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Thread: chair question

  1. #1

    chair question

    Can someone explain this chair. looked in one book I have dont see anything like it.

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    Last edited by Warren Lake; 04-13-2021 at 2:29 AM.

  2. #2
    I think it’s late Victorian. Lot of that stuff ,I think , was not designed. Just made from shapes that the existing machines could make.

  3. #3
    thanks Mel I searched books I have but nothing there. I found this below that had a ton of antique chairs but dont see the same. Odd how the arms float with no support below them down to the seat. Its good quality and is quite heavy.

    https://www.carters.com.au/index.cfm...s-hall/?page=3

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I think it’s late Victorian. Lot of that stuff ,I think , was not designed. Just made from shapes that the existing machines could make.
    What Mel said combined with "Huh, wonder if this'll work" can produce some interesting stuff. I really like the chair - and the wood used for the back is great. I wouldn't be surprised if that piece of wood was the impetus for the design.
    You know, the worst ain't so bad when it finally happens.
    Not half as bad as you figure it'll be before it's happened.
    - Bob Curtin

  5. #5
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    It looks (to me) interesting but not comfortable.

  6. #6
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    I am 99% sure this is Victorian - my grandmother collected Victorian furniture and I've seen this before but I cannot verify the assessment for sure. If I remember correctly, it was god awful uncomfortable, but pretty wood. And much of the figure was actually laminate. I have a hall bench with storage in the seat in the same style that came from her home when we emptied it in the 1990's, and the laminate has started to come off. It was sort of disappointing to notice this was how its made. I am not sure what became of this chair, so I cannot go flipping it overtook search for any maker's mark.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by William Chain View Post
    I am 99% sure this is Victorian - my grandmother collected Victorian furniture and I've seen this before but I cannot verify the assessment for sure. If I remember correctly, it was god awful uncomfortable, but pretty wood. And much of the figure was actually laminate. I have a hall bench with storage in the seat in the same style that came from her home when we emptied it in the 1990's, and the laminate has started to come off. It was sort of disappointing to notice this was how its made. I am not sure what became of this chair, so I cannot go flipping it overtook search for any maker's mark.
    I was thinking the same thing that it might be veneered.

  8. #8
    They were experimenting with plywood chairs as early as 1830 (wicipedia says) The link you posted shows a bunch of “hall chairs”, that is
    an interesting subject in that they were used to park servants to keep them handy and fresh til needed. Also used by visitors while waiting
    to be received by house owner. I don’t think your chair is a hall chair....way too comfortable.

  9. #9
    the back looks like white oak but to the side you sit in its been veneered with stuff with more figure. I only sat briefly and it was not uncomfortable.

    My most comfortable chair here is a windsor then a second windsor they changed the size not as comfortable and dosnt look right as it was made for people with a broad beam.

  10. #10
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    Maybe if you stuff under the seat with horse hair it might give the sitter some support.
    As it is the front rail pinches the hamstrings and this will get old very fast.

    Cool looking chair, sort of a mix of Victorian lines and 1930s construction with the floating arms.

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