Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: Shop compressed air pressure setting?

  1. #1

    Shop compressed air pressure setting?

    Having just completed my compressed air piping installation I have to come up with a pressure setting for it. I was thinking of using 90 psi, the minimum required for the highest pressure device (pneumatic drawbar for Bridgeport mill) to eliminate at least one pressure reducing valve. Most of the other stations scattered around the shop are for air nozzles and pneumatic operated tools. The drawbar is only occasionally used so cycling shouldn't be an issue, especially considering there is almost 200 gallons of tank capacitiy. What pressure setting do you use for shop air?

  2. #2
    80 PSI.

    125 at compressor for air tools.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    In the foothills of the Sandia Mountains
    Posts
    15,733
    I have my compressor and air lines set at 125psi, IIRC. I use an in-line regulator to reduce the pressure running to my cnc router.
    Please help support the Creek.


    During the middle ages they celebrated the end of the plague with wine and orgies. Does anyone know if there is anything planned when this one ends?

    ---

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    springfield mo
    Posts
    232
    Blog Entries
    1
    130 to 135 if you had ever seen the aftermath from a air tank exploding , well i turned mine down alot after seeing that video .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    27,645
    90 psi is what I use unless I am blowing out a filter at which time I reduce it drastically.
    Ken

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    4,170
    Blog Entries
    11
    Tank runs up to 175 psi, main regulator is set at 110 psi, secondary regulators in shop and garage set as needed, max 110 psi.
    NOW you tell me...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    10,766
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    Having just completed my compressed air piping installation I have to come up with a pressure setting for it. I was thinking of using 90 psi, the minimum required for the highest pressure device (pneumatic drawbar for Bridgeport mill) to eliminate at least one pressure reducing valve. Most of the other stations scattered around the shop are for air nozzles and pneumatic operated tools. The drawbar is only occasionally used so cycling shouldn't be an issue, especially considering there is almost 200 gallons of tank capacitiy. What pressure setting do you use for shop air?
    I set my secondary regulator to 90 psi. So far that has been good for shop use and for working on farm/construction equipment. I have a least one tool that indicates 90 psi MAXIMUM.

    IIRC, the primary regulator/pressure switch on my 5hp/60gal compressor came set to around 160 psi. I lowered it about 140psi.

    200 gallon tank? That's large for a shop tank. Might be good to have it professionally inspected/tested occasionally. I once worked as an inspector for a gov facility and we tested most tanks large with hydrostatic testing. If a tank under hydrostatic testing ruptures it simply leaks. If a pressure tank under air pressure ruptures someone can be killed. For testing with compressed air we lowered the tanks into an underground bunker with heavy steel plates on the top!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    288
    John,

    Of the tanks you lowered into a bunker, did any rupture?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    1,534
    There should be a mechanical safety relief on the system that relieves before damage would happen. The tank should be rated (stamped?) for a pressure exceeding the max pressure the compressor can develop. ASME hydro test is often 150% of stamped tank design pressure.

    I set my regulator to 90 Psig.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    10,766
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zona View Post
    John,

    Of the tanks you lowered into a bunker, did any rupture?
    Not while I worked there, no failures with any of the three testing methods they used. Most inspection was visual, hydro, and halide leak treating. Testing with pressurize air was rare and a big deal - all work in that area stopped and anyone not involved was cleared out.

    BTW, one interesting pressurized gas they had in large quantities was fluorine, used there to make uranium hexifloride. The periodic safety training included a demonstration of what would happen if fluorine gas leaked and contacted skin. A strip of bacon exposed to fluorine burst onto flames! That always got everyoneís attention.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    10,766
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael W. Clark View Post
    There should be a mechanical safety relief on the system that relieves before damage would happen...
    That reminds me of the importance of turning off the compressor when leaving the shop. I turn mine on when I need it and usually didnít turn it off until the end of the day. One time I left the shop for a while and when I returned the pressure relief valve had failed and the compressor had been running continuously, long enough to get quite hot. Now I turn off the switch unless Iím staying close to the shop. A friendís shop burned to the ground when his compressor started running continuously.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    751
    assorted compressors all set at 90 psi leaving, all only turned on as needed
    60 gallon in garage is main for shop 150psi tank 90 psi leaving, only turns on when running wide belt sander or working in garage
    Ron

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I set my secondary regulator to 90 psi. So far that has been good for shop use and for working on farm/construction equipment. I have a least one tool that indicates 90 psi MAXIMUM.

    IIRC, the primary regulator/pressure switch on my 5hp/60gal compressor came set to around 160 psi. I lowered it about 140psi.

    200 gallon tank? That's large for a shop tank. Might be good to have it professionally inspected/tested occasionally. I once worked as an inspector for a gov facility and we tested most tanks large with hydrostatic testing. If a tank under hydrostatic testing ruptures it simply leaks. If a pressure tank under air pressure ruptures someone can be killed. For testing with compressed air we lowered the tanks into an underground bunker with heavy steel plates on the top!
    I was wrong about the overall tank or storage capacity. It's probably closer to 150 not 200 gallons. One compressor has a 60 gallon tank and the other 80. The remaining storage is in the piping itself. I always leave one compressor turned on auto but will in the future power down when not in the shop. The possibility of a relief valve malfunctioning never occurred to me. I also never gave it a thought about a tank rupturing. Fortunately the final location of both compressors will be in an area partially enclosed by concrete block walls with one wall open to the outside. It's also the area where my dust collector is located. Hopefully if a rupture does occur the force will be directed away from the shop interior.

    Thanks for all of the input. I never considered shutting down the compressor when away from the shop or the effects of a tank rupture. Good thing I raised my original question.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,923
    Running it above 125 or so is a waste of money and reduces continous flow rate. Regulate for a max psi slightly above the desired pressure then adjust pulley size so the pump runs faster but the motor is not working any harder then at the previous higher pressure.
    Bill D

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Running it above 125 or so is a waste of money and reduces continous flow rate. Regulate for a max psi slightly above the desired pressure then adjust pulley size so the pump runs faster but the motor is not working any harder then at the previous higher pressure.
    Bill D
    I'm not sure it wastes money. Higher tank pressure is a way to increase the tanks holding capacity without increasing size. We have a Dewalt that runs the tank pressure at 225, but line max is 125. It's works as well as a bigger tank machine in high use jobs like roofing.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •