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Thread: Oneida Cyclone - wall mount or floor stand?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Goleta / Santa Barbara
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    Oneida Cyclone - wall mount or floor stand?

    I am going to get an Oneida Gorilla Smart cyclone. It will be in what used to be a 2 car garage (but has not seen a car in 20 years) and on/near an outside wall.

    What has your experience been with doing the wall mount or the floor stand? If you were to do it over again, would you still choose the same?

    My main concern about the floor stand, although it seems convenient and easier to install (or tilt up), is that the intake pipe is centered at 6ft 6in, which means that i have to have an elbow almost immediately if i want to run the ducting along the standard height (8ft?) ceiling joists (collar ties?). I seem to recall people indicating i want to have a straight shot for the first 6-8 feet, and a sudden elbow would seem to immediately induce turbulence.

    Thank you in advance for any insights, Patrick

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Rockingham, Virginia
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    288
    My workshop is in our basement ground entrance garage (space for 4 cars about 30x36 - 100” ceiling) with a 16 x 18 work room off to one side. So, our conditions are similar. (I leave one side of the garage empty - we do not park cars there either - we use the upstairs garage for that.)

    I have had one mounted on the stand for 10 years - two different locations. Real key is you will have to measure your ceiling height - that is, will it fit with space for the motor? (Means you will need help to mount on the stand and tilt up - I had my sons the first time and the moving guys the second time.). Secondly, is there a 220 line nearby? Thirdly, pulling the waste container from underneath the cyclone. It has to be a clear area. As for the ductwork. My main intake is around 70”. I have some 7” duct that I split after a few feet in two directions to 6” and pipe down from there. At present I run an 8” jointer, my Sawstop Cabinet saw, my bandsaw, my router table, and my faithful Dewalt 735 planer, and occasionally my combination sander. I have never noticed any turbulence, but occasionally when I am not looking I may bump my head on the duct near the Gorilla. . I do not think there will be any turbulence difference between the stand or wall mount. Wall mounting has engineering challenges the stand will not have (strength of the wall, etc.)

    I bought most of my ductwork from Oneida - the wye’s and step downs cost, but the quality is good. I also bought a crimping tool - sometimes things just do not fit right or you may have to make a double male in some places. The straight runs will not come already assembled, but it is easy enough to do. From a spot near the the end of the metal ductwork run, install a blast gate, and then I attach plastic hose of an appropriate size - usually 5” to a spot near the tool and then step it down to what are usually 4” dust ports - wish they used 5”.

    I mounted the stuff from the ceiling by attaching 1x4’s to the bottom of the rafters (find out the spacing of your rafters with a finish nail and a hammer) through drywall will 3” screws and used metal plumbing hangers (the ones with the holes in it) to support the pipe - just put a small bolt through two opposite holes to lock it around the pipe or made a large “U” and connected back up to the 1x4 with a 2” screw. Works good.

    I think it will take you a while to get the duct work done, but you will be fine. Just remember to seal the joints with clear sealant or caulk and to put good expensive metal tape around any junctions. If you use plastic blast gates you can make them better by drilling holes at the bottom and putting in small screws, washers, and nuts through. They then become almost as good as the metal ones.

    Finally, plan! Measure - 2x or more. Think ergonomics of machine location and pipe drops. Realize Oneida, while reasonably timely, will not deliver over night. And, Good Luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Okotoks AB
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    2,780
    I used the floor stand because of sound isolation, but otherwise, I think the wall hanging bracket makes more sense. The floor stand also makes cleanup a bit more of a hassle.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    El Dorado Hills, CA, USA
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    176
    I mounted my V3000 on the wall, and it's great in terms of minimizing the space it uses, and getting at the dust bin. I do have a 10ft ceiling though, and even with that I have a 45-degree elbow right at the motor (Oneida designed the duct with it in there). Hard to imagine that's really causing any issue, but who knows. I do think I've created a bit of a vibration issue though - I have a crack in the stucco on the outside of the shop, with wood frame construction.

  5. #5
    I used to have mine on a floor stand. I did not like it because it made emptying the bin a little bit of a pain. It takes up a lot of space.

    I now have mine wall mounted (and directly venting outside).

    I saved money on the bracket by purchasing heavy duty wall brackets from Rockler and building my own plywood platform. I also built a plywood adapter for the exit port to fit a 7" takeoff flange.

    I much prefer the new set up.


    oneida.jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    5,951
    Mine is bolted to the wall of the shop. When it is running I can feel the outside Stucco wall of the shop on the opposite side, 24 feet away, vibrate. Makes me wonder about loose electrical connections. No noise in the wall, just slight vibration.
    As far as the factory stand being too low, raise it. Cinder blocks, milk crates or for vibration damping use old tires.
    I cut a door in the wall right at the dc so it is easy to get the dust drum out. My handtruck lives there strapped to the drum.
    Bill D

  7. #7
    I have an Oneida cyclone and had it wall mounted on a home made bracket. I moved it to a floor stand when I needed the wall space to park another tool. Works the same either way. I have an elbow immediately out of the cyclone that kicks the pipe up to the ceiling. It was designed that way by Oneida and I have never had any issues. I use my floor stand to hang lots of my parallel clamps on.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Goleta / Santa Barbara
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    809
    I am surprised to hear about designs with an immediate elbow; perhaps my prior reading was less attentive to detail 0 or understanding - than i thought.

    Gentlemen, thank you for the input. I think i will simply go with the wall mount and elevate it to have an initial straight run, as i have enough headspace since there is no ceiling sheet rock, just open rafters/collar ties. Your experience is much appreciated. Patrick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
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    2,696
    My 5 hp Oneida Gorilla is on a floor stand because I wanted to isolate the vibration from the house.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,781
    An elbow near the inlet of a fan will degrade fan performance (CFM). On a cyclone the effect will be on dust removal (% of various sizes). This is not as easy to predict and we have to trust the manufacturer.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    San Francisco, CA
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    Even if you use a floor stand, in coastal California you should tie the thing to the wall. Cyclones are top-heavy. Free-standing, they're a hazard in a big quake.

  12. #12
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    Nov 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    Even if you use a floor stand, in coastal California you should tie the thing to the wall. Cyclones are top-heavy. Free-standing, they're a hazard in a big quake.
    Jamie, very good point. Thank you, Patrick

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
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    2,554
    My 2 Hp Onida system is wall mounted with metal ducts runing to most equipment since it was relocated from previous larger shop. If I was starting over today, I would strongly consider using a floor supported unit on wheels and move to equipment as needed saving a lot of expense with ducts. Usually only connect to one piece of equipment at a time or if 2 are used, they are in close proximity and spliter could be used. Just another thought.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Okotoks AB
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Canfield View Post
    My 2 Hp Onida system is wall mounted with metal ducts runing to most equipment since it was relocated from previous larger shop. If I was starting over today, I would strongly consider using a floor supported unit on wheels and move to equipment as needed saving a lot of expense with ducts. Usually only connect to one piece of equipment at a time or if 2 are used, they are in close proximity and spliter could be used. Just another thought.
    Moving a collector around from machine to machine is such a pain & was enough to make me spend unseemly amounts of money on a bigger collector & permanent duct work. I thought a mobile unit would be fine, but I just couldn't live with it.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Palm Springs, CA
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    I wasn't able to use the long, straight duct for my inlet. I think I broke every rule in the book and had a home made 45° wye right at the inlet. In theory I know it must have degraded performance however that set up never seemed to cause a problem in practice.

    V3000.jpg
    Dick Mahany.

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