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Thread: DC on switch(es) or remote start?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    N. Idaho
    Posts
    1,140

    DC on switch(es) or remote start?

    Hi all,

    As noted in a different thread, I'm in the process of going to dust collection 2.0. I've had a Long Ranger remote to start and stop my system for a long time and it has worked well. Except for keeping track of the remote.... That said, I've been switching a single hose from machine to machine, so no dealing with blast gates. But I will need to have gates on my new set up where everything will be 'hard piped'. So I'm planning to switch over (pun intended) to using switched blast gates located right at each machine.

    I searched the forum, but didn't find an obvious thread on what folks prefer in terms of switching for dust collection and why. Curious what folks have and what they like and don't like.

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    1,267
    My Jet DC is still 110v and so I use an iVac switch to automatically turn on my J/P, Tablesaw both on 240v feeds and another swith for my other 110v tools.

    I also have the iVac remote to remote manual switching on and off.

    Had this setup for 6+ years, changed the batteries in the remote once in that time.

  3. #3
    While I dislike the physical format of my DC's remote (Jet cyclone) I would dislike 1000 times more having to walk across the shop to do that task. I have normal blast gates and can't comment on switched ones.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NE OH
    Posts
    1,668
    My simple-minded solution is to keep the remote dangling from the strap of my apron. I don't even have to look down to find it. Obviously won't work if you don't wear an apron....
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,954
    I prefer (and use) a centrally located control switch the operates a contractor for the 240v load of the cyclone.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    I have a 240V cyclone so I made a remote using a contactor that uses 120V on the coil. I then use a cheap "christmas light" type remote to turn my cyclone on or off. The cheap remotes can be readily found with multiple remotes which I then stick on stationart tools using stick on velcro. I usually just grab the closest one and throw it in my apron pocket while working but there is always one within reach. Having the contactor means the cheap remotes work as the contactor handles the heavy amp load rather than the remote. A lot cheaper and less hassle to replace than using the purpose made 240v remotes. I just checked and the contactor is $10 and a quick amazon search on 120v remote pulled up lots of multiple remote options for $20 or less.

  7. #7
    When I got my 3HP Oneida cyclone, they were having a deal where if you bought a second remote at full price, you could buy as many as you wanted after that for something like $10 each. I had been planning to hook up low voltage switches to all my blast gates, but I ended up buying six remotes instead and attaching them to the walls near the machines. It worked out to be cheaper and much faster than doing the low voltage switches.

  8. #8
    My 2hp HF has 4 gates in its piping. I use a cheap, like $15, remote I got from Amazon and keep the remote in the chest compartment of my apron. I bump it sometimes but otherwise it works well. Biggest problem is closing gates so my small DC isn't trying to suck from two at once (it will but not nearly as well).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex LaZella View Post
    I have a 240V cyclone so I made a remote using a contactor that uses 120V on the coil. I then use a cheap "christmas light" type remote to turn my cyclone on or off. The cheap remotes can be readily found with multiple remotes which I then stick on stationart tools using stick on velcro. I usually just grab the closest one and throw it in my apron pocket while working but there is always one within reach. Having the contactor means the cheap remotes work as the contactor handles the heavy amp load rather than the remote. A lot cheaper and less hassle to replace than using the purpose made 240v remotes. I just checked and the contactor is $10 and a quick amazon search on 120v remote pulled up lots of multiple remote options for $20 or less.
    Ditto this setup. The only improvement I would like to make with my system is a motorized blastgate at the tablesaw either operated from another remote or turns on when the saw is turned on. The remote I have operates 3 devices which is used for my rotary phase converter, DC system and air filter. I keep it in a central location and haven't lost it yet.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    2,638
    I installed a contactor at the dc and then dropped hardwired switches in four places around the shop at the most commonly used machines. I'm never more than two steps away from a switch when I need one (90% of the time I'm no steps away), I can always find them, and they always work. Plus they were cheap to install-- regular 14 ga romex and four-way switches. Could have gone with a low voltage control system but I already had the wire and switches so it was easier to do a 120v control circuit. I'm a happy camper.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    251
    Blog Entries
    1
    I went with a remote operated switch wired into a contactor which works great for me. Iím a hobbyist with a smaller shop in part of my basement (~700 ft^2). I have 2 remotes (RF) that are magnetic. They are very easy to relocate and stick on a machine when needed and are always close by due to my smaller shop. I bought the remote switch with 2 remotes for less than $30 on Amazon and I can add remotes for cheap but havenít needed to. Iím an engineer and develop equipment. I had some old industrial contractors but they can be purchased at a fairly low cost as well.
    The remote switch connected to a contactor is easy and works well.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,605
    I just use the remotes that came with the Oneida. My biggest problem is forgetting to turn the DC on when I'm using the Wide belt. My solution was to put a label on the Wide belt that says "Remote on?". It's similar to one I put on the bandsaw that says "Blade tension? - Yes/No". What I would really like is automatic blast gates, but that's a whole other story.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,463
    I use a centrally located push button station.....Regards, Rod

  14. #14
    Remote, what remote? Mine uses a current sensor mounted in the panel box, which controls contactor for DC. Based upon design in FWW, Aug 2000. Added a run after break timer to allow for cleaning of pipes.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Allentown, PA
    Posts
    92
    I did the same thing as Bruce, wishing I knew about the FWW article. It took some time to design and find the parts.

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