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Thread: Best 10 Inch Full Kerf Glue Line Rip Blade?

  1. #1

    Best 10 Inch Full Kerf Glue Line Rip Blade?

    I'm expecting to do a fair bit of ripping of hardwoods (Maple, Black Walnut, Oak, possibly Hickory) and would appreciate any recommendations. Price is not a factor, quality of cut is. I have a 5HP SawStop ICS to push the blade.

  2. #2
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    My favorite is the Ridge Carbide blades. Theyíve gotten very favorable reviews in head to head comparisons from what Iíve found online. My blades leave amazing cuts and they cut the hardest hardwoods like butter. While I donít cut enough to ever use all the carbide up, they have a very generous carbide tooth that can be sharpened many times. The main thing about that is I have blades I trust and cut great that all I have to do is have them sharpened and it will be exactly what Iíve come to know and trust for my cuts.

    I also think there are a number in this high end category that youíll find praises galore. Forrest is an excellent blade. Amana has great blades. Freud makes good stuff too. There are several.
    The good news is that the market competition offers us some great blades and whichever you buy will most likely be excellent.

  3. #3
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    Best blade...price is no object...

    I do not have a clue but look forward to the answers...

    Best "price is no object" ripping blade...

    I look forward to learning something!
    Too much to do...Not enough time...life is too short!

  4. #4
    I had ridge carbide sharpen an old blade and it came back better than new. So I agree they do good work. But I always just use a 24 tooth Freud ripping blade. When it is new, it will even crosscut plywood with minimal chipout. I have never seen a purpose for the 30 tooth "glue line rip". But with 5 hp you should be able to push it. I get glue ready edges with the 24 tooth as long as it is clean and fairly sharp and my technique is OK.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    I have never seen a purpose for the 30 tooth "glue line rip". But with 5 hp you should be able to push it. I get glue ready edges with the 24 tooth as long as it is clean and fairly sharp and my technique is OK.
    I run a 30 tooth Freud Glue Line rip blade on my 1-1/2 Hp Craftsman saw with no problem. I've ripped, soft maple, walnut, cherry, red oak and hickory in 3/4" thickness with no issues whatsoever. My saw is well aligned and you need a magnifying glass to detect any tooth marks. It is difficult to tell which is the jointed edge and which was just cut. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another one.
    Lee Schierer
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    I had ridge carbide sharpen an old blade and it came back better than new. So I agree they do good work. But I always just use a 24 tooth Freud ripping blade. When it is new, it will even crosscut plywood with minimal chipout. I have never seen a purpose for the 30 tooth "glue line rip". But with 5 hp you should be able to push it. I get glue ready edges with the 24 tooth as long as it is clean and fairly sharp and my technique is OK.
    I have used 12" Ridge Carbide crosscut blades before. Big honker chunks of carbide on those blades but they are 3,000 miles away on the other coast. Back to rip blades 24 tooth vs 30 tooth which is more prone to kickback? Anyone?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    I run a 30 tooth Freud Glue Line rip blade on my 1-1/2 Hp Craftsman saw with no problem. I've ripped, soft maple, walnut, cherry, red oak and hickory in 3/4" thickness with no issues whatsoever. My saw is well aligned and you need a magnifying glass to detect any tooth marks. It is difficult to tell which is the jointed edge and which was just cut. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another one.
    Thanks for that info on the Freud 30 tooth. Agree 100% on setup and alignment. I take it to stupid levels honestly but +- .0005 inch is up there with smoked tri-tip.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Coolidge View Post
    I have used 12" Ridge Carbide crosscut blades before. Big honker chunks of carbide on those blades but they are 3,000 miles away on the other coast. Back to rip blades 24 tooth vs 30 tooth which is more prone to kickback? Anyone?
    When ripping you want to keep the blade high to increase the downward pressure and reduce the tendency of the wood to climb up the low angle of the blade. The Freud rip blades have anti kickback lugs to reduce the chance of kickbacks.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    When ripping you want to keep the blade high to increase the downward pressure and reduce the tendency of the wood to climb up the low angle of the blade. The Freud rip blades have anti kickback lugs to reduce the chance of kickbacks.
    Not true. Doing so effectively turns a ripping cut into a cross endgrain cut. Imagine trying to drive a chisel across endgrain as opposed to trying to take a shaving off the face of a board. Ripping blades are designed to shave away long ribbons of wood not cut across multiple layers of fibers.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Not true. Doing so effectively turns a ripping cut into a cross endgrain cut. Imagine trying to drive a chisel across endgrain as opposed to trying to take a shaving off the face of a board. Ripping blades are designed to shave away long ribbons of wood not cut across multiple layers of fibers.
    That makes sense, noted.

  11. #11
    Guys I ended up buying a 10" Freud 30T full kerf glue line rip blade yesterday.

    I also have a couple of brand new 12" Ridge Carbide blades to exchange. I ordered a 12" table saw and the two Ridge Carbide blades a couple months ago. Then was informed the saw was on backorder 11 months not 2 months so I went with a SawStop 10" ICS. Ridge told me no problem exchanging them for 10" blades so I'll ask them to recommend a rip blade.

    Question: On that note ripping 8/4 vs 4/4 do you like the same rip blade for both or do you have a favorite depending on thickness?

  12. #12
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    Rip with the bandsaw, dimension to final using the thickness planer.

  13. #13
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    Another big fan of Freud's Glue Line Rip blade. Best ripping blade I've used. Much better than the Forrest WWII.
    ďTravel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  14. #14
    I have very limited to no experience with premium saw blades. However, I also have the Freud Glue line blade and it works great. Really does make a glue ready edge - very satisfying!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Not true. Doing so effectively turns a ripping cut into a cross endgrain cut. Imagine trying to drive a chisel across endgrain as opposed to trying to take a shaving off the face of a board. Ripping blades are designed to shave away long ribbons of wood not cut across multiple layers of fibers.
    So, if I rip 8/4 material doesn't the bottom half of the piece being cut have the same problem?
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

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