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Thread: And so it begins...time to setup the temporary shop at the new property

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I have no need for new equipment, Alan. My CNC is only two years old. My MM J/P and MM16 as well as my Stubby lathe are not going anywhere but into the new shop. The cost to buy new on things like that would total close to $35K at current prices, give or take. And I have a work backlog that can't wait a year. I'll have everything moved within the next few weeks. I'm busy arranging the stuff I brought over yesterday so I have space for the "next loads" as well as planning for the electrical work I need to do to make my machines wake up once they are here. That includes contemplating what can and cannot share circuits... CNC has to be dedicated (four wire) as does the compressor. I gotta count spaces and decide if I want to try and cram into the remaining space in the main panel or put in a sub-panel dedicated to the machinery. The latter is getting more an more attractive because of access and would also make supporting all the surface mount conduit easier to support and connect to directly without doing the bendy-bendy thing into the wall. I have to extend the outlet for the garage door opener, too, as the new unit being installed soon will be a jack-shaft version to get the box off the ceiling. I fortunately have overhead access for that available in the attic above the gara.., err...shop...
    I personally like a sub-panel for machinery and additional circuits. The opportunity to place the sub-panel in a convenient location is a definite plus.
    The dust collection ducting may be a bit more challenging than the old shop, but where there is a will there is a way!
    That is, if it'll even be installed in this semi-temporary shop ...

  2. #32
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    Sub-panel will be right there with the main panel and the other "sub" panel that's for the separately metered appliances...

    IMG_E9430-2.jpg

    I do not intend to install any duct work in the temp space, other than an overhead accommodation for the CNC machine which is necessary due to dust collection design. I'm acquiring a mobile single stage with a canister filter from 'Creeker Steve W who lives nearby to cover the need until a building goes up. That, of course can be reevaluated at any time and I can certainly pull my Oneida cyclone out of storage if needs be.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #33
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    Well, your Festools found a good temporary home. What in the world is in that huge systainer on the bottom?

    I loved the jackshaft garage door openers I put in my last house. So much better than the conventional ones.

    Sounds like getting things up and running for work for you is your highest priority. Good luck. You certainly have the talent and motivation to have that happen.
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  4. #34
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    I would at least gt a price on a timber frame. You may find that the price has gone up as much as a stick built building.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    Well, your Festools found a good temporary home. What in the world is in that huge systainer on the bottom?
    Domino on the bottom Sys-5 and the Sys-5 above it has my DeWalt DW-618 and all its bases in it plus a few other odds and ends.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zeller View Post
    I would at least gt a price on a timber frame. You may find that the price has gone up as much as a stick built building.
    When I looked at that in my initial research, the cost for timber frame was nearly three times other options. I'd love it esthetically, but I can't justify it. That said, I'll definitely get a ball park quote for that option when I start to move toward making a decision.

    -------

    Today I moved more stuff...the finishing cabinets and the remaining Festool things like the rails, some material support thingies, etc. I've already pretty much decided I need to acquire some wall cabinets for the temporary shop..and they will relocate to the future building. I need to get stuff stored up out of the workspace so I have room for the tools to move in. I'm going to check the ReStore first, but if they don't have anything acceptable at a price I'm willing to pay, Ikea will get the nod. I don't have the luxury of building cabinets right now...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #36
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    Jim, the local (40 miles) Reclaimed Materials outlet (Williston SC) has (new) cabinets. Don't know if there is one near you. They will ship LTL.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugene Dixon View Post
    Jim, the local (40 miles) Reclaimed Materials outlet (Williston SC) has (new) cabinets. Don't know if there is one near you. They will ship LTL.
    The local Habitat ReStore had nothing...they are preparing to move to a much larger (and nicer) location. Upper cabinets from Ikea were $45 each which is a lot less than raw materials even without the current uptick in costs. For my purpose, they are fine and they will also move to the new shop building once it's built.

