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Thread: Short Stroke Sliding Table Saw or ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Waterford, PA
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    Short Stroke Sliding Table Saw or ?

    I recently sold an asset that will allow me to upgrade my table saw, so I'm trying to decipher the market.

    My older Grizzly Cabinet saw, with an outfeed table occupies a 5' square space. Additionally, I have 9' on the operator side for ripping 8' stock. I have to open the doors on the outfeed side to rip anything over 7'. The existing setup sits with the left side near a wall.

    After spending several hours, it seems that it is impossible to figure out the space a slider actually takes up when not in use. Perhaps I'm just too unfamiliar to understand the terminology, but I simply can't seem to locate the info.

    I'd like to have a minimum of 25" rip capacity to the right of the blade, and a minimum of 5' cross cut length. I'd need enough slider travel to cross cut 25".

    Does such a beast exist?
    Would a slider attachment on my existing saw allow the same?

    As I see it, adding to my existing saw leaves me with all the same drawbacks (poor dust collection, no riving knife). If I can fit a slider into my shop will it address these issues?

    Thanks for your insight.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    New York, NY
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    2,169
    With the outrigger removed, a slider with 60" of travel doesn't take up much more space in the shop than a cabinet saw. I've tried attachments from Excalibur and Jess Em on a Unisaw and no, they aren't at all comparable to the format-style SCM SC2c or C26g that I currently own. Would certainly recommend either machine.

    https://www.scmgroup.com/en_US/scmwo...imax-c-26g.660
    https://www.scmgroup.com/en_US/scmwo...imax-sc-2g.706

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    258
    I previously had a saw stop with a Jessem sliding table which was quite nice but in no way shape or form even in the same universe as my Felder sliding saw. I would second that the saw doesn't take up much more space if you remove the outrigger. Felder has a little trolley that makes removing it pretty easy (although I don't have one). The length of the sliding table can be variable. if you really want a minimum of a 5' crosscut length and 25" rip capacity you will be much more happy with a full size slider. When I want to process a full 4x8 sheet of plywood the saw can do that but can be contracted down to take up less space for smaller jobs.
    Richard Link

    **********************

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    There have actually been a few threads lately on this subject that will be helpful to you I suspect.

    I'm personally likely moving to a short stroke slider when I get the new shop built here in our new property...probably an SCM/Minimax SC-3C. I'll not go back to a "cabinet saw" from a slider at this point, although I may need to acquire something small to tide me over for narrow ripping for the 6-12 months I estimate I'll have my shop in a 21x21 temporary space. (AKA...the garage)

    The comments about removing any outrigger when it's not in use are spot on...they are generally easy to attach and detach and are designed to maintain registration, too., on a quality saw.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    258
    Lisa,

    Just one other thing. If you haven't had any experience with a true full sized sliding saw - it's really an epiphany. Working with a decent sized sliding saw with air clamps is so far beyond the standard American cabinet saw for many tasks (perhaps not all). The key is just not to try to replicate every operation the same way you do on the cabinet saw. There are a few easy to make jigs that also add a lot of value. The Fritz and Franz jig being the one that comes to mind first. I really haven't found anything I do that I wish I had my old Sawstop for these days and I've had the slider shoehorned into a two car garage for 10 years. With that said, a bit more space around the saw would be most welcome to take advantage of it's full capacity.

    Rick
    Richard Link

    **********************

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Gatineau, Québec
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    153
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    I recently sold an asset that will allow me to upgrade my table saw, so I'm trying to decipher the market.

    My older Grizzly Cabinet saw, with an outfeed table occupies a 5' square space. Additionally, I have 9' on the operator side for ripping 8' stock. I have to open the doors on the outfeed side to rip anything over 7'. The existing setup sits with the left side near a wall.

    After spending several hours, it seems that it is impossible to figure out the space a slider actually takes up when not in use. Perhaps I'm just too unfamiliar to understand the terminology, but I simply can't seem to locate the info.

    I'd like to have a minimum of 25" rip capacity to the right of the blade, and a minimum of 5' cross cut length. I'd need enough slider travel to cross cut 25".

    Does such a beast exist?
    Would a slider attachment on my existing saw allow the same?

    As I see it, adding to my existing saw leaves me with all the same drawbacks (poor dust collection, no riving knife). If I can fit a slider into my shop will it address these issues?

    Thanks for your insight.

    Lisa,

    I can easily relate to your query. I am one of many who have asked themselves the same questions and have pondered about various scenarios in recent months. I am a hobbyist working in a 14x20 feet work space. I have chosen to order (which has yet to arrive ) a Hammer B3 with a 2050mm (79 inches) sliding carriage. The model I chose will have a 1300mm (51 inch) cutting capacity on the right side of the blade.

