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Thread: Farmhouse Dining Table w/o pocket screws

  1. #1

    Farmhouse Dining Table w/o pocket screws

    Hello all! This is my first post and will actually be my first build. I'd like to build this table, but I want to do it with more traditional joinery.
    https://www.ana-white.com/woodworkin...uss-beam-table

    Does anyone know if there are plans out there already to build this with m+t joints or another traditional method?
    I'd like to do the tabletop with biscuits, breadboards with mortise and tenon, and still need to figure out the best methods for the base.

    Thanks so much, I'm looking forward to becoming a part of this community!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    7,417
    Welcome to SMC.

    The link you provided shows all the dimensions for the table, so all you need to do is use M&T joints instead of pocket screws to put it together. If you don't already have a good book on traditionally joinery you should get one or two. They will show and explain everything you need to know about sizing and cutting those joints. The general rule of thumb is that mortises are 1/3 the width of the stock you are cutting into and at least three times deeper than the width. So if you have 3/4" stock the mortise would be 1/4" wide and at least 3/4" deep.

    Breadboard ends are a particular challenge. There are several articles in Fine Woodworking about how to go about it. If you search here you will find several posts, too.

    Good luck.

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    SW Florida
    Posts
    111
    Welcome to SMC...

    I think John summed it up nicely. The breadboard ends do require some special treatment to do them correctly so researching is a good idea.

    As an alternative, my daughter wanted a rustic farmhouse table and I took an unconventional route using dowel joinery instead of the traditional M&T's. The point being, as with most things, there are different ways to skin a cat! Good luck with the project.
    A wannabe woodworker!

  4. #4
    Thanks guys! I found a plan I'm going to use from Wood Magazine October 2020. It's made from Oak, but I'm planning on just using pine or something else that is more affordable.

    Sorry for the newbie questions...but I'm trying to determine the correct dimensions of lumber to purchase from home depot/lowes based on the attached cut list. Can anyone help?

    Thanks in advance for the help! Very much appreciated!

    This is the list of material that the finished sizes will be cut from.

    1-1/2 x 7-1/4 x 96" White oak
    1-1/2 x 7-1/4 x 120" White oak
    1-1/2 x 7-1/4 x 96" White oak *Plane or resaw to the thicknesses listed in the Materials List.
    1-1/2 x 7-1/4 x 96" White oak
    1-1/2 x 7-1/4 x 96" White oak
    1-1/2 x 9-1/4 x 96" White oak (4 needed)
    1-1/2 x 5-1/2 x 96" White oak
    1-1/2 x 7-1/4 x 96 White oak (4 needed)
    2 x 5-1/2 x 96" White oak
    2 x 5-1/2 x 96" White oak
    2 x 5-1/2 x 96" White oak


    cut list.jpg
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    Last edited by Mike Baylis; 05-06-2021 at 3:36 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    7,417
    You don't want to use construction lumber. It's not kiln dried to the 6 - 8% you need for furniture. It will give you nothing but heartache. Forget HD/Lowes, etc. and find a local lumber supplier. Ask them for a pricelist or to give you the price for two or three woods you are considering. Poplar is about as hard as pine, easy to work with, and usually pretty affordable. Soft maple is a lot harder and often a very good value, at least where I am in NYS. Depending upon where you live other woods may be a better value.

    When I need to buy lumber I buy it from a local millwork shop. Their prices are reasonable and they can provide milling services, too. Some lumber suppliers provide milling services, too. You didn't mention what your capabilities are but if you can't process rough lumber you'll need to find a supplier who can mill it into the thicknesses you need. Some lumber suppliers specifically cater to the market segment that needs milled lumber.

    John

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    1,094
    Mike, that looks like a nice table. I do not think the lumber you get from Home Depot will work best. The lumber may not be the quality you want ( knots and warp ) and the moisture content will be too high ( more than 7 to 9% ). A good hardwood supplier in your area would serve you better. Trying to save money on quality lumber up front usually leads to quality issues in the finished product. Let us know if we can give you more advice. ( Sorry John, I must have been writing this post when you responded )
    Last edited by Mark Rainey; 05-06-2021 at 9:30 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,316
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Baylis View Post
    Thanks guys! I found a plan I'm going to use from Wood Magazine October 2020. It's made from Oak, but I'm planning on just using pine or something else that is more affordable.
    If you do ultimately use pine on your project, please be aware that pine is notoriously blotchy when stain is applied. You will need to use a prestain conditioner to help even up the absorption of stain. You might consider using Ash. It is extremely durable, has a pronounced grain like Oak, and is usually a lot less expensive.
    Last edited by Brian Tymchak; 05-06-2021 at 10:02 PM.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    1,264
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Baylis View Post
    Thanks guys! I found a plan I'm going to use from Wood Magazine October 2020. It's made from Oak, but I'm planning on just using pine or something else that is more affordable.
    You might want to let us know, roughly where you live.

    For instance, I have 3 local lumber suppliers, that will sell to the general public and have much better choice (species), size and quality of lumber and are also quite a bit cheaper than the box stores.

  9. #9
    Thanks guys, I think I'm going to stay away from Home Depot/Lowes for this one. I live in Rockwall/Dallas, Texas and will try and find a place that has some better lumber for this project.
    I'll have all the tools needed....table saw, mitre saw, planer, jointer. Setting up a small shop in my garage before I get this started..tools arrive next week! I'm pretty mechanically minded...but this will be my first actual project.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    1,264
    I used to live in Lewisville, TX.

    There's a good group North Texas Woodworkers Asc(https://ntwa.org), that meets in Plano each month.

    Great source for finding out what's available in the Dallas area.

  11. #11
    Finewoodworking did a "hayrake table" a few years back. You can adapt those plans I'm sure.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Location
    Sothern Coastal Maine
    Posts
    16
    I agree that you should find a hardwood dealer. If cost is an issue, I would price soft maple. Much harder than poplar and in my area it similar in price to poplar.

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