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Thread: What Has to be Done to Get What One Wants

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    What Has to be Done to Get What One Wants

    My truck is 26 years old. Over the years my mechanical abilities have been able to take care of most of the problems. The first problem right after buying it used from a dealer was the fuel pump seized. This is supposedly common if the vehicle sits idle for a long time. It also happens if the fuel pump just decides to die. The windshield wiper motor was replaced a couple years ago and has stopped again. No trouble shooting on that so far to determine if it is the motor again, wiring, the switch, fuse or whatever. The heater is stuck on which according to the internet is common due to the plastic gate system to direct the heat to the cab or out to the atmosphere. What ever happened to having a water valve control the heater?

    Now the fuel pump seems to be back to unreliability. It scares me to think of driving it into town to pick up a load of soil and having it die half way home.

    So, a newer truck has been on my mind even before this one totally crapped out. BTW, the radio/tape player hasn't worked for years.

    My main desire was to have an eight foot bed, 4WD and one ton load capacity. It hadn't occurred to me these were not something the average Joe truck buyer was interested in buying. The one ton load capacity wasn't real important. The main reason for that was when we get potting soil one yard weighs in around a half ton and it would be nice to be able to pick up two yards at a time. The eight foot bed is for hauling lumber that is often in eight foot lengths.

    Candy talked me into getting a crew cab so we could bring others along. My preference was for gasoline fuel.

    Went down town to the car dealers and learned all things have been affected by the pandemic. Some vehicles are selling like hot cakes. Pick-Up trucks are like the new sports car. They may have a crew cab but a four foot bed? Six and a half foot is the new long bed? After talking to the sales person we were driving around, we did notice a lot of PU Trucks that looked like they couldn't haul a large load of groceries.

    After talking to the sales rep again on the phone and asking him to look around with other dealers in his ownership group, we talked again the next day and he said he got the listing on their next delivery of PU Trucks scheduled for later this month. Of the fifteen trucks they were allotted thirteen already have buyers. Of the two left, one of them was a one ton, crew cab, with an eight foot bed and 4WD. For me the only negative is the diesel fuel system.

    Oh well, guess we will be learning how to deal with diesel.

    Candy's only question, "what color is it."

    Almost all of the trucks that were on the lot the first time we visited were gone two days later.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 05-02-2021 at 7:07 PM. Reason: the usual errors
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fairbanks AK
    Posts
    737
    If you have room on your lot for a hauling trailer you can look at smaller trucks that are better on gas, only hook up the trailer when you are going after heavy things. My truck is only rated for about a half ton in the bed, but I have the right hitch (and trasmission cooler and 7 pin connector and so on) to pull 6000# when needed. Just an idea.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
    Posts
    632
    My pickup is also ancient... since I needed a 4wd vehicle for my wife we purchased a Jeep Cherokee... put a hitch on it and picked up a 3000lb load trailer...
    Much cheaper and more efficient than a new pickup...
    If you only occasionally need a pickup, a trailer is very useful...

    Still have my pickup, but rarely use it...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,316
    Yep, covid and now the chip shortage has really whacked the auto makers. So demand is way out pacing supply. I was looking for a new Tundra but went into a holding pattern when the covid hit last year. I was looking for a specific configuration but was probably going to have to order it. Last Wednesday night, I just happened to check my dealers inventory for the first time in months and amazingly they had the truck I wanted, even in the right color. Was at the dealer Thursday morning. There were less than a third the inventory as usual. Only 3 Tundras. I bought the truck on the spot, paying nearly MSRP because they had no incentive to deal. It stung a bit but I have heard of offers over MSRP being made so I figured I'd better jump on it. Definitely not a buyers market right now.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    It reminds me of my first vehicle, a Dodge PU Truck. It was either a 1949 or a 1950. When my mom was asked why they didn't know what year it was made she said, "back then, after the war, you were just happy to be able to get a truck the year model didn't matter." It was also my three older brothers first vehicle.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    10,751
    Jim,

    I've started saving for a new (probably used) truck. I tend to beat up a truck with farm use so for me a new one doesn't make good financial sense. My requirements are diesel engine, 4wd, single rear wheels, 6-bed, crew cab, 3/4, stick shift preferred. This would be just like my a '99 Dodge 2500 but newer. If I get an auto transmission my Lovely Bride might drive it a bit on the interstate.

