. It cuts bigger things well but it drains batteries quickly. Most recently I used it to help out a fellow airgunner make a berm. It worked better than his gas saw cutting off limbs once the tree was down. I also unstuck a big 36 inch saw by cutting through the trunk of a large tree, probably around 24 inches, from both sides. I did the same thing again so we could move a tree trunk. I think the guys with the gas saws need to learn to sharpen their chains but my little battery saw worked well. I drained 3 batteries completely and had a fourth pretty well drained when we quit, however. It's really nice not to have to worry about having mixed gas around and not gummed up and all the other little things that it takes to make a 2 cycle motor run. I would not say a battery saw is a complete replacement for a gas powered one but for smaller tasks mine works great.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •