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Thread: Installed a mini-split in the workshop today.

  1. #31
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    For those of you installing mini-splits or window AC units in your shops, you need to consider providing some way to keep the sawdust out of them. A large box with a pleated furnace filter connected to the air inlet of the unit is the best way. If you don't do this, the coils in the indoor unit will quickly collect sawdust as the shop air passes over the cold and moist coils inside the AC unit, reducing the capacity of the unit.

    Charley

  2. #32
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    Charles, you are correct that frequent maintenance is required to insure the indoor unit doesn't get overloaded with dust. Some folks do create additional filtration setups...Jay Bates on YouTube did a nice job with that.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #33
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    So to close this thread off...I had a mini split installed !

    I was going to go window unit and cut a hole in my garage wall for it, so not in the door as I planned above, but the unit I wanted was no longer in stock by the time I chose. Just by chance, I spoke with a friend who has a mini-split in his house and he gave me the name of the installer that did it, I called them and got a quote, only a few hundred more than a Mr. Cool installed and done, so I went with it. Of course the unit they quoted was also out of stock a week later when I made the decision, so one size up (quote a 18k but unit and got a 24k, we split the cost difference so they lost a little on installation) and had it in about 3 weeks now. WOW, best thing I did to the shop since I built it 12 years ago. I also broke down and ran new power to the unit, ugly grey conduit on the outside wall, but that way, I didn't have to play with anything and its all legal, instead of splicing my 50AMP welder plug.

  4. #34
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    Sorry for late reply, just saw this Jared. We will be up in Hovland. Right now tools are stored in the garage of the house we purchased until We move up and build a shop. Iím been running a dehumidifier 24/7 spring through fall and a couple of box fans to keep air moving, plus coated all cast iron tops with paste wax and Boing Shield. So far, it looks pretty good, but will need to do something more permanent when it become home.

  5. #35
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    +1 on using vinegar to derust. Relatively fast 24-48 hours, depending on how bad the tool is rusted, cheap and safe. Have totally rebuilt 5 large old Delta/Rockwell machines using vinegar, works every time. Randy
    Randy Cox
    Lt Colonel, USAF (ret.)

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Lent View Post
    For those of you installing mini-splits or window AC units in your shops, you need to consider providing some way to keep the sawdust out of them.

    Charley
    To keep the dust out of mine, I bought some air conditioner filter fabric ($5) and taped it across the air input. I'll clean or replace it ever few months.

  7. #37
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    I don't recall if it's been mentioned and didn't scroll back through the thread, but Jay Bates created some actual filter boxes for his splits in the shop so help avoid getting general shop dust into the interior units' actual, regular filters. It's in his YouTube library relative to the build out of his current shop.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I don't recall if it's been mentioned and didn't scroll back through the thread, but Jay Bates created some actual filter boxes for his splits in the shop so help avoid getting general shop dust into the interior units' actual, regular filters. It's in his YouTube library relative to the build out of his current shop.

    Good call Charles and Jim. I positioned the height of mine to allow for a filter box add on if required. I planned it so that I can use a filter size I already use elsewhere. I plan to size them over the amount required so I can protect myself from myself forgetting to check them now and again.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  9. #39
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    I didn't use an extra filter box in my previous shop and relied on frequent cleaning. If I put a split in my temporary shop, I'll probably take the same approach for simplicity. I am considering doing the extra filtration for the new shop when I'm able to build it, however.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I didn't use an extra filter box in my previous shop and relied on frequent cleaning. If I put a split in my temporary shop, I'll probably take the same approach for simplicity. I am considering doing the extra filtration for the new shop when I'm able to build it, however.
    Just watched Jay Bate's video on building a mini-split box. Frankly, if I was going to do it, I'd build it half the size and use two 2" thick filters, or perhaps even 4" filters. Half the size, and should work just as well. His box is huge.

    I do like the concept of having air cleaning running all the time, at background noise levels (In Florida, that mini-split runs constantly for most of the year).
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  11. #41
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    Alsn, the reason for the larger filter boxes is to have less constriction of the air flow, not to filter better. It needs to be net neutral or better...you do not want to put any load on the attack of the air handler. Smaller and thicker would do just that and that would reduce the efficiency of the unit. The external filters are largely to capture some reasonable percentage of airborne dust so that the unit's filters and fins do not get clogged up with "stuff".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Alan, the reason for the larger filter boxes is to have less constriction of the air flow, not to filter better. It needs to be net neutral or better...you do not want to put any load on the attack of the air handler. Smaller and thicker would do just that and that would reduce the efficiency of the unit. The external filters are largely to capture some reasonable percentage of airborne dust so that the unit's filters and fins do not get clogged up with "stuff".
    Jim, I understand, but I think that could be accomplished with far less filter area than 4 filters. The intake of the AC is probably 1/4 the size of even one 20x20 AC filter. Or smaller. So doubling that should provide 8 times the area for air intake. Using 2" filters should double that again to 16 times the intake area. Shouldn't that be enough, even with increased air resistance from the addition of the filters?
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  13. #43
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    If you make the opening smaller and use thicker filters...the opening is still smaller. But as long as there's no meaningful restriction placed on the air handler inlet, you should be fine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    If you make the opening smaller and use thicker filters...the opening is still smaller. But as long as there's no meaningful restriction placed on the air handler inlet, you should be fine.
    What I am proposing is smaller than Jay Bates' setup (which strikes me as tremendous overkill in opening size), but still vastly larger than the opening in the mini-split. I would think that this would provide no meaningful restriction on air movement, but you really don't know until you build and test one.

    If my units weren't 10 feet in the air I would build one for kicks, as I like the concept, but not my idea of a fun task with my mini-splits. The way I look at this, you get two benefits - less need to clean the mini-split filters, and decent, background full-time air cleaning. Two nice benefits.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  15. #45
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    I think these external filters are worthy in a woodshop environment for the reasons you state for sure. As long as whatever the design is allows for no restriction of airflow relative to the air handler's capabilities, there's lots of opportunity to do what works for you. In your case, Alan, with them so far up on the wall, the "reduced need for cleaning" is a big benefit!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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