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Thread: Moving a 1600lbs machine?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
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    Portland, OR
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    Moving a 1600lbs machine?

    So, I am trying to wrap up my machine purchases and the Hammer c3-41 is quite high on the list, but getting it to my home is turning out to be quite the hassle.

    Hammer can't deliver it to my home if I don't have a forklift, and if I pick it up with a trailer, I'm at a loss for how to move it from the trailer and into my shop.

    I don't have any specialized tools for lifting and I've never done a move like this before, so I'd rather ask and get advice than reinvent the wheel here.

    Thoughts, tips, tricks?

  2. #2
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    Mar 2018
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    Orwell, NY
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    We will need more details. If you are in a garage you can hire someone with a rollback truck to pick it up from the depot (or wherever they deliver it) and put it right into your shop, but if you're in a basement and need to move it down stairs that's a whole other level of dread and existential angst. When we had a new boiler delivered that weighed about that much the delivery truck had a liftgate and they set the boiler on the woodshed floor (concrete slab) with a pallet jack. Then I jacked it up and used steel pipe rollers and a pinch bar to roll it into the adjacent boiler room and into position.

  3. #3
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    You might look into hiring tilt back wrecker. Obviously I type too slowly
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  4. #4
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    As has already been stated supply with all the details you can. What obstacles might hinder things, terrain, where it's going, property access and anything else that could possibly factor in.

  5. #5
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    Jul 2007
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    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    Hire someone with a forklift to unload it. (The easy way.)
    Get it delivered in a truck with a lift gate. ( stressful and harder work. more chance for trouble) Some liftgates are in bad shape.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hennebury View Post
    Hire someone with a forklift to unload it. (The easy way.)
    Get it delivered in a truck with a lift gate. ( stressful and harder work. more chance for trouble) Some liftgates are in bad shape.
    The liftgate might be dicey for a machine that size. Standard size lift gates don’t give you enough room to turn and maneuver safely. The oversize ones can work, but little guarantee you will get one of those. Forklift is much better option as Mark mentions.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  7. #7
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    Feb 2021
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    Portland, OR
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    Hammer/felder has made it clear that they will not deliver it via liftgate, it won't fit safely.
    ips
    My shop is a detached two car garage in the back yard. Probably about 100' of cedar chips to drive across to get to the garage doors. 82" high by 105" wide door openings.

    Forklift rental is ideal in my mind, but it would need to make it over the hump from road onto driveway, then down the driveway until it gets to the cedar chips, then across the cedar chips without issue. I've never seen/used a forklift that goes across flat, but mildly unstable surfaces, so I'm not sure if they are easy to come by?

  8. #8
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    I would look into a rollback tow truck, the one I have used locally here to pick up dead tractors for me back when I used to be in the parting out business also hauled sheds for the Amish and anything else. It was $75 for a haul of up to 15 miles or so, and he could put whatever he delivered right where you wanted it, smoothly and effortlessly. The wood chips would not be a problem providing the ground under them is strong enough to hold the truck without sinking.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2017
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    Santa Cruz, CA
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    A tracked skid steer with a fork attachment on it would do it...you would want to have to have someone with some experience to drive, though its not that hard.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott lipscomb View Post
    A tracked skid steer with a fork attachment on it would do it...you would want to have to have someone with some experience to drive, though its not that hard.
    Is this a spend 30 minutes playing with it and you are ready to go kind of experience, or is this a hey, you need a legit pro to do this. I've rented little skid steers and driven them plenty, just none with a fork attachment. I have zero fork experience.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachary Hoyt View Post
    I would look into a rollback tow truck, the one I have used locally here to pick up dead tractors for me back when I used to be in the parting out business also hauled sheds for the Amish and anything else. It was $75 for a haul of up to 15 miles or so, and he could put whatever he delivered right where you wanted it, smoothly and effortlessly. The wood chips would not be a problem providing the ground under them is strong enough to hold the truck without sinking.
    I wouldn't expect to sink, but could it get it into the garage with the low opening?

  12. #12
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    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    Hire someone with the skill and equipment
    Robinsons arrival1.jpgSAM_1888.jpg

  13. #13
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    Jan 2017
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    I may have said this a little off the cuff, because I have such a machine (Cat 247b) and I use it all of the time for my woodworking and metal machines, including off loading a 30" Tannewitz bandsaw, which is top heavy and weighs just shy of 2000lbs. You will want to make sure that the machine is heavy enough and strong enough for the job. Most regular sized skid steer loaders should be fine with 1400 and to be safe, you can use a heavy duty ratchet strap to make sure the machine doesn't move around on the forks. I would say if you have a bit of aptitude for this kind of thing, you could pull it off with a little practice on the machine before hand. They are easy to drive. But...take that with a grain of salt, I've probably got 1000 hours on mine. You want to avoid lurching, which hydraulic machines can if the throttle isn't feathered with finesse. The machine from the rental yard should be capable-and I'm guessing that if you have a property with a detached garage and 100' of cedar chips, that there are other jobs on the property that you can knock off while you have the machine.

  14. #14
    +1 on the roll back. I've had 3000# sliders moved this way. Then I did the last few yards with sticks and a pallet jack.

  15. #15
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    Peoria, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Hall View Post
    I wouldn't expect to sink, but could it get it into the garage with the low opening?
    A roll back can tilt the bed down and fore and aft. When he has it tipped back, he can back up so the bed goes into your garage. Then use the winch to slowly slide it down the deck. Have pipe and some 2x6s sitting on the floor and he'll let it down right on the and it will roll further into the garage. He'll pick it up right at the local trucking company, right off the dock. I had them bring home a 3,000 pound lathe, cost me $100

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