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Thread: cutting paper

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
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    Santa Barbara, CA
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    37

    cutting paper

    I like to write a journal and I have a leather journal that I have used for almost 2 decades. I was able to get refills for it for years and would refill it 3-4 times a year. The manufacturer stopped making that size about 3 yeas ago and I don't want to change the leather cover. Trust me I have looked EVERYWHERE for refills this size, but the guy that made them originally also made his own refills from home made paper. I have found refills close, but the paper was not good for a fountain pen, and that is all I ever use.

    So, what I have been doing is getting 11x14 paper and cutting it to 9 1/4 x 11 1/2 (yes, I know regular paper is almost that size, but I want it to fit in my leather binder), then fold it in half and bind it myself with waxed thread. Been quite happy with that. But it looks odd, the sheet the most inside is larger than the outside sheet when folded in half because of the extra length the outside sheet has to do to go around the first one. So I have been binding it in small sections, like 8 pages at a time and then binding all those 8 page books together. It takes me a afternoon to do it all.

    I was thinking of doing the binding and then passing it on the table saw to even it all up, after all paper is wood right . The total thickness is about 1 1/2" and I have 3hp saw. My concern is that the individual pages will rip and shred, so now thinking of a sled like jig that can hold and compress the pages together to cut them. Or band saw but I think that would leave a rough edge.

    I did create a small jig for the drill press, that I use to drill 1/16" holes for the sewing that worked out ok, but was/is harder to drill through than I expected making me wonder about cutting.

  2. #2
    Make a quick jig. Take 2 pieces of MDF and sandwich 30-40 sheets of paper in between and run it through your table saw and bandsaw. See how the cut performs. My guess it you'd definitely need to sandwich the paper between something to keep a clean cut.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    I'd try cutting the paper with a knife. Bind the paper into a book. Put a straightedge along one edge to guide a sharp knife. Each pass with the knife probably cuts ten sheets or so. Multiple passes cuts the whole book. I'd use a sheetrock knife with disposable blades.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    Silicon Valley, CA
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    918
    It's been eons ago, but I briefly worked in a HS print shop. We had a paper shear (not sure of an official name, but what we called it) that was basically a cross between a paper cutter and a hydraulic press. It was huge and I'm not sure what its limit was but we routinely go thru 4-6" stacks, or multiple stacks across its 3-4' width, in a second or two. If you can find a shop with one, I doubt you'd be out more that a couple six-packs getting them to do a trim for you.
    Last edited by David Bassett; 05-12-2021 at 6:36 PM. Reason: spelling is hard

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Wayland, MA
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    Unless you really enjoy the challenge I'd go to a (real) printer and have them make up what you need from the paper you like. They should be able to trim it and stitch it to your specifications. I used to use a fancy paper calendar/to-do/note system but the incredibly expensive refills were nasty paper for fountain pen use. I went to a local printer who duplicated the pages for me with some improvements I made on wonderful paper. For the price of year's worth of brand name inserts I got a decade's worth.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Northwest Indiana
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    Since you have to trim the 11 x 14 sheets anyway--no harm in building a jig or two as Stewart suggested and trying the table saw and/or bandsaw. I'm thinking the bandsaw might surprise you.
    earl

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    SoCal
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    812
    Any good printer will have a paper cutter that will do the cutting in a couple of seconds (power blade). Take some original stuff to them and they should be be able to accommodate you with little cost. Be prepared to buy paper from them and give them some time to work it in. A shop that does bindery work would be ideal.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
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    5,777
    Look for a bookbinder & see what they would charge.

    There are bulk paper cutters such as this one https://www.amazon.com/Mophorn-Indus...1C50S8D8&psc=1 that can cut up to 600 pieces at one time - that are fairly reasonable to buy ($160)
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    As mentioned, you just need to find the right place. A good place can cut 4" of paper in one pass. 5 minute job to cut 1,000 sheets. Here's an option https://www.etsy.com/listing/6130206...RoCrSsQAvD_BwE
    Last edited by Richard Coers; 05-12-2021 at 10:27 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    As mentioned, you just need to find the right place. A good place can cut 4" of paper in one pass. 5 minute job to cut 1,000 sheets. ...[/url]
    I once had a print shop cut a ream of card stock into four pieces. Two cuts with a guillotine book trimmer, took less than a minute. Perfectly smooth edges - indistinguishable from the factory edges. They didn't charge anything.

    JKJ

  11. #11
    Since you seem fine with making your own inserts, maybe make a shear? Old planner blade and a hydraulic press?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Peoria, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Verwoest View Post
    Since you seem fine with making your own inserts, maybe make a shear? Old planner blade and a hydraulic press?
    To shear more than one sheet of paper at a time, it needs to be clamped down with a lot of force to keep it from creeping. Paper sheers are massive machines. Not like the one your teacher used in grade school.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New York, NY
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    If you look around on Fleabay or CL, you can sometimes find a used or vintage Kutrimmer guillotine for less than $100. Will easily trim a stack of 50 sheets with a sharp blade in one go.

    They're a little more expensive new https://www.talasonline.com/Kutrimmer-Paper-Cutter

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Camillus, NY
    Posts
    332
    Www.thepaperstoreandmore.com claims they will provide custom sized. Give them a call.
    Jerry

    "It is better to fail in originality than succeed in imitation" - Herman Melville

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    5,935
    Cardboard cuts well on a tablesaw or bandsaw but it leaves a fuzzy edge. I would think paper would be more so.
    Bill D

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