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Thread: WTB vintage axe or axe head.

  1. #1

    WTB vintage axe or axe head.

    Hey, does anybody have a vintage 5-6lb axe or axe head that they would be willing to sell. I'm using an 8lb maul to split firewood but I'd love a good vintage splitting axe. Thanks!
    Eli

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Hit a couple of garage or estate sales in your area. Probably won't take long to find a good old one on the cheap.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Listing your location might help.

  4. #4
    I'm in Fayetteville, GA.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    I have been through a few mauls in my day and an 8# head is definitely a tool for a younger man than me. I sold off all but one of my mauls at the last garage sale. The only one I kept was my Fiskars x27. I think they make (made?) an x25 and an x29 also. I am 5' 10", buy my clothes off the rack and the x27 is my keeper. I now do the vast majority of splitting cord wood for my woodstove with my visa debit card, 8-10 cords annually.

    If you try a Fiskars maul, it is all about velocity, not power. Us old guys can still swing fast even if we aren't swinging hard.

    Good luck and best wishes.

    Edit: an axe is for cross cuts, a maul is for rip cuts. I don't mean to be an @55, but splitting axe is not really a thing. It would be a compromise head shape that does nothing well. I don't bother with the general public when they wear that hat, but you have made it to here. If you are felling, limbing, shaping or chopping, you need an axe. If you are splitting you need a maul. Live long and prosper.
    Last edited by Scott Winners; 05-02-2021 at 7:36 PM.

  6. #6
    I agree with Scott. An axe “cuts.” A maul “busts.” Using a axe to split usually results in the axe sticking in the wood and the user having to exert effort to extract it, whereas using a maul with a more obtuse angle will force apart the wood with the grain instead of cutting it. It does require more effort on the strike, but if don’t correctly only one strike is required and one doesn’t have to fight to extract a stuck axe.

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    A few years ago, we arrived at the museum house we were working on, and found a Hickory tree blown down by a storm. I went to Lowes, and bought a cheap, 4-1/2 pound splitting axe/maul thing with a plastic handle. My guys liked it so much that they wanted to stop at Lowes on our way out of town, and buy one for each of them. I looked, but don't see it in inventory now. I did find this one on Amazon that looks awfully similar. It will bust a short block right apart, throwing the halves out away from where the block was.

    https://www.amazon.com/truper-tjr4-5...9&s=hi&sr=1-28

  8. #8
    Tom, it is the side wedge profile that makes that tool work like you described.

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    I had a maul very similar to the yellow Collins pictured above that was my favorite maul of all time until the Fiskars came along. IIRC mine had a red fiberglass handle and was purchased at the Team Blue home store. Might have said True Temper on it. Good tool, good enough I would certainly knod to user preference versus the Fiskars. For my local woods and my physique the Fiskars is a better tool, but I can see that one pictured working just as well for some other person dealing with some other tree species in some other climate.

    I am admittedly confused about how to categorize a froe having taken a stand. I learned it that if the edge of the tool is making the cut it is an axe. Adzes, specialized axe the way I learned it from grandpa. Broad Axe, only used one for half a day in my life, that was enough, 98% axe and maybe 2% maul in actual use on a pretty straight log. Same grandpa, if the cut is advancing ahead of the edge it is a wedge, and if the wedge has a handle on it it is a maul. I dunno if that same grandpa would call a froe a kind of maul or not and he has been dead 40 some years now. He liked hickory for switches, I remember that for sure.

    Pulling a stuck axe head out of a piece of wood that failed to split is very hard on the handle.

  10. #10
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    There's an Atlanta CL listing for what looks to be that very Truper axe right now for $17. I'd provide a link but I think that's frowned upon. Easy enough for the OP to search CL locally.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Keeton View Post
    Tom, it is the side wedge profile that makes that tool work like you described.
    I think it must be what sends the halves flying. That, and the light weight had makes a higher swing speed come naturally.

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