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Thread: Router Choice

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Seemann View Post
    You would think, but once you get used to leaving certain bits already set up in particular routers, it is hard to go back. I'm looking at adding a couple trim routers to leave a chamfer in one, round over in another, and a flush cutting bit in yet another. That would put me at 7 or 8 (or 9?) I'm not really sure.
    Even moreso, at least for me, there are some tasks that I just happen to prefer a particular format of router. For example, some of the time, I like the lower center of gravity of my fixed base DW618 as compared to my OF1400 and OF1010 routers. I think if I had a lot more routers, I'd most definitely have one or more "dedicated" to a particular task or tooling to your point.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #32
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    A brand that is almost never discussed is Hitachi. Lowes sells them. Big sky tools has refurbs, sometimes at significant savings. I view the Hitachi KM12VCM fixed/plunge as a successor to the P-C 690 with variable speed. Big Sky has a recons for $109 to $129. Don't have one, never used one, just aware of them. Hitachi also makes a 3 1/4 h.p. Don't know anything about them except they're ugly

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    A brand that is almost never discussed is Hitachi. Lowes sells them. Big sky tools has refurbs, sometimes at significant savings. I view the Hitachi KM12VCM fixed/plunge as a successor to the P-C 690 with variable speed. Big Sky has a recons for $109 to $129. Don't have one, never used one, just aware of them. Hitachi also makes a 3 1/4 h.p. Don't know anything about them except they're ugly
    There's a name shift to Metabo, but they still have some of the same tools that were branded Hitachi.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
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    Curt I have the Hitachi M12v and although looking at it took some getting used to I cannot believe it is not more popular. It has excellent fence and quick release collets,
    1/4 and 1/2 inch that are very good qulaity.

    It is easy to use in my router table without a lift as I inserted a socket ground down into the lifting bolt that takes a 1/4" ratchet extension, and the cost was just under 200.00 for a 3.25 hp routerwith a good dust attachment that hooks to my small shopvac.

    Forgot about the soft satrt and variable speed along with a centering attachment for the base.
    Last edited by michael langman; 12-23-2021 at 6:23 PM.

  5. #35
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    The Hitachi M12V was very. popular for a period of time, but it did fade for some reason. The current, new version is the Metabo HPT M12VEM and sell in the neighborhood of $210-225 US, depending on the vendor.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The Hitachi M12V was very. popular for a period of time, but it did fade for some reason. The current, new version is the Metabo HPT M12VEM and sell in the neighborhood of $210-225 US, depending on the vendor.
    IIRC, there was some peculiarity about the collet at one point. I don't recall any details. At least the new ones aren't 'noteworthy' for their appearance.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    IIRC, there was some peculiarity about the collet at one point. I don't recall any details. At least the new ones aren't 'noteworthy' for their appearance.
    Yea, the back of my brain recalls something like that. The new version has been slightly stylized in appearance/coloration to fit into the Metabo "look" but otherwise has the same functional shape for sure.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Yea, the back of my brain recalls something like that. The new version has been slightly stylized in appearance/coloration to fit into the Metabo "look" but otherwise has the same functional shape for sure.
    Because I was curious I looked at some reviews. Most of the complaints I saw had to do with user ignorance. At least one user couldn't get the bit out and returned the router with the bit still in the collet. Another used a mallet and block of wood to remove the 'stuck' bit. If they had just kept loosening the collet nut it would have gotten snug again and once loose for a second time the bit would have come right out. This seems not uncommon for router collets, My Freud FT2000E is the same. Perhaps there's a lesson here to not take user reviews as gospel.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    Because I was curious I looked at some reviews. Most of the complaints I saw had to do with user ignorance. At least one user couldn't get the bit out and returned the router with the bit still in the collet. Another used a mallet and block of wood to remove the 'stuck' bit. If they had just kept loosening the collet nut it would have gotten snug again and once loose for a second time the bit would have come right out. This seems not uncommon for router collets, My Freud FT2000E is the same. Perhaps there's a lesson here to not take user reviews as gospel.
    My PC, Dewalt all behave like that with the second detent. I think the Festool routers do, too, but I'd have to get them out to check.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #40
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    If it will fit in your router table, grab the spinrite router from Woodpeckers. It looks like bora PM-P254, however comes with an ER20 collect (like the Bora's more expensive model), has the numbs removed to prevent it from catching in a router lift and is soft start. I am pretty impressed with it. You can use the remaining cash too grab a handheld router like the Makita Makita RT0701CX7 (or one of the similar brands)
    Distraction could lead to dismemberment!

  11. #41
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    All of my routers do that. There is a second "resistance" when loosening the collet before it spins freely.
    Jon Endres
    Killing Trees Since 1983

  12. #42
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    To answer OP's original question - I have several routers and each have their purpose. I have always used a Bosch 1617EVS in a router table but the older 1617's suffered from issues regarding corrosion of the housing. I have never been able to solve that problem so my 1617 is relegated to a shelf until I either fix it or pitch it. My go-to for larger bits is my old reliable Bosch 1613EVS, and for smaller bits is a DeWalt DW611 (I have the -PK kit with the plunge and fixed bases). I have a very old Porter Cable router with a D-handle, but it's scary enough I don't use it. Probably 1960's vintage. My newest one is a Ryobi One+ 18V trim router, which is great for spinning a small roundover or chamfer bit. Finally I havea Bosch 1609 laminate trimmer kit with all the bases, and that sits and collects dust.

    If I were buying new, I would look at the Triton routers for a router table, either the DeWalt 618 or Bosch 1617 for table or hand use, and the DeWalt 611 for spinning small 1/4" shank bits.
    Jon Endres
    Killing Trees Since 1983

  13. #43
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    The Porter Cable 690 is a 1 3/4 hp router and a little small in my opinion for bigger bits in a router table. The Porter Cable 890 is a better size and more comparable with the Dewalt 618. The Porter Cable 7539 is a large 3+ hp router with big spindle bearings that should turn most large sized routerbits safely and effectively.

    The PC690 was my first router and a present from my parents 30+ years ago. It has always been one of my favorites. Mine came with a plunge base and router table. The router table did a nice job but the 690 was too small for the lock miter bit I tried in it. The lower spindle bearing wasn't up to that much weight and side torque. I have since picked up a couple more 690's used and really like them all.

    I consider my Bosch 1617 in about the same class as my 690 even though it has a higher rated hp. It is also a very nice router but my PC690's gets more use mainly because I am more used to them than anything.

    My Dewalt 618 is on the large size for hand routing but still useable. I have never tried my Dewalt in a table but I am sure it would do a good job.

    My Porter Cable 7538 is what I use in a router table mostly. I picked it up (looked new) from a Goodwill for $40. It was missing the plunge return spring but when I got it home I found that it had an after market adjustment screw in one of the columns allowing for easy adjustments above the table without a router lift. I forget the name of that aftermarket adjustment device.

    My favorite hand held routers are the old Stanley routers. They are a nice size and weight makeing them very nice to manipulate with a single hand by palming the router body. The little grip knobs on the Stanley routers have been too small for me since I was about 14.

    I do most stationary spindle work on a shaper. A big heavy machine works much better for me with the only downside being the cost of the cutters.
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 12-28-2021 at 2:55 AM.

  14. #44
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    My Porter Cable 7538 is what I use in a router table mostly. I picked it up (looked new) from a Goodwill for $40. It was missing the plunge return spring but when I got it home I found that it had an after market adjustment screw in one of the columns allowing for easy adjustments above the table without a router lift. I forget the name of that aftermarket adjustment device.
    Router Raizer?
    I had looked at one of those and decided on a Freud 1702 VCEK instead.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    Router Raizer?
    I had looked at one of those and decided on a Freud 1702 VCEK instead.
    Yep! That is it.

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