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Thread: This is why I use liquid hide glue

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Posts
    425

    This is why I use liquid hide glue

    I'm in the process of building a storage cabinet for the kitchen. 44" wide by 72" tall, 4 sections, 2 up and 2 down with 3 slide out trays each and 2 drawers in the middle. Hickory veneered plywood for the sides and shelves/top/bottom with solid Hickory for the face frames, doors, etc. Using Hickory to match the existing cabinets.

    Assembled the carcass ok. The rails and center stile went in fine, but when I glued the outside stiles on (after 3 or 4 dry assemblies for fitting) evidently one of the Dominos on the left stile hung up and I didn't notice the problem until I heard the crack as I was clamping it down. By that point it was too late and I figured I'd look it over after the glue cured and see if it could be salvaged. It couldn't. It would have to be replaced. This is why I use liquid hide glue.

    Used the track saw to cut off all but 1/16" of the stile, didn't want to risk cutting any of the plywood side. Then by applying water and an iron to the thin slice of hickory left I was able to safely pry it off. Tomorrow I'll get a new board and mill a new stile.

    If I'd used one of the pva glues I'm not sure how I could have saved the project so easily. Sometimes I need all the help I can get.

    Cliff
    Mudhead: "Doesn't Louise count?" Porgy: "Only to 10, Mudhead."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    794
    Then there is the long open time and the fact that it does not slop when cured. Easier cleanup too

  3. #3
    And it is easier to scrape from inside corners when dry. And if you accidentally don't quite get all of it off, it is less finish-phobic than PVAs.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    823
    I guess I am missing something.

    With my table saw I bet I could have cut off the bad part within a couple thousandths of an inch.

    Seems like you are indicating that if using a track saw one cannot cut to the tolerances of a stationary saw. Perhaps then glue type matters.

    Don't think it would for me though...maybe I am missing something?
    Too much to do...Not enough time...life is too short!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Eagle, WI
    Posts
    55
    I think the point isnít about tolerance of the cut or the type of saw to use but rather that liquid hide glue facilitates easy removal of the remaining fragment of the stile.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Posts
    425
    Bill,

    The cabinet is 44" wide by 18" deep by 72" high. Not an easy or safe thing to try to cut on a table saw. Not to mention that you'd be sliding on the Hickory plywood side and risking scratches. By cutting it 1/16" proud I was guaranteed to be able to get to the original edge of the plywood with no chance of accidentally cutting too much.

    Cliff
    Mudhead: "Doesn't Louise count?" Porgy: "Only to 10, Mudhead."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    823
    Thanks for the clarification Cliff.

    I misunderstood what you situation was obviously!
    Too much to do...Not enough time...life is too short!

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