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Thread: And so it begins...time to setup the temporary shop at the new property

  1. #76
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    Mar 2016
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    Millstone, NJ
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    371
    Jim
    Dont cut yourself short. It will be more expensive later if you want to add on. And you never know when someone will sell a 10k bf hardwood collection for $100.

    As far as positioning. I had thoughts for myself at one point to place the shop in a place and build it in such a way that I could build a large covered patio on the house side of it for parties etc. Dont know if this could apply to you. My property has a park like feel that my wife, or myself for that matter, doesn't really want interrupted with a deck or patio.

    Also I would have come and picked up cutoffs and shorts. Saving you dump money

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Thanks for your kind words, David and George. David..."when the dust settles'...I think there's a ton of it in my system right now from the deinstall of the cyclone and duct work this morning. LOL George, I think you would have been disappointed in the stuff I took to the recycling center and they have a minimum fee. LOL But I appreciate that some of it might have been usable.

    As to siting the new building, it pretty much as to go in one specific spot to both meet the required setbacks for a building over 200 sq ft (close to 900 sq ft planned) while at the same time not requiring me to take down living trees. I sure wish I could have been able to leverage the 6' from the side line that a small shed enjoys, but accessory buildings larger than 200 sq ft have to follow the same setback rules as the primary structure which is 15' off the side line and there has to be a minimum of 35' from the back property line as "required back yard". The 35' isn't an issue because it takes a very nice live tree out of the picture. The 15' from the side makes for more of the building encroaching on the view from the nearly full width sun porch and the small patio. It will not be objectionable, but would have been "more pleasant" closer to the line. This positioning also means that if I put in any kind of "driveway" to the shop building, it will have to cut across the back lawn as it's on the opposite side of the house from the driveway.

    This is kinda the spot it has to go, although marking on a photo doesn't necessarily give the best visual impression. I'm going to need to play with the dimensions a bit to see what works best, but my goal is 24x36 if at all possible.

    Building-Site-A.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    SW Florida
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    Jim, does your governing jurisdiction allow for legal variances to the set back codes? It may be worth exploring since time isn't the issue at the moment. If it doesn't impede public areas or your neighbors, and no one objects, it may be possible...if it's even allowed? Just curious.
    A wannabe woodworker!

  4. #79
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lageman View Post
    Jim, does your governing jurisdiction allow for legal variances to the set back codes? It may be worth exploring since time isn't the issue at the moment. If it doesn't impede public areas or your neighbors, and no one objects, it may be possible...if it's even allowed? Just curious.
    In this particular case, it's extremely unlikely the Borough would approve a variance...in fact, it's almost an assured "no" based on my preliminary conversations with the code officer. The actual written code pretty much confirms that, too. They enforced it on the neighbor for her garage in recent years, even with an existing structure "back there" pretty much already on the property line. In the larger Borough next door, pre-existing almost automagically grants a variance for new structures. Honestly, I'm not going to worry too much about it and I'm thankful that I can have the experience of putting up a shop "from scratch" when the money becomes available.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #80
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    Ever onward Jim. In retrospect I am happy about the delay in building. That time allowed me to let a lot of things percolate to the surface to be mentally inspected, modified, or rejected. By the time I got to actual building I had a much better idea of what was really important to me. The decision to add a lean-to for the DC and use that space differently was one but, there were plenty of others. Enjoy the journey and benefit from the to plan, re-work and flesh out things before you start.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  6. #81
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    That's exactly how I'm approaching this, Glenn...planning and re=planning and saying "that's just stupid" and....and... and... In the end, it will work out just fine and the journey is going to be fun, even when there are challenges or sudden "D'oh!" moments.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #82
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    Mar 2003
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    Silly me...it dawned on me this morning that I hadn't figured the "out of sight, out of mind" miter saw that was parked in the upstairs of the old shop into my temporary shop plan. Fortunately, it's on a portable stand these days and I'll find a place to tuck it in. I hate going back to using it "in" the shop because it's such a messy tool, but I kinda have to do that, given I will not have another slider until a new shop is in the backyard. I'm thinking I may park/store my dedicated guitar bench in the shed outback to free up a little space as I can do what I do on that bench on my main bench and my aux bench has the down-draft setup that will be more important in a shop directly attached to the house. I gotta have a parking spot for the router table, too. And that...is how things tend to evolve.

    -----

    Oh, and I picked up my permit today for the sub-panel. That's getting installed on Monday morning by a licensed electrician and once the required inspection is done, I can get the circuits in to make things come alive. Finally.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 06-18-2021 at 7:48 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #83
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    Aug 2009
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    Colorado Springs
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    Down the line, going with another MiniMax slider Jim?

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Snider View Post
    Down the line, going with another MiniMax slider Jim?
    Yes, that's the plan; most likely an SC-3C. It's a shorter stroke than the S315WS I had, but when I considered my actual use, that's really not an issue and I'll benefit from the footprint.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
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    Jim
    Your move includes a lot of excess material plus an abundance of recyclable stuff. Discipline in this area can make a space more efficient. Will the new shop include upstairs lumber storage? That seems like a lot of extra work for an old man, (which will be soon enough) plus extra facility cost. Can you adapt to having very little material on hand?

    Congrats on the move and I envy your energy.

  11. #86
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    Mar 2003
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    Tom, vertical storage is planned for materials...it's a primary reason why the walls will be taller. I will not need an upstairs to accommodate what I have or will add to it, where it was necessary at the old property because of limited space "in" the shop due to a stairwell, etc. The old shop was 21' x 30' x 8' less the stairwell footprint and DC/compressor closet effect. The current plan for the new building is 24' x 36' x10'. There will still be a separate room at one end for the DC and compressor but that affords storage space above opportunity, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #87
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    Feb 2010
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    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
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    Not sure if you mentioned about your ceiling plans in new shop. For your area that you're planning vertical lumber storage, you could choose to "skip a truss" (entails basically doubling up trusses, or otherwise increasing load capacity, on either side of a planned higher-ceiling space, and spanning between them with upsized connectors) to enable a space (say the first 8 feet of your building measured from one gable end) to have height all the way to the roof deck. Then the rest of your shop could have flat ceiling at your 10 foot height. (you would of course want the truss engineer to guide your builder on this)
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  13. #88
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    Mar 2003
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    Bob, two of the three different kinds of buildings I'm considering already have wider spaced trusses..post frame wood and post frame steel. Either of those choices "likely" would get a closed cell spray foam envelope including under the roof. But even with a flat ceiling in any kind of building, 10' is more than enough for my needs and doesn't get into trouble with zoning and building heights. I don't tend to buy material longer than that and rarely even longer than 8' 6" or so.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #89
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    Jim
    I agree with your building plan. Keeping it simple will save time and money. And a crew that puts up the same basic building shell over and over again will be done in days.

  15. #90
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    Yes, that's one of the appeals of post-frame to me, both wood and metal versions. The crews build them day-in/day out and they go up really quick. That's a nice thing given that the "dance" with the local jurisdiction takes a bit of time and once you get the go-ahead it's nice to have some really visible "go ahead" darn quickly! The factory panel built buildings are similar...Glenn's Tuff Shed build is a good example THey go up very quick, too, although the fully enclosed shell takes a little longer than post frame, but not a whole lot.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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