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Thread: Table Saw Sleds - comparison

  1. #1

    Table Saw Sleds - comparison

    I will be purchasing a commercial table saw sled, specifically 1) The Dubby or 2) Rockler's version. I would greatly appreciate the opinions (pros & cons) from folks who have use either one or both. Price or DIY not a consideration. Thank you, Vince

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    What are you trying to get from the sled?

    My most important sled is a homemade sled for 90deg crosscuts, where there is value in fence on both sides of the cut (depending on how I want to control crosscut lengths) and the zero-clearance kerfs in the base and back fence for cleaner cuts.

    Getting the sled dialed in to run straight in your miter slots without slop is very important. I prefer the 2-runner sleds for this.

    For 45 miters, I'd recommend a homemade sled again (although I need to remake mine as I had some error in the fence not being vertical enough)

    I can see one of these sleds if you're looking to do arbitrary miters; I use an incra miter gauge for that type of cut.

    Matt

  3. #3
    I'd like to get some feedback on the Dubby & Rockler T/S-sleds from folks that've used them.
    Last edited by Vince Shriver; 05-30-2021 at 3:09 PM.

  4. #4
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    I made one with plywood that had runners on the saw slots. I had a 1x4 back on it laid flat that allowed boards to be cut precisely.

  5. #5
    I used a Dubby for two years at Palomar College. That's where I learned to use a tablesaw and a sled, so I'm probably biased. Great sled, love the micro-adjust for extremely precise cuts, and that's where the rockler x-cut sled falls short, at least the rockler x-cut sled that I've used. The t-track+ flip-downs thing rockler has is fine, I just think it's not as solid as the dubby's...the rockler sled I used had a tiny bit of slop in the t-track flip-downs, whereas the 10 year-old dubby I used had no play in it, after thousands of students and years of abuse. The micro-adjust is well-done, easy to use and effective on the dubby. It's trivial to make an adjustment of a thou or so; I was splitting pencil lines my first session with it as a beginner on the table saw.

    I've just never found flip-downs to be as stable as in-line solutions like that on the dubby, but if you got a rockler sled that had no slop in the flip-downs, I'd say it'd probably be every bit as good as a dubby.

  6. #6
    Thanks, Ed.

  7. #7
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    I use a homemade sled for 90 degree cross cuts. If an angle is needed I reach for the Dubby. It is extremely accurate. It has stops with micro adjusters that work for long stock. It is a simple accurate and wonderful tool.
    Charlie Jones

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince Shriver View Post
    I will be purchasing a commercial table saw sled, specifically 1) The Dubby or 2) Rockler's version. I would greatly appreciate the opinions (pros & cons) from folks who have use either one or both. Price or DIY not a consideration. Thank you, Vince

    Don't exclude Incra's miter express. I went through 3 sleds, home made (ended up too bulky) , Rockler then Incra. In terms of accuracy its better than the Rockler with things like micro adjusting flip stop etc The Rockler is good and definitely adequate but not in the same league.

    Yes I know you can make it, as I did, but sometimes people don't have the time or inclination and would rather buy it. I understand where you're coming from.
    Last edited by Johnny Barr; 05-31-2021 at 2:52 AM.

  9. #9
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    Personally, with no price limitation, I would buy the original (Dubby) rather than the knock off. Rarely hear any complaints about it. Mine is well made, and came with great instructions.

    Check the You Tube Dubby vids.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  10. #10
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    I bought a Dubby years ago at a WWing show, I had a minor problem that I can't remember what it was but a phone call to the Co. took care of it right away, it's a great sled.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Barr View Post
    Don't exclude Incra's miter express. I went through 3 sleds, home made (ended up too bulky) , Rockler then Incra. In terms of accuracy its better than the Rockler with things like micro adjusting flip stop etc The Rockler is good and definitely adequate but not in the same league.

    Yes I know you can make it, as I did, but sometimes people don't have the time or inclination and would rather buy it. I understand where you're coming from.
    I've spent a few years trying to decide between the Miter Express and the Miter 5000. I've used the Dubby--and it's very good. But--my Incra stuff has been absolutely top-notch.
    earl

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince Shriver View Post
    I will be purchasing a commercial table saw sled, specifically 1) The Dubby or 2) Rockler's version. I would greatly appreciate the opinions (pros & cons) from folks who have use either one or both. Price or DIY not a consideration. Thank you, Vince
    Given your original question, I'm not going to suggest want you suggested people to not suggest, although my suggestion would fall into the category of unwanted suggestions. I don't own either sled, but it's interesting to see what others are doing, and copy it.

    How does one replace that block of wood on the blade end of the Dubby fence? It looks like a piece of 8/4 cut with a 3/8" thick leg, precision aligned to match up with the face of the fence.

  13. #13
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    Dec 2007
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    Vince,
    Over 20 years ago I purchased the Dubby sled and to this day I have proclaimed to all that it was the best woodworking purchase that I ever made,
    Since then, I have made several sleds for different reasons but I always seem to go back to the Dubby when the need occurs.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by William Hodge View Post
    Given your original question, I'm not going to suggest want you suggested people to not suggest, although my suggestion would fall into the category of unwanted suggestions. I don't own either sled, but it's interesting to see what others are doing, and copy it.

    How does one replace that block of wood on the blade end of the Dubby fence? It looks like a piece of 8/4 cut with a 3/8" thick leg, precision aligned to match up with the face of the fence.
    Only regret about buying a Dubby, is I waited too long to purchase. Watching The American Woodworker, with Scott Phillips, he uses a Dubby that is so old that it has the wooden fence. The end block can be laminated up. I have done this, and make several at the time. Easier to have on hand than to have to stop project and make another. Jerry Cole came up with the idea for the Dubby, and IMHO, deserves to be compensated for it.
    Last edited by Bruce Wrenn; 05-31-2021 at 10:05 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by William Hodge View Post
    How does one replace that block of wood on the blade end of the Dubby fence? It looks like a piece of 8/4 cut with a 3/8" thick leg, precision aligned to match up with the face of the fence.
    Agreeing with Bruce, it is a minor project to make new/extra blocks for the end of a Dubby fence. I also make bunches of them ahead of need. Mill the wood to proper thickness, cut to size and glue. I also set up a jig on the drill press to space the holes accurately and drill them quickly. I usually drill four holes so I can extend the block more than with two holes. Also saved the original factory block for accurate sizing of new blocks. They are easy enough to make I am wasteful with them. If the one on the Dubby gets a few out of normal position cuts I toss it and put a new one on.
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