Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: Tips on lapping plane blade back?

  1. #1

    Tips on lapping plane blade back?

    Working on restoring/rehabbing some Stanley/Bailey planes. My #5 is done & working very well - I can get smoothing-plane thin shavings from it, though it is not destined to be a smoother.

    I am having trouble with my #4. After a lot of trouble getting the cap iron to mate well with the blade, I have ID'd the problem as a very not-flat back of the blade. Now, I could drop $50 on a new blade from Veritas or wherever, but I'd like to be able to true this one up. About 2 hours on the X-Coarse diamond plate yesterday improved it from a full 1/4" across the whole edge that wasn't flat to a single stubborn corner. Other than just keeping on grinding at it - anything else I could try to fix this? I have enough amazon points to get a "free" XX-Coarse diamond plate, and maybe I'll just do that to speed things up. It can sit on the shelf most of the time until I need it I guess.

    IMG_1734.HEIC.jpg

  2. #2
    Low corners are annoying.
    I would just camber this blade, use the 5 blade in the 4 and call it a day.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    885
    At a Lie Nielsen event a rep demonstrated flattening the backs of old plane irons by cyclying through three grits of sandpaper over and over - coarse, less coarse and medium. He claimed it's much faster than staying with a single grit until flat.

    I have not tried this so I can't speak to it personally, but I wish I had known about the method many years / plane blades ago.
    Last edited by Mark Gibney; 04-17-2021 at 11:53 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,967
    I use 120 grit on a 1m long granite plate. This makes for fast flattening.

    Website article here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Woodwor...%20Blades.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome Andrieux View Post
    Low corners are annoying.
    I would just camber this blade, use the 5 blade in the 4 and call it a day.
    That is both a smart idea, and depressing. I have 2 #5s, and 1 #4 - I can only turn one of them into a scrub. I (thought) I had already planned the worst iron of the 3 for the scrub plane, but I suppose I could check again on the one I haven't touched yet how bad it is and play swapsies. It isn't a franken-plane if I just swap the blade, right? (I also have a #7, but that's a wider blade so N/A for this)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gibney View Post
    At a Lie Nielsen event a rep demonstrated flattening the backs of old plane irons by cyclying through three grits of sandpaper over and over - coarse, less coarse and medium. He claimed it's much faster than staying with a single grit until flat.

    I have not tried this so I can't speak to it personally, but I wish I had known about the method many years / plane blades ago.
    Reaaaaaaaaaly. Interesting; it's certainly worth a try, as I won't lose anything but time.

    Gee - wonder where I could find a nice sharpening setup?
    IMG_1738.HEIC.jpg

    Made with a fancy Veritas Routing plane no less...
    IMG_1737.HEIC.jpg

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    I use 120 grit on a 1m long granite plate. This makes for fast flattening.

    Website article here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Woodwor...%20Blades.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Yeah - a granite lapping plate is on my wish-list. Primarily for flattening out the plane soles, but it would work well for this too. It's a definite option.

    Wherever did you find a 1m long lapping plate? Is that a cutout from a sink or something from a granite manufacturer?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,967
    It cost nothing .. zip. It was a cut off from a kitchen bench top supplier. Or use 1/4” thick glass on MDF.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  8. #8
    Evan, you could check out David Weaver's youtube channel. He uses a long piece of glass and a homemade jig to flatten the backs of chisels. It makes quick work of this job.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,607
    A search on these forums should bring up as much information as anyone would need. The good thing about this job is that it only needs to be done once.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,899
    I think your almost there and could probably start using it. But if you wanted to get a little bit further I suggest adding more pressure across the back of the iron.
    You should be able to get there shortly the price will be a worn dmt .
    Heres a trick from David Finck to me. I pass it on to you piece of hard maple across the back.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Aj

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,967
    It is relevant to make a note to oneself when starting out that the effort increases as one progresses.

    The reason for this is simply that the early stage involve workin the mountain tops, but progressively one reaches the valley, which is larger. So, the final corners or line behind the bevel are the areas which take the longest to flatten

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    It is relevant to make a note to oneself when starting out that the effort increases as one progresses.

    The reason for this is simply that the early stage involve workin the mountain tops, but progressively one reaches the valley, which is larger. So, the final corners or line behind the bevel are the areas which take the longest to flatten

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

    Yep - same reason My house doesn't flood at the top of the hill, even when all the neighbors are soaking wet. I am familiar with the theory, but thanks!

    I was busy with other things today, but had about an hour to go out and work on it this evening - I didn't notice much of a difference by taking it through all the grits and then back to the coarse. /However/ it seemed to grind much faster when I changed grinding directions on the blade by 90 degrees every once in a while. I assume this is the same reason we scrub in 2 directions - easier to cross-hatch the "hills" of the scratch marks than to keep on grinding the whole surface down. I didn't take a picture, but the size of the dip on the left corner is maybe 1/4 the size it was - making definite progress, and hopefuly another hour or two will take care of it.

    I need more exercise anyways - this is a lot of reps on the arms.

  13. #13
    You could just use the charlesworth ruler trick on that iron

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Nugent View Post
    You could just use the charlesworth ruler trick on that iron
    You mean put a back-bevel on it? Suppose I could, but I am ultimately trying to solve some faulty chip-breaker mating issues, so I don't want to confuse things while I'm still learning to sharpen & maintain plane blades.

    Good news is that a few more hours on the DMT plates has finished the work on 3 of my plane irons, and the 4th is almost done (#7 iron on the right)
    IMG_1758.HEIC.jpg

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Nugent View Post
    You could just use the charlesworth ruler trick on that iron
    You mean put a back-bevel on it? Suppose I could, but I am ultimately trying to solve some faulty chip-breaker mating issues, so I don't want to confuse things while I'm still learning to sharpen & maintain plane blades.

    Good news is that a few more hours on the DMT plates has finished the work on 3 of my plane irons, and the 4th is almost done (#7 iron on the right)
    IMG_1758.HEIC.jpg

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •