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Thread: Using black locust wet?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Using black locust wet?

    I have a friend making some Adirondack chairs and he doesn't care for the price of white oak.
    I just saw a post for someone selling black locust that looks really nice, but I presume it is fresh cut.
    I have used it wet as firewood and it burns great. That makes me think that maybe it can be used as lumber fresh. I mean it is only Adirondack chairs, not fine furniture. What do you think?

  2. #2
    As long as you're not gluing it should work. You will likely have to tighten the screws as it dries out.

    Might stay straighter than if you dry boards from the fence posts.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2003
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    San Francisco, CA
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    Way way better than pressure treat!!! Go for it!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    WNY
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    I made an outdoor bench with AD black locust. The thick members cracked within a few days after I sat it outside and the sun got on it. Maybe 1" stock would survive w/o cracking but I wouldn't bet on it. And there's no way I would run green lumber through my cast iron machines.

    John

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
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    Black locust is one of the most durable domestic woods available, however it tends to check as John mentioned. Kiln drying can help minimize the checking. There are sources of kiln dried Black Locust lumber and one I know of is here in Wisconsin. https://www.midwestblacklocust.com/

  6. #6

    Black Locust

    Quote Originally Posted by Wade Lippman View Post
    I have a friend making some Adirondack chairs and he doesn't care for the price of white oak.
    I just saw a post for someone selling black locust that looks really nice, but I presume it is fresh cut.
    I have used it wet as firewood and it burns great. That makes me think that maybe it can be used as lumber fresh. I mean it is only Adirondack chairs, not fine furniture. What do you think?
    I used Black Locust quite a bit several years ago. I built a set of patio chairs and table with mostly 8/4 stock. The items in the screen porch have held up well. Those items out in the weather grayed and cracked a little, but are still very solid after twenty years. The only downside (if you consider it to be), is that the chairs are very heavy to move and lift.
    Otherwise it is a great wood and I also am in wisconsin where it is used for fence posts because of it's long life.
    Stevo
    Last edited by stevo wis; 04-29-2021 at 10:58 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Falk View Post
    Black locust is one of the most durable domestic woods available, however it tends to check as John mentioned. Kiln drying can help minimize the checking. There are sources of kiln dried Black Locust lumber and one I know of is here in Wisconsin. https://www.midwestblacklocust.com/
    I will be in Madison next week, but it won't really fit in my carry on.
    They don't give any prices. Do you know what it goes for a bf?

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