    Precise drawings helped me compare the various configurations I was debating. When comparing the B3 with my existing cabinet saw, which also has 51 inch capacity to the right of the blade, the foot print of the new machine is actually slightly narrower (the sliding table to the left of the blade is narrower than the left wing on my cabinet saw). The sliding carriage will extend at both ends on the left side of the machine, but I suspect that I will get used fairly quickly to this (particularly in light of the fact that I will be working from the side and not the back of the machine).

    As stated by Jim, there have been numerous threads on this subject. In addition to Peter, Richard and Jim, many people have contributed to conversations on this subject. Various brands of equipment are available. Both Rod Sheridan and Derek Cohen own a shorter version of the slider (I believe theirs are 1300mm) and report to be quite happy with their choice. Your choice will be guided by the type of work you do. If ever at some point you need to handle long pieces you may resort to making a platform that sits on the sliding carriage and allows for cuts longer than the carriage.

    I am not associated to Felder or draw any benefit from my input in this conversation. I hope these few lines are helpful.

    Regards,

    J.
    Last edited by Jacques Gagnon; 05-05-2021 at 2:09 PM. Reason: spelling

  7. #7
    paid less for a good used slider than an Exaclibur sliding table woud cost. Saw is 1,300 lbs and five ways better than a cabinet saw including up to a 16" blade max, 14" with scoring, 3 speeds and awesome dust collection plus on this type I can still rip the way I always have, using the fence, its faster.

    Layout into other machines will help as one supports the other, have left it 50 plus inches for now and its burried beside the radial arm with the radial arm table being support for the fence if I ever do need that capacity and in the past have. Like always depends on what you build and want to build.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2008
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    Silicon Valley, CA
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    Lisa,
    I'd recommend watching this video on K3 dimensions:



    Matt

  9. #9
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    May 2012
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    Gatineau, Québec
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    Good suggestion Matthew.

    J.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
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    10,462
    As Jacques indicated I have a short stroke slider (Hammer B3 Winner Comfort) that will rip about 32” and crosscut a sheet of plywood

    It’s slightly smaller than the cabinet saw it replaced.

    You could never convince me to go back to a cabinet saw, and having a tilting spindle, sliding table shaper is icing on the cake.

    I can post some photos if you want....Rod

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Waterford, PA
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    Rod, Photos would be great. After watching Matt's video, I'm thinking it just won't fit in my shop, though everyone says it takes the same space as a cabinet saw. Perhaps I just don't understand them well enough.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
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    504
    Here is a photo of my Minimax C26. From the end of the rip fence on the left (from this viewpoint) to the end of the crosscut slider on the right, is 75 inches. As you can see, my shop is small. I put casters on the machine so it can easily be rotated if necessary. I am very happy with my setup and would not return to a cabinet type saw. Nothing wrong with them, just this one fits my style well.

    I must be doing something wrong as the photo does not appear. Sorry.
    Last edited by Ralph Okonieski; 05-05-2021 at 7:24 PM. Reason: Re-added photo as it did not appear initially.

  13. #13
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    May 2012
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    Gatineau, Québec
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Rod, Photos would be great. After watching Matt's video, I'm thinking it just won't fit in my shop, though everyone says it takes the same space as a cabinet saw. Perhaps I just don't understand them well enough.
    Lisa:

    Short of photos (other members will likely pitch in), here are some measurements taken from the manufacturer's data. Although this is for a Hammer unit, I suspect that measurements will not vary significantly with other manufacturers, as long as the table and sliding carriage sizes are similar.

    On a Hammer B3/K3 (one with a spindle, the other without) the 1250mm (49 inches) carriage will travel 770mm (30 inches) on the outfeed side and 907mm (35.7 inches) on the infeed side. When the sliding carriage is "resting" in the middle, the machine occupies a space of about 52 inches wide (this measure is taken at the end of the fence rail) and a length of 49 inches.

    My current cabinet saw has a footprint of 59 inches wide (when calculating 32 inches to the left of the blade) by 32 inches deep. In other words, a short slider will be slightly narrower (52 inches vs 59 inches) for a given space left of the blade and, slightly longer (17 inches or so) on longitudinal axis (this is essentially determined by the length of the carriage). Some models may possibly offer machines with a slightly smaller footprint, but I do not have information on this.

    I hope this helps,

    J.

  14. #14
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    Ralph:

    It appears I was typing while you posted your information.

    J.

  15. #15
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    Format saws can fit in some surprisingly small shop spaces.

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