Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Last Week's Rust Collection

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    270

    Last Week's Rust Collection

    Last week, I went to an estate sale in our neighborhood not expecting to find anything of interest. I was wrong. Picked up a Disston saw and a Nicolson drawknife. Then went back the next day, when prices were cut by 50% and picked up 2 egg beater drills and a bevel gauge.

    The Disston saw is a D8 (as best I can read) thumbhole saw, 5 ppi rip, and probably one of the last batches made. It is sharp and cuts straight. I needed a coarser rip saw than the 6.5 ppi I have.
    20210421_162005_Burst01.jpg

    The Nicolson drawknife has a 7 in. cutting edge and removable handles. It needed some edge care, nicks in the edge and general cleaning. The handles are angled for bevel up use, unfortunately I prefer bevel down work. Still, its a keeper.
    20210422_112331.jpg

    The bevel gauge is a Stanley, fairly recent make. Works, nothing exciting.

    The big egg beater drill is a 2 speed North Brothers (Yankee) drill Model 1445, manufactured 1926 - 1931. I picked this up more because I was curious about how they worked and if I'd see a big use for the low speed option. It needed some cleaning of gunk and oil to make it feel usable and for the speed change to work well. Works well, but I don't see the value of the low speed option, but then I have power drills. Bits larger than 1/4" aren't all the easy to drill, let alone the 7/16" or 1/2" max. size bit. Its also pretty big and heavy at 15" long. This may be offered for sale sometime. Still worth getting to satisfy may curiosity. The handle comes off to store bits in it, the handle disconnects from the drill to get to the storage hole. There is no side handle.
    20210421_132212.jpg20210421_132137.jpg

    The little egg beater is a Miller Falls No. 1 drill, with a 3/16" chuck that has no springs (and never did have any). This is at the latest a 1912 manufacture, but I think it is from sometime between 1899 and 1910. The biggest clue to the earlier date is that there are no markings on the drill (manufacture name, Patten dates or model number). The chuck took some serious work clean it to work well, but then I also wanted to take it apart to see how it worked without springs. There was a fair amount of dig and gunk to be cleaned. It has a nice adjustment to take up slack on the crank wheel to keep it running well without play. It handles 1/32 nd to 3/16 bits nicely, but you have to push the chucks jaws back manually. The end of the handle unscrews for bit storage. There is no side handle with it. The last picture shows the chuck disassembled.
    20210421_131755.jpg20210421_131816.jpg20210421_131032.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,237
    Blog Entries
    1
    Some nice finds Richard. With removable handles it would likely be fairly simple to make a pair of handles for the draw knife that would angle it for your prefered bevel down method of use.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    270
    I had thought about it, more a long the lines of how to modify the current handles. I'll have to think and look into making a new pair. Thanks.
    Dick

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •