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Thread: Person Looking for Woodworker to build Tack Box

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Lewiston, Idaho
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I'm a little, um....unbalanced...right now. (Professor Dr. SWMBO agrees... )
    Just right now? Askin' for a friend.
    Ken

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Michigan
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    My wife has the addiction (to horses) so I am familiar with the issue. There are two types of tack boxes; the ones that stay in one place and the ones that travel to horse shows. The stationary ones can be more like a wardrobe with standup access and lots of space. The traveling ones are trunks that get dragged around, sat and stood on and generally abused. For a traveling trunk you can buy a nice tough plastic one that weighs about 20 pounds and if placed in mud or even a foot of water, keeps the contents dry. I can't recommend building a wood one for this use.

    Here's one I built. The door is ventilated so stuff drys.
    Tack Cabinet.jpg Tack Cabinet Open.jpg

    Here's a nice one her uncle made, about 60 pounds.
    Tack Trunk Wood.jpg

    Here's a plastic one
    Tack Trunk Plastic.jpg

    You might guess that there is never enough space for stuff.
    Last edited by Tom Bender; 04-15-2021 at 8:49 AM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    For a traveling trunk you can buy a nice tough plastic one that weighs about 20 pounds and if placed in mud or even a foot of water, keeps the contents dry. I can't recommend building a wood one for this use.
    I have built a number of tack trunks for travel/show use out of the dozens in total produced. Folks do not and will not use the plastic ones for serious show travel...this is a sport where "appearance" means more than anything other than winning ribbons. (one of the things that I did not appreciate over ten years of horse ownership) Mobile trunks just have to be constructed for the task. None of the units I've built for clients have ever failed. One was even a unique design that was "stationary" on top of a lower drawer unit during non-travel times and had a removable dolly system to convert to travel for a few months a year for that particular client. I do charge more for road-worthy units as they require additional structural consideration that adds time and (some) material to the build.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #19
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    Apr 2017
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    Jim I have no doubt that you build trunks that can take the abuse but two women are not going to lug one across a field. The plastic one has wheels like a suitcase.

    Now for high end shows with a sturdy groom along (or dad) a high end trunk is more reasonable. Or if the trunk can stay in a vehicle it makes sense.

    The last show I assisted at was a 3 day event. There were 40 women and horses with their stuff crammed into 12 empty stalls. Some camped in tents, some in horse trailers. The horses had temporary outside stalls. It rained and there was mud, and it was hot between the rain. It was a great party for the ladies who spent quite a bit of time in the tack stalls talking, cleaning and prepping. I left them to it and came back to pick mine up at the end. The plastic trunk was perfect.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Most of my trunks have double locking casters. For those that are "travelers" I use larger casters so they are more amenable to rolling in less than ideal conditions. The road-case type handles I use are also easier for carrying than what even commercial makers put on. Honestly, I've only ever seen on plastic trunk in use in any of the barns around here. No matter, different folks like different things. The trunks I make average about $950, depending on options with the low end at about $750 and my current high at $1850.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Villa Park. CA
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    Just an update - I heard back from the woman who contacted me and she is working with one of the woodworkers that I sent her information on. So it looks like it's working out. She said the woodworker and his wife have horses and they're working together to finalize a design for the tack box.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
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    Tom
    Those are some nice Tack Trunks you made. Nice work!The wardrobe looks functional.
    The Rubbermaid totes are good for a lot of things, but as Jim stated, there is alot of "show appearance" in the equation. I've seen the "equestrian" model in the catalogs, but for injection molded plastic, it's pretty darn expensive, and it doesn't hold very much.
    I think that folks in general have an affinity for wooden boxes for all kinds of storage. Not just horse stuff. People seem appreciate and admire a nice well made box. They're also good learning projects. To make a box that big, square, and functional, is a good test of skill.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

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