    I've had trucks with gasoline engines and diesel engines. Now I prefer diesel. There is little difference in owning/driving - diesel fuel is available at almost every gas station. Just fill it up and go. Starting may be slightly different - my diesel truck, tractor, and excavator have a "wait to start" light that goes out when the glow plugs have heated up. The engines will all start anyway if you don't wait but that may be less kind to the engine. When the weather is warm the wait time is just a couple of seconds. In cold weather the wait time may be 20-30 seconds. The 8-cyl diesel truck engine gets far more miles to the gallon than the 8-cyl gas engine did, more than offsetting the higher cost of diesel. The diesel engine has a LOT of torque (will idle up a hill in low gear pulling a trailer) and typically at lower RPM so the engine can last longer.

    My truck has the 6' "short bed" which I prefer. For me a pickup with an 8' bed is a pain to park. Even worse for parking is a 1-ton dually.

    I found the short bed fine for hauling even 4x8 sheets of plywood with the tailgate down. I put a toolbox in the truck bed further shortening the usable bed. However, still no problem - instead of getting a tool box designed to stick up about 3-4" above the sides and tailgate, I bought one that sits down in the bed and the top is even with the sides and tailgate. This is actually better for hauling plywood and lumber since I can rest the front on the toolbox and the back on the tailgate. I've hauled a lot of lumber that way. It's a Dodge 2500 which I guess is called a 3/4 ton. If you need to haul heavier loads consider using a trailer. I routinely haul an 18' trailer with 8-12,000 lbs. (with brakes on the trailer)

    BTW, I had a 1-ton flatbed truck with dual wheels and easily hauled 2-3 tons. I would pull a big trailer with the tractor and use the tractor to load large logs on the flatbed - no problem with pulling up hills, breaking etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    My truck is 26 years old. Over the years my mechanical abilities have been able to take care of most of the problems. The first problem right after buying it used from a dealer was the fuel pump seized. This is supposedly common if the vehicle sits idle for a long time. It also happens if the fuel pump just decides to die. The windshield wiper motor was replaced a couple years ago and has stopped again. No trouble shooting on that so far to determine if it is the motor again, wiring, the switch, fuse or whatever. The heater is stuck on which according to the internet is common due to the plastic gate system to direct the heat to the cab or out to the atmosphere. What ever happened to having a water valve control the heater?

    Now the fuel pump seems to be back to unreliability. It scares me to think of driving it into town to pick up a load of soil and having it die half way home.

    So, a newer truck has been on my mind even before this one totally crapped out. BTW, the radio/tape player hasn't worked for years.

    My main desire was to have an eight foot bed, 4WD and one ton load capacity. It hadn't occurred to me these were not something the average Joe truck buyer was interested in buying. The one ton load capacity wasn't real important. The main reason for that was when we get potting soil one yard weighs in around a half ton and it would be nice to be able to pick up two yards at a time. The eight foot bed is for hauling lumber that is often in eight foot lengths.

    Candy talked me into getting a crew cab so we could bring others along. My preference was for gasoline fuel.

    Went down town to the car dealers and learned all things have been affected by the pandemic. Some vehicles are selling like hot cakes. Pick-Up trucks are like the new sports car. They may have a crew cab but a four foot bed? Six and a half foot is the new long bed? After talking to the sales person we were driving around, we did notice a lot of PU Trucks that looked like they couldn't haul a large load of groceries.

    After talking to the sales rep again on the phone and asking him to look around with other dealers in his ownership group, we talked again the next day and he said he got the listing on their next delivery of PU Trucks scheduled for later this month. Of the fifteen trucks they were allotted thirteen already have buyers. Of the two left, one of them was a one ton, crew cab, with an eight foot bed and 4WD. For me the only negative is the diesel fuel system.

    Oh well, guess we will be learning how to deal with diesel.

    Candy's only question, "what color is it."

    Almost all of the trucks that were on the lot the first time we visited were gone two days later.

    jtk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Longview WA
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    Thanks John, this information is helpful.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
    This is exactly what you're after, Jim-- a well cared for, dependable, 19 year old Ford F250, with 4 wheel drive, auto trans, AC, cruise, and no other power stuff. Has a bench seats and a 'extended' cab, but there's plenty of room for 3 people to sit back there plus 3 up front, and holy wonkies, an 8' bed!!
    mytruck.jpg
    This one has only 62k miles on it, it's on it's 2nd battery (no kidding), 2nd set of brake pads, and 2nd fuel pump. These are the ONLY repairs this truck has ever had.

    Too bad it's mine and not for sale -- But I see these, and newer versions of this same basic layout, in all brands, quite often.

    With the new car/truck market so volatile right now, if it were me, I'd be looking for a good used pickup that's outfitted how I really want, rather than settle for a new truck that isn't...
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Coquitlam
    Posts
    254
    With COVID, used truck prices have shot up a lot and new truck delivery is getting delayed.

    My little experience with trucks is limited to Ford, so some thoughts that may be of help.

    - If F150 does not meet you needs, skip F250 and look at F350.
    - 8' bed, super crew and gas will be easier to find in f350, compared to f150.
    - Given current used truck prices, there might not be big difference between buying a new truck in lower trim vs used truck in higher trim. With newer truck chances will be high that you will have peace of mind.
    - If you are going to drive a lot and haul less, consider F150 in 5.5 or 6.5 bed. You can tow a trailer if need be. 8' bed in super crew is going to be a pain to park, not to mention fuel economy with 350 will not be as good.
    - Don't buy diesel, specially F150. Actually, until and unless you do need to tow super heavy, don't buy diesel in 350 as well. With new environment laws, higher diesel (and truck) prices, maintenance, etc I don't think diesel is a good buy until and unless towing heavy.
    - 4x4: personally, I won't buy a truck that's not 4x4 but that's more of a want than need. if you are trying to save money and don't need 4x4 then consider 4x2. They are cheaper and will have higher payload.
    - trim: higher trim will translate to lower payload. I won't suggest going beyond lariat.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Coquitlam
    Posts
    254
    One more thing crossed my mind. If you are looking in your local area only right now, consider Seattle area dealers. I searched harris ford in Edmonds, there seem to be few 350 and several 150 on the lot.

  11. #11
    I'm in the get a trailer camp. With a trailer, you can leave mulch in it till needed. Go to a full service dealer to buy a trailer. The ones at the big box stores are too light for heavy work. Recently saw a two axle dump bed rental from Home Depot, hauling a couple yards of mulch. I've always, well almost always, had trailers, which I built. I have the metal working skills necessary to build them. Currently own five. Here vehicles are taxed individually. Because mine are "home made," they don't have enough value each for property taxes, even though I have to list them. Go figure? Rock Auto is the friend of anyone who owns an older vehicle. My tow vehicle is either 94 Ford Areostar (4.0 liter,) or 88 Mitsubishi Might Max (2.6 liter) pick up. It's not unusual for me to leave the quarry with a ton of stone on the hitch. I tell people I not worried about go, but whoa instead..
    Last edited by Bruce Wrenn; 05-03-2021 at 8:03 AM.

  12. #12
    Jim, your post could have been written down to the very words (with the exceptions of the gasoline preference and wife asking what color it is) by me. My 21 year old F360 developed a bad oil consumption problem last fall, and I elected to buy a new one. I was looking for the same truck you describe (for the same tasks), but when I inquired around, all I found was four doors and a short bed. To make a long story a little shorter, I ended up dropping the money to remove the engine and make the necessary repairs--replace rusted oil pan, rear main seal, turbo pedestal and seals. The truck is now dependable.

    I assume that you have a new truck coming, and I'm happy for you. Diesel's okay, just keep the filters changed. Keep us posted.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,680
    Diesels are great for a real truck. My one ton dually is 20 years old, and has 347,000 miles on it. Still runs great. I have replaced stuff that has worn out, but the worst year was less than a grand, and that was just a couple of years ago. I never put more than 175 on a gas burner.

    Mine is an '01, which was the last year they didn't even have an EGR circuit in them, and doesn't require diesel exhaust fluid. The first thing I did was put an aftermarket 56 gallon tank in it, so I can't separate pulling, and driving empty mileage. It gets 18.8 mpg regardless of how I check it. The truck weighs 7300 lb., and has pulled way over what it's supposed to.

    We buy new, and keep one for as long as we still like it. I still love this truck.

    GM fan here, because the independent front suspension makes even this one ton dually drive like a car on the highway. It does have an unstuck button. Lover of the quiet Duramax engine, and the Alison transmission.

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Thanks all for the comments and advice.

    It does have an unstuck button.
    Not sure what this means.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,680
    4wd button on dash

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