    I need to build a small platform to put my finishing materials cabinet on to level it (sloped floor) and also bring it up to the height of the "curb" so I can put the back up to the wall. That's one of my tasks for today after food shopping.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
    Have you discussed with your realtor the possibility of selling the property with some of the major equipment in place. While it might complicate the sale it would certainly for the right buyer be a feature for the sale.
    In your climate 400 sq ft would be a 9 or 12 kbtu, depending upon insulation/orientation of the building. That would not be sufficient for your proposed 850 or so, but a 15/18 in a well constructed/insulated building would be about right. I canít see how the numbers would work out in moving a mini from location to location.

  9. #39
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    A few years ago I talked fairly seriously with some guys from NH who were moving and recycling old timber frames. Their prices were not that much different than stick-building a new building. I ended up not going that way because they didn't have a building "in stock" that could be readily modified to get my 12-1/2 ft tall trailer into. They fumigated the wood for bugs and replaced any compromised members. That garage is uninsulated, adding SIPS for walls and insulation for the timberframe would have been more expensive than blown-in cellulose or even foam in the stick-built structure, but would yield a very tight building. A lot of barns had relatively low ceilings, but you could put it up on a concrete stem wall to gain overhead on the first floor.

  10. #40
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    I'll second the Mini-split unit. I got a Senville off of ebay that works great. I mainly bought for my basement for the heating aspect of it. But the AC works great and you can just run it as a fan. Went up really easily, my main issue was drilling a 4" diameter hole through 8 1/2" of concrete. That took an hour and $125 bit, but it is done. I'll probably add one in by main shop next year.

    Oh, I tried one of those roll around portable AC units a few years ago. While it works, it is a big hassle and always in the way. Getting exhaust hot air out was always the main issue.
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    Have you discussed with your realtor the possibility of selling the property with some of the major equipment in place. While it might complicate the sale it would certainly for the right buyer be a feature for the sale.
    The only machine I'd even remotely consider doing that with is the Oneida cyclone system and only because it's going to be a pain to de-install. The CNC, J/P, BS, DP, drum sander and Lathe are all making the move...I could not replace them for less than twice what I paid for most of them; the exception being the CNC which is the newest.

    -----
    Roger, I've always admired Timber Frame and SIPS...ever since an ToH project many years ago that took that approach with what was originally a barn. I don't think it's going to be something practical or affordable here. I'm looking at something that will be somewhere between 24'x36' and 30'x30', depending on how I can site in with minimal impact on a few trees while meeting pesky setbacks.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #42
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    Well...today was "move the screws" day! "Stuff's gettin' real...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #43
    Good luck Jim.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The only machine I'd even remotely consider doing that with is the Oneida cyclone system and only because it's going to be a pain to de-install. The CNC, J/P, BS, DP, drum sander and Lathe are all making the move...I could not replace them for less than twice what I paid for most of them; the exception being the CNC which is the newest.

    -----
    Roger, I've always admired Timber Frame and SIPS...ever since an ToH project many years ago that took that approach with what was originally a barn. I don't think it's going to be something practical or affordable here. I'm looking at something that will be somewhere between 24'x36' and 30'x30', depending on how I can site in with minimal impact on a few trees while meeting pesky setbacks.
    I had a timber framer raise the frame for my house but did the SIPs myself. The bids I got to install them (since I bought them with the timber frame) was insane. Two of us did almost all of the walls in 2 days and I had the crane come back for one day to lift the roof panels. But I had a number of challenges (3 dormers and the living room, two stories, and the biggest was one side of the house has a 12' drop). A single story shop with not a lot of features would be easy.

  15. #45
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    I'm more than happy to handle all the inside work in whatever the new shop ends up being, but I know better than to take on any structural work at this point...I cannot physically handle that. My goal will be a building shell done by others plus the electrical service to the structure.
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    I got some cabinets built and hung yesterday and will fill them up today. That's going to clear out a lot of the floor in the temp shop so I can then contemplate the how and when of moving the machinery. I have quote requests out for the sub-panel and hope they come in reasonable.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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