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Thread: Spontaneous Combustion

  1. #31
    I looked on the MDS sheet for this stuff wondering if it had linseed oil in it. Which it doesn't reveal.

    I've been told that linseed is the underlying substance with this problem. Anyone?

    T

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Natural oils like Linseed, Teak, etc. are the culprit. Dead Dinosaurs are not involved unless you have an ignition source.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    The cord reel thing is not just resistance heating. It can function as an inductive heater with or without a metal core. Welders have known this for decades, ever since ac was invented. It is not an issue with DC. This is a similar reason that spark plug wires are not in nice parallel symmetrical runs
    My Mom had a good story about the night before huge concrete pour they realized they had to electrically insulate all the rebar connections for the foundation of a particle accelerator since it would use pulsed magnetic fields. Otherwise the rebar would form a current loop and soak up energy like an induction stove.
    Bill D

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Tippecanoe County, IN
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    790
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    The cord reel thing is not just resistance heating. It can function as an inductive heater with or without a metal core.
    No, that's a common internet myth. An extension cord has two wires with equal and opposite currents. The magnetic fields cancel. That's why you have to separate the two wires to get a reading with a clamp type ammeter.

    There is common mode inductance of course, so if you have a ground fault, yes, you get some field, but not in normal operation.
    Beranek's Law:

    It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion.
    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

  5. #35
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    Sep 2016
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    Now you will tell me crosstalk on phone wires is a myth a swell.
    Bill D

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Tippecanoe County, IN
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    790
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Now you will tell me crosstalk on phone wires is a myth a swell.
    Bill D
    No, just a different cause. Twisted pairs are use to reduce crosstalk, but you don't get complete cancellation in the nearfield. And that's the last of it. No further derailment of a good thread.
    Beranek's Law:

    It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion.
    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

  7. #37
    My rags were on top of the can...not in it

  8. #38
    Paint can was metal...but rags were on top of the can not in it. Burned hot enough to crumple the can.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    When I first started using epoxy I mixed a batch in a soup can on a hot humid day. When I picked up the can in a couple of minutes it burnt my hand pretty bad. Without mistakes there is no learning, but I would much rater learn from yours!

  10. #40
    I've never had spontaneous combustion happen to me but then again I'm a bit anal on it. I grew up on a farm and I've seen a couple of barns burn down due to spontaneous combustion. I have a rack and water jug I put outside to dry out any oil impregnated rags I have used.

  11. #41
    trimmed the rose of sharon at my families, several hours later moved the bag of trimmings and it was hot, didnt have the digital meter with me. I know grass clippings heat up a little but this was hot and when I opened up the bag there was smoke coming from them. Dont know if it has anything to do with how fast they grow but those suckers are on steroids. I will never leave a bag of those in a garage.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    Denver, CO
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    Linseed oil oxidizes as it dries out, that oxidation is what causes the exothermic reaction.

    The chemistry behind it is pretty awesome and because itís an oxidation reaction, robbing it of oxygen prevents it (submerge in water, tight can lid).

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Cedar Park, TX - Boulder Creek, CA
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    There's a paper on it if you search for 'low temperature oxidation of linseed oil'. I scanned it rather quickly. It's over my head to really read and comprehend it.

    Things I didn't know:

    It's the metallic compounds added to speed the drying that are responsible.

    It gets heavier as it dries, from the oxygen it absorbs.

    It's used in the manufacture of 'Linoleum'. Never really thought about where that name came from.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Michigan
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    Hazmat day next week, guess that can of linseed oil goes. I never use it anyway and a leaky can could be disastrous.

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