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Thread: What is your favorite piece of wood furniture you made or own?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    SoCal
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    I still smile every time I get a pair of socks or a t-shirt out of my G&G dresser or tall boy.

    IMG_5695.jpgCoD-Finished-2.jpg
    I always forget . . . Is it the letter "S" or the letter "C" that is silent in the word scent?
    - Glenn (the second "N" is silent) Bradley

  2. #17
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    Mar 2014
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    I'll pick a table I made back in 2012 for a production company. They wanted a "buffet table" for a conference room and I had carte blanche, as long as it was wood. The room had a lot of Herman Miller, and mid-century modern was popular at the time, so that was the starting point and I got an idea in my head that I wanted to see if it was possible to make a full-sized table without an apron, just legs and a top.
    I used ash for it relatively lighter weight compared to it's strength, and I had it professionally colored and finished. Offhand, I remember it is 28" deep, but I can't remember the length.
    Screen Shot 2021-04-21 at 7.14.31 AM.jpg Screen Shot 2021-04-21 at 7.15.07 AM.jpg Screen Shot 2021-04-21 at 7.15.35 AM.jpg

  3. #18

    Family chair

    This chair is my wife’s families chair made by Abraham Shove in 1805. It is written up in “American Windsor Chairs” by Nancy Goyne Evans. It was an every day chair in my in-laws home. I would sit across the room and just look at it and the geometry just worked for me. It was as they say, “pleasing to the eye.” Leaving the climate of NY State and now being the dry as a bone CA it is my wife’s bed side chair, but is still as tight as can be. It is so solid and yet so delicate. The point of the arm is only 5/8” across. My FIL said that someone about 100 yrs ago refinished it. I like it this way as can see the detail and I just marvel at it, and the builder.
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  4. #19
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    Feb 2003
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    Lewisville, NC
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    These bedside tables are probably my favorite. Some veneering, gentle curves and some buffing out a finish. They required a lot of steps but have served us well for several years. They are practical in their use but fit in with our bedroom.
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  5. #20
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    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Tobias View Post
    These bedside tables are probably my favorite. Some veneering, gentle curves and some buffing out a finish. They required a lot of steps but have served us well for several years. They are practical in their use but fit in with our bedroom.
    IMG_0920.jpgIMG_0934.jpgIMG_0928.jpgIMG_0927.jpg
    I like the look of the beveled glass in the top. It it to put items placed below on display? I can imagine putting the book I'm currently reading there.

  6. #21
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    Dec 2006
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    Toronto Ontario
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    Perhaps my Morris chairs, or my coffee table, or the small breakfast table my daughter made, photo of her with the table in dry fit included.

    That smile tells it all.Morris#1.jpgCoffee Table 010.jpgDry fit of Table Aprons and Legs.jpg

  7. #22
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    Jun 2015
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    Northern California
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    My Bengal’s cat trees. I made two, one for my apartment (shown) and one for my country house. Platforms are walnut, base is red oak, exposed columns are western red cedar. Two of the columns are Douglas fir and covered in sisal for scratching and climbing. The tallest platform is 6 feet high and sometimes, when he’s in the mood and wants to show off, my cat will jump up to it from the floor. And he’ll be 15 next month! The platforms have inserts of a natural rough fiber material and the whole thing is on locking casters to facilitate moving it around. Of all the things I’ve made it’s my favorite because my cat absolutely loves it and there’s nothing in the world that means more to me than my cat.


    Unfortunately the photos don’t do it justice, as it’s a large piece in a confined and cluttered space taken with a smart phone.F1D942AF-0035-466E-90F6-6E6C3A182746.jpg4E5449B2-8767-44D9-AA7A-7E9A448B56B3.jpg0A9F0EE9-FDC3-494C-9BB3-E5765DB389CA.jpg9076DD20-18EA-42C9-8976-E753232B8E1A.jpg

  8. #23
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    Jan 2009
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    Indianapolis
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    Meditation table. Simple design, but lovely wood.

    Meditation.jpg.jpg
    Brian

  9. #24
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    Jan 2007
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    Michiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    That’s a tough choice. I’m 40 years deep into a love affair with Arts and Crafts furniture. We’ve been fortunate to collect a number of pieces of Stickley (all from the Audi years) and a number of vintage A&C pieces from turn of the century Stickley contemporaries. I’ve made a few myself. I’m a sucker for QSWO. I’ll try to pick a favorite and post a photo.
    Tough decisions made.......

    For the one I own, a 1910 Cron-Kills (Piqua, OH) Slant Front Desk, aka Ladies Desk. Catalogue #1010. All QSWO, hammered solid bronze hardware, and original finish. This crappy photo doesn't do it justice. We found it in an antique shop near Lake Michigan and brought it home upside down in the backseat of a VW Beetle Convertible. It was quite an adventure






    For the one I made, this 2009 original hall table I made to kill time while out of work when the economy tanked. All QSWO with pegged through tenons.


    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  10. #25
    The 6 board mahogany chest sounds like a fine piece. That mahogany is the other ; and rarer one. Most of it was cut by 1820’s . Not as much
    figure as the other one, but about 20 percent heavier. Was usually polished not coated. The trees are smaller than the more common
    stuff.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    Here's a poor picture of that chest. We're kind of crowded up, in that room with furniture shoved in it for now, with my 105 year old Mother moved in with us, so I don't have much room to get to it. Sorry for the iphone rotation.
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    Last edited by Tom M King; 04-21-2021 at 7:27 PM.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    This desk belonged to my Grandfather. The roll top still works like a new one. It's probably from the turn of the 20th Century, and one of the newer pieces of furniture in our house. The dog is one of our stud dogs, who believes he owns the world-he does.
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  13. #28
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    Nov 2007
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    NW Indiana
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    My favorite is the Maloof style rocker. I enjoyed working with Bill Kappel who taught me how to do it. It was a long process and work but very rewarding.

    Two Rocker Pics.jpg

  14. #29
    Malcolm, that crib brings a smile and a tear, what a beautiful thing ! The big bed is great too. And I guess the mosquito
    netting come in handy.

  15. #30
    Jim, that is spectacular stuff. The “contact paper” people need to copy that veneer ! Then I could afford it . The elevated top is interesting
    but I think the metal curls are not quite up to the modernness and luxury of the woodwork. The piece has made me think of a term I last
    heard more than fifty years ago....”breakfast under glass”.

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