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Thread: Transporting Heavy Items

  1. #1

    Question Transporting Heavy Items

    I have a couple of heavy items I'm trying to sell - a 500lb jointer, and a large standing drill press (not sure the weight, probably 200-300lbs). I am relying on the buyer to provide the means of transporting each of these 2 items. I really don't want to be bothered with the details of transport. However, the ideas suggested to me by potential buyers so far make me nervous.

    Has anyone dealt with this before? I want to do this the safest and most expedient way possible. I'm thinking perhaps (worst case) a 3rd party mover who specializes in this would be a possibility. The shipment would be fairly local, and I'm willing to adjust my asking price to accommodate the added cost.

    Any thoughts on this would be appreciated. BTW, the items will be posted again (since I didn't follow forum rules the first time).

    Thx,
    John

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    John, I've bought and sold several pieces of heavy equipment (South Bend metal lathe, YA J-120 bandsaw, milling machine, metal shaper, cabinet saw, 8" jointer, drill presses). In all cases the buyer was responsible for arranging for safe loading and transport.

    As a buyer once the money changed hands, I became the owner of the equipment and it was my responsibility to get my equipment off of the seller's property. Occasionally a seller would help load but I never assumed they would.

    As the seller I've always been willing to help load but decisions about where to place the equipment, and especially how and where to use straps/ropes/other fasteners, I left strictly to the buyer.

    Hope that doesn't sound harsh--I've never had a buyer ask me to handle any area of the transportation side.

  3. #3
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    Hi John, This might be better posted in the Off Topic forum.

    One clause heard many years ago applying to the sales of many things is, "as is, how is, where is." This means it is up to the buyer to load it and take it away.

    The jointer can be palletized to make it easier to load up a ramp. If a person is buying enough lumber to need a jointer they should have a truck.

    My drill press was lain down on the bed of my truck on top of some packing blankets. Packing blankets are cheap at Harbor Freight. One or two should do the job. A drill press can possibly be disassembled for transport.

    My employment at one time was for a genius who was an idiot. My experience with moving things (parents had a furniture & appliance store) was to always tie down the load. He felt the lathe he purchased was, "too heavy to go anywhere." On a sharp left turn just before reaching his shop the lathe, being top heavy, decided to flip out of the trailer. He made me swear to never tell anyone.

    Don't take a check. If they have a good check, they can write it at the bank and bring cash.

    Good luck,

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Astoria, N.Y.
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    I had sent you two private messages and you never responded. Reason I'm saying this is because you obviously responded to other buyers but not me.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Milan Mitrovich View Post
    John, I've bought and sold several pieces of heavy equipment (South Bend metal lathe, YA J-120 bandsaw, milling machine, metal shaper, cabinet saw, 8" jointer, drill presses). In all cases the buyer was responsible for arranging for safe loading and transport.

    As a buyer once the money changed hands, I became the owner of the equipment and it was my responsibility to get my equipment off of the seller's property. Occasionally a seller would help load but I never assumed they would.

    As the seller I've always been willing to help load but decisions about where to place the equipment, and especially how and where to use straps/ropes/other fasteners, I left strictly to the buyer.

    Hope that doesn't sound harsh--I've never had a buyer ask me to handle any area of the transportation side.
    Doesn't sound harsh at all. Pretty much what I was thinking, though I've had people who thought they could fit a 500lb jointer in their SUV. I don't want to waste my time with that kind of stuff.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by John Buzzurro View Post
    Doesn't sound harsh at all. Pretty much what I was thinking, though I've had people who thought they could fit a 500lb jointer in their SUV. I don't want to waste my time with that kind of stuff.
    Hey if they want to try and fit a 500lb jointer in their SUV, let them try. As long as they pay before hand. You'd be surprised what strong-willed people can accomplish Just give them dimensions and tell them they can load it as they please. Honestly I could care less if they want to load it on top of their station wagon, as long as they pay for it first

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    I'll help people load something but when it comes to tying it down or moving it that's on them. If it's heavy enough so I need to use a lift or my tractor I make sure that I know how to safely lift it. I'm not going to be responsible if something happens once they leave. When I bought my planer (must be 500 lbs) I brought with me an engine lift and straps to lift it. The seller helped me get it onto the trailer and remove a couple pieces but I strapped it down and covered it with a tarp in case it rained. I don't think I would want help doing it (other than keeping a hook from falling off while tightening up a strap). That way I know I did it how I think it should be done and have nobody but myself to blame if I was wrong.

  8. #8
    When I had to transport a couple of very heavy tools, I rented a truck with a lift gate. For a drill press, I tied it well in a corner of the truck.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  9. #9
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    Two guys, a dolly of their choice and a low trailer would move those faster than you can imagine. Those are not big weights to deal with in the equipment realm.

  10. #10
    I sold an 8" jointer to a buyer on the east coast. I palletized it and got it dropped off at a local Fastenal store by a local hauler. Fastenal shipped it to a Fastenal store near the buyer for ~$200.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    I picked up a Clausing floor drill press from an auction last summer, all I needed was a hand truck and a 5x8 trailer with a ramp. The removal supervisor came along, but the only time he had to help was to give a push to get the wheels up over the edge of the ramp. A jointer should be doable for two capable people unless it has to come up stairs. I agree with the others, once it's bought it's the buyers responsibility.

  12. #12
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    If the buyer gets hurt while loading a machine on their vehicle while on your property, are you liable?

  13. #13
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    I wouldn't consider 500 pound machinery as heavy. I have a 3,000 pound lathe in my garage. It's not your worry. Just make sure they understand it's up to them to move before you take the money.
    Last edited by Richard Coers; 04-21-2021 at 9:51 PM.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by William Hodge View Post
    If the buyer gets hurt while loading a machine on their vehicle while on your property, are you liable?

    Good question, and part of why this makes me nervous.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    A truck with a lift gate or a trailer is the sollution for most equipment.

    My company has a rack body with a 5000# lift gate I emptied my grandfathers whole shop into it. Most equipment has a low enough center of gravity that a couple straps to prevent sliding is sufficient. Drill presses are the oddity they are very tippy. Just put it in the corner if its truck with high walls(box or rack) and tie to both

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