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Thread: And so it begins...time to setup the temporary shop at the new property

  1. #61
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    Jim...looking forward to seeing you new temporary digs come together and ultimately your new shop. A lot of work for sure. Good luck with the remainder of the move.
    A wannabe woodworker!

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    My favorite over the top real estate transaction of the year goes to a house in Idaho I was reading about. Idaho's housing market is beyond on fire, as people are fleeing California, Oregon, and Washington like they are on fire.
    Almost certainly California will be in the coming months https://www.drought.gov/states/california
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...ge-photo-essay

    Frightening stuff.

  3. #63
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    SO...dropped 1200 lbs of off-cuts, shorts and other wood + construction refuse off at the local recycling center yesterday. The place was a madhouse and me with my SUV and trailer navigating amongst the big container trucks and the largest wheel loader I've ever been near was an interesting experience. It was muddy, too, and I had to unload every piece by hand. The two dudes working were running around like heads with their chickens cut off directing traffic. LOL I may or may not have to take another load, but it's less expensive than renting a dumpster by far. $72 to drop that 1200 lbs. A dumpster is minimum $400 right now.
    -------

    Today was "let there be light" day in the temporary shop. 8 of the 10 LED fixtures I'm bringing from the old shop are up and working. "Yuge" difference for sure.

    IMG_9508.jpg

    My permit for the subpanel should be cleared in the next couple of days...spoke with the person reviewing it earlier today to answer a question he had and he said it would be moved along. I did find an electrician happy to do the hour or so of work to complete the sub-panel install as soon as the paper is in-hand. While I "can" do this work myself, I prefer to have the panel hooked up by the pro and this guy will likely get the work for connecting up the new shop building when that comes into being. His attitude is that the "small jobs" have a good place in his business...they fill in available time that otherwise wouldn't be bringing in any money at all. Too many around here want to charge a fee just to even look at a situation to do a quote.

    I do need to start moving machinery soon...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #64
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    Ok, while I was waiting for mud/spackle to dry, etc., I did some more work on the potential "layout" of the temporary shop. I'm not fond of doing formal "layouts" because invariably, something is going to change multiple times. OTOH, doing things to scale shows exactly how much space I DON'T have At least it's a starting point. I may end up storing the "guitar bench", but I'd like to avoid it if I can because it has some things I like to use even for other work...such as being a tall 'standing' bench that's available for a detail when I have my main bench down low for whatever reason. I also have realized since printing out the drawing that I'm going to have to change the orientation of the main bench 90 because of the slope so I can level it better after leveling the CNC. Those two elements must be level.

    Temp-Shop-Layout.jpg

    Gonna need to do a "power pole" type drop in the center, but however I do that, it will also serve to support a swing arm for a dust collection hose over the CNC machine. Not shown in the diagram is a mobile DC I'm grabbing from Steve Wurster to use until I have a building and am back to duct work and a cyclone. The drum sander is mobile and on top of the cabinet that has the OSS on a pull-out.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 06-05-2021 at 4:43 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #65
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    I used my DC rigid drops as "poles" and ty-wrapped or velcro wrapped other services to them. Glad you are getting straight to it. I was in the state of mind that I would be moving in to the new shop in just a few months. This made it doubly difficult to carve out a space to work temporarily when reality hit. It looks like you will have a serviceable space there.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  6. #66
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    Thanks, Glenn. The temp shop will work fine, albeit I'll need to do some things differently than I prefer relative to workflow and methods. While I'm super anxious to get cracking on a shop building, which I'm absolutely sure you can appreciate , I'm also convinced that rushing things would be a mistake. Aside from the current elevated cost aspects with any kind of construction, I really need to come to grips with where I want to physically locate the building behind the house. The spot that would be "most convenient" for things like bringing in material, etc., isn't necessarily the best choice when it comes to preserving live trees and minimizing ground preparation. There's another spot that, with the removal of an actually dead pine tree, will provide the required space for a 24x30 to 24x36 building and also allow me to keep and restore an existing 10x16 shed. The latter would need to be re-sided with new T1-11 SmartSide and some new shingles, but keeping it in place for lawn care stuff and storage means I could possibly get away with a slightly smaller shop building since I don't have to incorporate space for a ZTR and other property maintenance things. So I'm going to bide my time, work things out carefully, get things vetted and approved by the local zoning officer even before any official permit application (he's a nice guy) and then make the final decision and move on it. I need the old property sold first, too...that's going slowly because it's a unique property in a higher price range where the market is a little less hot than we experience while buying this place.

    This too shall pass...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    ...means I could possibly get away with a slightly smaller shop building
    Heresy.... Witch. Burn him...
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    Heresy.... Witch. Burn him...
    ROFL!!! But seriously, 4-6' in length can be as much as $5K difference in cost, depending on what option I take and if I can retain the existing 10x16 shed, I'd still have the same effective shop space footprint I've intended to have here. OTOH, if I can afford it, doing the same size I original planned for both uses would be great, while staying under the allowable footprint for the property. I'll cross that bridge when I know the other property is sold.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #69
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    Aug 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The only machine I'd even remotely consider doing that with is the Oneida cyclone system and only because it's going to be a pain to de-install. The CNC, J/P, BS, DP, drum sander and Lathe are all making the move...I could not replace them for less than twice what I paid for most of them; the exception being the CNC which is the newest.

    -----
    Roger, I've always admired Timber Frame and SIPS...ever since an ToH project many years ago that took that approach with what was originally a barn. I don't think it's going to be something practical or affordable here. I'm looking at something that will be somewhere between 24'x36' and 30'x30', depending on how I can site in with minimal impact on a few trees while meeting pesky setbacks.
    I posted my shop build here a couple of years ago. Two things I did right:
    1. After multiple meetings with the city regional building, and neighbors, I maximized my footprint to allowable for our lot setbacks. Ended up w 40 x 30’, thinking I’ll never get another shot at using this space and it’s the only possible location on our property. It seemed huge at first but now is filled up!
    2. I wanted a structural floor, for comfort and the ability to fix boat frames to wood while building. Also RB wouldn’t let me do a monumental slab. In the end having a full basement wasn’t that much more than a crawl space. Can’t tell you how glad I am to move DC, compressor, three phase generator and metal shop stuff downstairs. Plus my lofting table for boat design and tons of storage.

    Not immediate concerns w your temp garage site, but more important down the line.

    jon
    Last edited by Jon Snider; 06-08-2021 at 2:20 PM.

  10. #70
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    Jon, I hear you. I'm playing with the space out back in my mind and in CAD to come up with the best arrangement that will still fit into my mental budget. That's also the reason that putting the shop building in a spot that was not my original "top choice" is getting more serious consideration because it means I can maximize the space for woodworking if I can retain the existing shed for lawn and garden, even with the cost of replacing the siding and roofing materials on that structure. I noted that in my previous response. It's a balancing act! A basement or crawl space isn't going to happen, but I haven't rulled out some creative arrangements for the floor. That said, it's "most likely" I'm going to end up with concrete because some of the building options require or "strongly recommend" it. But it may not be a "concrete work surface" when I'm done with it. Hard to say at this point!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #71
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    Mar 2003
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    Today was machinery moving day! I need to publicly thank 'Creeker Steve Wurster and my daughter's boyfriend Dan for providing some muscle. I'm also thankful that I put that winch on my trailer last week...it was just the ticket for loading/unloading the J/P and the CNC machine safely.

    Before:

    IMG_9533.jpg IMG_9519.jpg

    Three trips...

    IMG_E9538.jpg IMG_E9540.jpg IMG_E9541.jpg

    Some semblance of order taking place and, um...quite a few years of "gunk" getting removed, too. (DP not staying there...it's just a convenient parking place for the moment) The general plan I posted up above seems like it will work with just a little minor tweaking.

    IMG_E9542.jpg IMG_9548.jpg

    Compressor will live here as it makes it easy for me to get the auto-drain routed outside

    IMG_9547.jpg

    All of my tools and machinery is now moved with the exception of the Stubby 750 lathe. I need to tear that down into components to be able to move it safely and didn't have the necessary hex tools with me today. Hopefully, I'll have my permit for the sub-panel in a few days so I can start moving toward occasions where I can yell, "It's ALIVE!!"
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #72
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    Yesterday, after disassembling the Stubby lathe and doing a few other small things at the old shop, I spent some time getting the big machines placed and back on the floor. I may move the J/P another two inches or so toward the garage door so that the ladder for the attic above the gar, err....shop... can come down to the floor without flexing the aluminum to clear the end of the J/P outfeed table while unfolding it. It's a "little thing". LOL I also got all the fixed stuff for the compressor on the wall...filters, off-compressor regulator and auto drain. For the latter the drain "exhaust" goes out through the wall.

    IMG_9557.jpg

    Today, I moved the remainder of my lumber to the storage unit with the exception of slab stock and turning blanks. I'll get to those next and will probably liquidate a bunch of the turning stock.

    IMG_9564.jpg IMG_9567.jpg

    The old shop is looking pretty, um...empty. And large. Heh, heh... (tears....)

    IMG_9556.jpg IMG_9561.jpg IMG_9562.jpg IMG_9563.jpg

    And the rack is pretty darn empty...

    IMG_9565.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #73
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    Whew! I get wore out just thinking about the work involved!

    LOML is making little comments about downsizing my shop. I don't even want to think about it..
    Please help support the Creek.


    During the middle ages they celebrated the end of the plague with wine and orgies. Does anyone know if there is anything planned when this one ends?

    ---

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post

    LOML is making little comments about downsizing my shop. I don't even want to think about it..
    That doesn't sound like a plausable situation, Bruce.


    And yea, this has been a lot of work. The whole move has given Professor Dr SWMBO had a very heavy teaching load, which meant I've handled pretty much everything. I still have a lot more stuff to get out of the upstairs of the old shop, but I can also "see the light at the end of the tunnel". Hopefully, that's not a train coming at me. LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #75
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    Oct 2015
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    SW Florida
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    Looks like you're making great progress Jim, albeit a whole lot of work. Just think of it as preparation for that awesome new shop you're going to build yourself once all the dust settles.
    A wannabe woodworker!

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