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Thread: Drum Sander Questions

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Montana
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    Anyone wanna share where they're getting their paper from? I get mine currently from industrial abrasives, but the end of the paper almost always rips off after a few minutes of running, and then I have to wrap duct tape around it to hold it in place. Anyone?

  2. #32
    I've been using Klingspor papers. I buy the bigger rolls and just trim the ends down and it's less expensive than pre-cut. Usually don't have a problem with the ends ripping off.

  3. #33
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    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Chapel View Post
    Anyone wanna share where they're getting their paper from? I get mine currently from industrial abrasives, but the end of the paper almost always rips off after a few minutes of running, and then I have to wrap duct tape around it to hold it in place. Anyone?
    All mine are precut to fit my 22-44, various grits, packaged with "Jet" on the box. I bought some from a SMC member and some others through Amazon: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006IHIVA
    These may be more expensive but I don't care - they work well, last a long time, and I've never experienced a torn end. (When I bought them the package was over $10 cheaper than now.)

    JKJ

  4. #34
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    Oct 2008
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    Montana
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    38
    thanks for that.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Tampa Bay area
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    599
    Here is another source that I have had good luck with. Not precut but 75' rolls.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
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    846
    I got my roll of 80 grit from supergrit.com. They have the same product, 3" x 50 yards of X weight cloth backed AO roll for $60 plus shipping. I have never had one tear, I just run them till the abrasive is worn out.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Chapel View Post
    Anyone wanna share where they're getting their paper from? I get mine currently from industrial abrasives, but the end of the paper almost always rips off after a few minutes of running, and then I have to wrap duct tape around it to hold it in place. Anyone?
    Because of how these drum sanders (Performax and similar) use spring clamps to hold the paper ends, the backing has to be very sturdy to avoid ripping. Try an OEM roll or pre-cut and see if you still have the issue. If so, perhaps there's a sharp edge or something is out of kilter with the retention mechanism. Those spring clips are a "royal pain", regardless of machine brand!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
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    70
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Jones View Post
    My Supermax 16-32 is used on nearly every project I do. The one thing that I think is useless is the digital readout. I just run the drum down until it touches the stock and a little more each pass. You get the feel of it pretty quick.
    I agree. Keep some inexpensive micrometers on the machine and measure actual material as it comes out.

    My advice is to buy the wides you can afford, for space and finances.

    Supermax is the best drum sander for the $.

    If wrapping the drums is difficult, try reducing by one wrap, introducing gaps between each wrap. Makes installing the abrasive much easier as there's more wiggle room at each end for inserting into the clamps.
    Timberlight Designs

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
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    6,394
    I would not buy an opened ended drum sander again. Too much flex leading to variance.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    I would not buy an opened ended drum sander again. Too much flex leading to variance.
    Interesting, I havenít noticed that with mine. Maybe they are not all created equal, or perhaps I use lighter passes.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    SoCal
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Hayes View Post
    Have you tried the Jet tool 98-0060 for the inboard clip? You can grab the clip AND slip the tool up on the drum to hold the clip hands free. Then take your time and feed the paper into the right spot before releasing the tool and clip. A lot of people don't understand how to use the tool correctly. Download the instructions. You just have to make sure you get the paper in the right spot under the clip. I recommend taking the curl out of the paper, straighten it, before you stick it in the clip area. Otherwise it curls up in the wrong place and isn't locked down. I have 3 performax 22-44's with the same clip.

    I was re-reading some of this thread and had missed Russel's reference to the JET 98-0060 Tuftool. I rarely have trouble with the Supermax 19-38 clip but was curious. Using the pictures in the manual as a reference I formed one up using some hard steel wire. I have some heavier wire I figured I would use if I could figure it out.

    Disclaimer: I am no metal worker by any stretch.

    This will be obvious from looking at the pics.

    TUFTool (1).jpg . TUFTool (2).jpg . TUFTool (3).jpg

    It only took a few minutes to bend the wire. I was guessing at proportions and had to re-bend a couple joints a couple of times. It does make an already easy job (I have small hands) even easier
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
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    846
    I have no trouble with the clips on my 19-38, though there was a bit of a learning curve at first. I wear 2XL or (when I can find them) 3XL size gloves. I can imagine that if the clip was made with a little twist somewhere or something like that it could make it much harder to use, so maybe I just am lucky to have an easy one. I find that it helps if I stretch the roll onto the drum as tightly as I can and then turn the drum on for a few seconds and then when it stops I can get a little more stretch on the roll. I usually do that again after the first pass of actually sanding with a new piece. Otherwise it gets too loose.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    458
    7 months and 7 days. (If I did the math right) from ordering(and paying) to picking the 25-50 up this morning.

    Assembled the base and will try to figure out how to mount the unit after lunch. (More moving the weight around is the challenge)

    John

  14. #44
    There is one style of double drum sander that is different that the performax type of drum sanders. They are made under a few names - CWI, Powermatic, Grizzly, Baileigh and a few others. They come in 25" and 37" versions and they have a bunch of different features than the traditional open end sanders or the double drum performax clones.

    They all come in a significant floor standing machine. The 37" versions are around 1000 lb's. They have thick rubber coated 6" drums to minimize heat soak and improve finish. They have rubber conveyor belts like a wide belt sander does and the feed rate is much quicker than the performax style. They also have spring loaded rubber hold down rollers kind of like a planer does. They have much larger motors. Most are 7.5 hp or more for the 37" version and 5hp for the 25" versions. Powermatic decided to move the drive belts into the cabinet for some reason, most of the others have the drive belts in a small enclosure on the side to keep the belts out of the sawdust.

    The sandpaper swap is easier because of the design of the hold downs and the dust collection is very good. Plus, they are very basic machines. Much less complex than most widebelt sanders.

    CWI and Powermatic come with 5 year warranties and come with a nice set of cabinet doors underneath to store the abrasives.

    They go from $6k to $7k for the 37" and are built to work all day.

    I have the CWI and am really happy with it.


    PK
    PKwoodworking

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    5,022
    Add Woodmaster to that list, Paul.

    I have had a 37" for 15 years +, and it is a solid, and easy to load machine. No clips, it uses packing tape on the edges, which makes it easy to have two grits on the same roller. Mine currently has 100 on one side, and 150 on the other, which gives me an effectively double 15 or 16" sander, if you can follow my reasoning.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

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