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Thread: Transporting slider saws

  1. #1
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    Transporting slider saws

    Iím getting ready to pick up a new-to-me sliding table saw and have a question about securing it to a trailer.

    Is it ok to run straps over the wagon? Or should I build a simple frame just higher than the wagon to keep downward pressure off the bearings?

    My gut says to build the frame but Iíd love to hear any other experiences.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I would put some blocks on the cast iron top to keep the majority of the strap pressure off the sliding table. Depending on your saw, i doubt pressure will hurt the table or the bearings much. Better saws are designed to handle hundreds of pounds on the sliding table.

    Also, you need to secure the table more than just the onboard lock. Hard braking can cause the sliding table lock to fail, and then you have the sliding table shooting forwards and backwards at high velocity. I had people suggest using wedges on both ends of the sliding carriage. I ended up wrapping the heck out of the table with shrink wrap/tape.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Kane View Post
    ..Also, you need to secure the table more than just the onboard lock. Hard braking can cause the sliding table lock to fail, and then you have the sliding table shooting forwards and backwards at high velocity. I had people suggest using wedges on both ends of the sliding carriage. I ended up wrapping the heck out of the table with shrink wrap/tape.
    This ^^^

    That machine will destroy itself in transit unless you REALLY secure the sliding table. The Italian machines come from the factory with steel mending plates at each end of the slider, that you must unscrew prior to installation. Our sliders come with these oversized plastic slugs that you have to drive out with a fair amount of force. I never thought of shrink wrap. That's clever.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys! I think Iíll run a strap around the sliding table (lengthwise) to prevent it from moving. And Iíll build a 2x crate around it to keep pressure off the sliding table.

  5. #5
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    Italian saw. Mending plates are already bolted in to secure the wagon from moving as Erik mentioned.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Italian saw. Mending plates are already bolted in to secure the wagon from moving as Erik mentioned.
    Awesome Jim!!

  7. #7
    I used opposing straps and a sheet of plywood clamped to the table and carriage. Belt and suspenders.

  8. #8
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    My slider was shipped with the wagon in a separate crate; this was installed during set up. There should be a way to up-bolt the wagon to make it easier and safer to transport.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilkins View Post
    My slider was shipped with the wagon in a separate crate; this was installed during set up. There should be a way to up-bolt the wagon to make it easier and safer to transport.
    Are you referring to the outrigger? The wagon...the actual sliding piece which is 9'+ feet long is not removable on the saw Jeff is picking up. The outrigger is a separate assembly.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
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    I was referring to the wagon/the sliding piece. My machine is a Laguna slider; no knowledge how other manufacturers attach their wagons, or if they are attached at the factory. I have the ability to make adjustments if needed but have not had to yet.

  11. #11
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    Mike, I suspect that most modern units do not have a removable wagon because of the bearing systems, etc. If I"m not mistaken, some older units, like that Martin that Patrick Walsh restored, did come apart.

    At any rate, Jeff and I got the beast loaded yesterday with minimal issues...other than one dolly breaking in the middle of the job. He messaged me last night that he made it home safely, too. I took a bunch of photos and will post them as soon as I find the darn cable I need to transfer them and make them pretty.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    Well, that was fun...and Jeff made it home safely with the "old girl" still intact. Let's just say that extra analgesics were called for Thursday night! LOL Here are a few photos from this "Creeker Visit" to my soon to be former shop. (tears...)

    Ramps to clear the door sill and the gap between the bottom of the sill and the driveway paving

    IMG_E9410.jpg

    Ready for Jeff to pick it up

    IMG_E9412.jpg

    What came next....

    IMG_E9417.jpg IMG_E9418.jpg IMG_E9419.jpg IMG_E9420.jpg

    IMG_E9421.jpg IMG_E9422.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #13
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    And....strappin' her down good...

    IMG_E9424.jpg IMG_E9425.jpg

    Obligatory photo of two tired dudes...and one of them had a 5+ hour drive to go...

    IMG_9426.jpg

    Bye...bye...

    IMG_9427.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
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    The last week and a half have been a bit of a blur, this is the first time Iíve seen these pics! Thank you for documenting our fun Jim!


    Iím so glad I had long straps that could go all the way around the saw and trailer! There werenít really any good spots to hook to with this trailer. But it had a winch (I spelled it right this time Jim!) and that made loading and unloading pretty easy.


    I unloaded the saw the next morning, solo:
    7F6ECE64-ADE6-4076-BFF3-988D44B815AD.jpg

    8624EC0F-915B-4413-A0B4-0D2C236CB897.jpg

    B6BF49BD-D952-43CC-8454-AFF1E68207A7.jpg

    2A9D2897-52FE-4447-8FF6-4665D9E72447.jpg


    After that last photo was taken I sat down with a buddy and a cold beverage!

    Now the real chore begins: how to rearrange the shop to accommodate this beast. Iíve always been able to configure my shops pretty quickly but this time Iím really stumped!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #15
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    Thanks for charing the unloading photos, Jeff.

    As to arranging the shop, I certainly understand that! If you have a flat floor you have more options; if you have a slope, you'll want the machine perpendicular to the slope as the first choice and with the slope as the second choice, shimming level either way. Sliding saws really do want to be level for smoothest operation. You'll figure it out, both relative to workflow and material boundaries in at least three directions. You'll need a hair over 19' for the full travel of the wagon and space along that pathway for the outrigger when it's in use.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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