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Thread: Straight line rip on TS before jointing face and one edge

  1. #1

    Straight line rip on TS before jointing face and one edge

    Hi all,

    Recently saw a well respected carpenter on instagram milling some white oak into stair treads and his process was:
    Straight line rip one edge on tablesaw using a sled with clamps
    Joint face
    Joint one edge
    Rip the alternate edge

    Clearly he knows what he's doing as he has a lot of experience but I am still trying to understand the benefit for the straight line rip, since it's getting hit with the jointer right after? Saving possible time on the edge jointing or something I'm not thinking of?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    2,342
    save time on joining the edge if it was very out of straight...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,734
    I straight line rip on the saw in lieu of edge jointing, but I always do it after face jointing and thicknessing, at least partially. You can't get an edge parallel to the faces if they are not flat and parallel themselves first. Straight-lining is a lot easier on a slider, but can be done on a cabinet type saw with a sled.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Thank you, this makes sense, he must be saving some time on the joint by straight lining it with a sled one time, rather than making several passes on the jointer he can likely make one. Makes sense.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,429
    I often straight line and rip rough wood slightly oversized on a sliding table saw.

    It saves time and there’s no point jointing and planing firewood ....Rod

  6. #6
    exactly my approach as well. this is one reason i love mac's clamps on the slider, makes it safe, fast and easy to hold down rough boards for a quick straight-line.

    -- dz


    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    I often straight line and rip rough wood slightly oversized on a sliding table saw.

    It saves time and there’s no point jointing and planing firewood ....Rod

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mt Pleasant SC
    Posts
    711
    I had planned to post about that same technique and also do some light planing before face jointing saves a lot of effort and wear on the more precious jointer blades.

  8. #8
    I always rip to approximate size first. If you joint then rip, often times the ripped piece will immediately bow. Ripping first releases any tension before straightening.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    4,188
    If he's using stock with a live edge that first straight line rip lets him get rid of that, live edge can cause drama when face jointing, so might as well get rid of it first. He's just squaring up the stock. I like to straight line rough edge stock that has been roughly cut to length so that I can slightly change the angle of the grain. Especially useful on wider stock and things that will be seen as a way to add some consistency in appearance. Looks better when the grain is all similar, and lots of times adjusting that first rip really helps a board look better. Stairs would be a perfect example of a place to do this, maybe that's what he's up to.

  10. #10
    I sometimes use the sliding table saw for roughout, but the bandsaw is arguably safer and less prone to pinching with reactive material. The slider is really better suited for flat material.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    1,226
    My compromise to a slider, that I'd love to own, to perform this task.


  12. #12
    That's how he was doing it as well - makes sense now based on all the comments, basically saving some jointing time by getting the straight line done first. Thanks all.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Shorewood, WI
    Posts
    815
    One other reason: to align the edge with the grain. If the board will need to be ripped narrower and the edge has runout, it's an opportunity to fix that.

    The jointer straightens an edge, but the saw lets you decide where the straight edge will be.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisA Edwards View Post
    My compromise to a slider, that I'd love to own, to perform this task.

    I feel an over arm guard with collection would be better than the dust helmet

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,972
    In the absence of a slider, the JessEm guides do a wonderful job of preventing unwanted movement which effects a straight cut ...



    Otherwise, a parallel guide on a slider, if you have one ...



    This could be built into a mitre track on a cabinet saw.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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