Page 7 of 9 FirstFirst ... 3456789 LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 130

Thread: And so it begins...time to setup the temporary shop at the new property

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    Woo, hoo! Sub-panel is in. Inspector will be here tomorrow morning. Once that's out of the way, I can get to finalizing footprint and proceed with getting circuits and air in place, followed by figuring out my dust collection which will be fun. Hopefully, in a week or two, stuff will be usable.

    IMG_9605.jpg

    The lathe (broken down into components) remains at the old shop. I think my plan for moving that is to do so concurrent with the timing of moving the Kubota (Big Orange Power Tool - "BOPT"). I can load the heaviest piece onto my trailer with the BOPT, move said BOPT to the new property with the 6x12 UHaul rental I need to do that, transport the lathe and then unload it with the BOPT at the new place. No hurry on that for now because it's taking time to sell the old property (nature of the property and the price) and it will not be in my way as I deal with circuits and air as noted above.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKinney, TX
    Posts
    1,840
    Yea power.
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Jenkins View Post
    Yea power.
    Kinda important...LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    Inspector was by this morning. He's a woodworker...primarily turning. Nice fellow. He passed the sub-panel for "rough", but is requiring me to have stuff hooked up to it before he'll grant final. No problem. I spent money today gathering the stuff I need to take care of that. Sadly, I had to go to FOUR different stores to get everything I needed...Home Depot, Lowes, a local home center and finally the local electric supply house. Only the latter had the 50' of 10-2 I needed in-stock. They also had the best price for the wire by a mile. But wow...$69 for 50 feet. I'm thankful that I have leftover 10-3 from the old shop for the CNC drop as well as more than enough 12-2 for everything else.

    Time to play with conduit and wire.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #95
    I designed and drew plans for my new house. Involved my contractor in planning. Was planning a separate shop about 24' X 32'. Looking at the plot plan I wondered about making the shop part of the house, just a big garage. The contractor suggested it would be a major cost savings - it was huge. The garage along side the house became 24' X 60'. No separate permit and officials hardly paid attention. The subtrades didn't see it as a separate project - added some hours and materials. Winter weather season and a lot of building in my area so various contractors and trades would ask to use my shop space which I wasn't using until my house was finished. I asked they leave it better after they used it - was totally finished, trim carpentry, painted, clean concrete floor in the end. As construction went along I had electrical panel, 110 outlets every 4 ft and 220 outlts every 8 ft. Roughed in plumbing for toilet and work sink. After I moved in I built a wall dividing it into a garage and separate shop. Shop is 650 sq ft. I walk out of the house, across the garage and into my shop. Running planer and dust system my wife can't hear from house. I finished the bathroom, built cabinets for shop sink, and added a mini split. I have no garage doors into the shop area - everything fits thru 36 inch doors - makes heating and ac efficient. Cost was about 1/3 of free standing shop.

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    John, one house we looked at (but never got a chance to bid on) had what was the physically equivalent of about an 8 car garage attached to the home. The original two vehicle setup had been expanded at some point, likely someone was a car buff as there was a sub-panel in the space and a 240v outlet labeled for a welder. For new construction, what you state is very valid around cost control.

    ------

    I have my wiring essentially done outside of testing and one blank plate that I'll pick up from the old property tomorrow as I know I have one there. Hopefully the inspector will be pleased with the work...it's neat, orderly and done correctly. Today I did have to spend some time up on the attic above the gara...err....shop...to extend the 120v utility circuit and the 240v machine shared circuit to the other side, but at least it wasn't a humid day. My next tasks are the air system and getting my act together around dust collection. Another thread here gave me an idea I'm going to consider since I have a SDD available with the single stage unit I scarfed from Steve Wurster.

    IMG_9619.jpg IMG_9620.jpg IMG_9622.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    I'm happy to say that the electrical work is physically completed, fully tested and just needs that pesky final inspection. I also figured out how I'm going to deal with the air, so the bigger mental gyration at this point will be around dust collection which needs to serve the J/P, CNC, Bandsaw and router table; all but the first one are smack in the middle of the space.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Trenton SC, in the CSRA
    Posts
    278
    Jim, please, what is the benefit of your receptacle orientation? Looks side ways compared to household use, to me. Is it for higher voltages?

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Eugene Dixon View Post
    Jim, please, what is the benefit of your receptacle orientation? Looks side ways compared to household use, to me. Is it for higher voltages?
    It's not about benefit...it's how the PVC boxes are manufactured. It doesn't matter how they are oriented relative to use.
    -------

    Everything is tested and I have my air system in, too. It does appear my auto-drain for the compressor is dead (and stuck open) so I"m going to just route things as a manual drain for now until I have a building up. On to dust collection...I think I have a handle on how I'm going to mount the SDD and Delta single stage DC on the wall and then use a short run of duct on the ceiling to get to the center area to service the BS, CNC and router table.

    This heavy (drive over) wire/hose cover gets all the electric, air and communications to the tools in the middle.

    IMG_9628.jpg IMG_9626.jpg IMG_9629.jpg
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 06-27-2021 at 5:47 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    Today I spent a bit of time working on the dust collection setup for this temporary shop. It's not optional...'can't use the J/P without it and given the shop is physically connected to our house, controlling the stuff where practical is necessary. I recently acquired the single stage DC and SDD from Steve Wurster that he had for sale. My original intention was to perhaps just use the single stage as a roll-around and convert the SDD to some cash, but honestly, there's just no practical way to do "roll around" in this space. Christopher Charles's recent thread that showed his similar units mounted on the wall clicked for my situation because I A) have the wall available back behind the J/P and B) can use just a small amount of duct to service the 3 tools that absolutely need it....J/P, CNC and router table...plus the bandsaw that benefits from it.

    So today I built a wall mount for the SDD out of some plywood that the previous owner used for shelving (I'm using every little piece of that thar gold...) and picked up a couple of long, heavy duty brackets to mount the single stage up on the wall, too. It was a Festool kinda day for fabrication which honestly will mirror how a lot of projects get done for awhile until I have a building. I did have to do the mounts for the DC twice because I neglected the fact that there's a big metal conduit up on the ceiling a few inches from the wall which got in the way of putting the Wynn canister filter back on the unit once it was mounted. I guess I got my exercise for the day lifting that sucker up there, taking it down and then lifting it back up after moving the brackets down a couple of inches. LOL At any rate, it was good progress and will now allow me to do some measuring to figure out what I need to do for a duct to the center of the space that will be shared by three tools. The J/P will get serviced nearly directly to the cyclone...not the best way technically, but the only way practically.

    IMG_9630.jpg IMG_9631.jpg IMG_9632.jpg IMG_9633.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #101
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    784
    That DC and SDD look nice mounted on the wall, Jim. Nice work.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  12. #102
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wurster View Post
    That DC and SDD look nice mounted on the wall, Jim. Nice work.
    Thanks, Steve. I'm considering moving the SDD up much higher if I determine that is more efficient for the small amount of duct work I need to do. I almost called you yesterday to help with the lift after the first attempt with Professor Dr. SWMBO wasn't successful, but found that with the filter off after I decided to invert it, I could do the deed myself with better hand placement. Did you use a remote switch with this and if so, which one? That's going to be necessary because inverting the unit puts the switch on the DC toward the wall and out of sight. That's both impractical and not exactly the safest arrangement.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #103
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    784
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Thanks, Steve. I'm considering moving the SDD up much higher if I determine that is more efficient for the small amount of duct work I need to do. I almost called you yesterday to help with the lift after the first attempt with Professor Dr. SWMBO wasn't successful, but found that with the filter off after I decided to invert it, I could do the deed myself with better hand placement. Did you use a remote switch with this and if so, which one? That's going to be necessary because inverting the unit puts the switch on the DC toward the wall and out of sight. That's both impractical and not exactly the safest arrangement.
    I did not have a remote switch for this, no. I had to walk over to it every time and flip it manually. I did run it with the motor on the bottom at one point as well, before I hung it on the wall, however my orientation was reversed and so the switch faced outwards. It was a little weird flipping a switch "down" to turn the unit on though, but I got used to it at the time.

    Note that you can remove the motor from the main housing and rotate it 90 or even 180 degrees so that the switch is more accessible. That's obviously harder to do with the motor on the bottom like you have, but if you're going to move it higher on the wall then you can make that rotation change with the unit on the floor and motor side up.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  14. #104
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wurster View Post

    Note that you can remove the motor from the main housing and rotate it 90 or even 180 degrees so that the switch is more accessible. That's obviously harder to do with the motor on the bottom like you have, but if you're going to move it higher on the wall then you can make that rotation change with the unit on the floor and motor side up.
    That makes sense...but I'm not taking that sucker down again to modify it! Twice was enough for my, um...mature...muscles and bones. I have it secured already, too. I'm just going to buy a remote...not because I need a roving switch, but simply because the location of the DC isn't going to be convenient to flip the switch in either direction even if it were facing forward, especially given the tool I use the most is the CNC which is on the other side of the "tool island".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #105
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    459
    Glad you are getting settled in your temporary space.

    For your new space...that looks like a lot of grass to traverse. Are you going to have some kind of walkway? Or you'll back your truck/trailer through the grass? Just thinking of delivery on that slider and future purchases.

    I did 10' walls in mine, but also had it vaulted up to 12'. I really like the extra space to swing lumber around and not worry about hitting the ceiling. The slopes didn't really make any difference with the lighting, maybe a little extra shadow at the very top.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •