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Thread: Band Saw Blade For Resawing

  1. #16
    After watching Doug's Youtube link I happened to stumble on this one - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxvYXbeaLxE&t=191s. Amazingly clever !

  2. #17
    An update - ended up ordering a Lenox Diemaster 2 blade and cut my veneer slices yesterday. They came out fairly uniform and smooth. With it being a brand new blade and cherry not being an especially dense, hard wood I was a bit surprised at the amount of effort required to achieve the proper feed rate on a 6" wide blank. Only time will tell how long it will retain its sharpness.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
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    6,554
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Shea View Post
    I would look into Lenox blades. I've used their Diemaster blades for quite some time with very good results. The Diemaster is a bi-metal blade which holds up much longer than regular Carbon steel blades. I use the diemaster for general purpose bandsaw work and when I'm lazy I will just use it to resaw up to around 6" wide. When I am doing any resawing for a length of time or if the board is wider than 6" I switch out to their Tri-Master blade. The Tri-Master blade is the nicest blade I've ever used on a bandsaw hands down. Then again I have never used a different brand carbide blade but can't imagine that it gets much better than the Tri-Master. The Tri-Master is a pricey blade, especially for my 18" saw, but is well worth the expense IMO. I do not abuse this blade and keep it cleaned so hope it will last a long time. I use the 3/4" 3 tpi version.
    I have a 14" Rikon 10-325 steel frame saw. I recently bought a 1/2" 3 T.P.I. Trimaster. The only source I've found is Toolcenter.com.. This blade is .025" thick rather than the usual .032" or more so it should be easier to tension. I've only experimented with it, not done any significant work but I was pleased with the initial experience. I don't know if a cast iron 14" saw would tension this blade. John TenEyck has a homemade tension gauge that I haven't taken the time to make yet.

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