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Thread: Time To Get A New Router Lift?

  1. #1
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    Time To Get A New Router Lift?

    The new cabinet saw is due to arrive in a couple of weeks. Original plan was to install the Jessum Rout-R-Lift in the present saw table into the new one. It works okay but it's probably over 20 years old and if it needs new parts, they may not be available.

    The idea of replacing it when it finally fails presents a problem - the plate size is 14x11, larger than anything I've seen on the market today. And then there would be the challenge of trying to make a ring to fill the void or having to replace the table wing.

    The other issue is the router installed right now won't fit any of the lifts on the market today. More $$$. And then do I buy a new fence? And now we're up to almost another $1K.

    What would you do?
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  2. #2
    Being cheap, I'd use what I have. Replacing the wing on the saw shouldn't be too bad if it's made from some composite (like MDF). You might get a surprise and the router and lift may work for another 20 years. But even if it only lasts another 10 years, putting off spending money is always a good thing.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  3. #3
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    I'm with Mike. Unless the failing parts are proprietary I would go for a refresh and tune up and see if I could get more life out of it. My Original PRL is only about 12 years old and came with a lifetime warranty. Have you pinged JessEm to see what their stand is on it? Building your own wing extension (or side-feed table or whatever we want to call it) to replace the factory one is fairly minor and you could route the opening to fit perfectly. Just to satisfy my curiosity, what router are you running in it.
    I always forget . . . Is it the letter "S" or the letter "C" that is silent in the word scent?
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  4. #4
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    If it works well and you like it, I'd keep it. The old adage "they just don't make em like they used to" may well apply.

  5. #5
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    Jessem is a fine company, I bet contacting them about your lift will yield surprising results for replacement parts. Save where you can, buy when you have to.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Just to satisfy my curiosity, what router are you running in it.
    It's a Bosch 1615 EVS, 3-1/4 HP, IIRC. Back then router plates were made to mount to the router base. Everything I see today seems to be made for routers that can slip out of their base and be inserted into a round clamp of some sort, mounted to the router lift. There is no round on the 1615.

    Part of me says the 1615 could be used for major freehand work but all the freehand work I do has been satisfied with a smaller Dewalt router I have. The Bosch is a bit of a beast that can turn you on a dime if it gets snagged.

    After reading the replies here, yeah, just use what I have. It makes sense. If it lasts another 10 years, that's probably all I'll need. I'm having a hard time believing I'll be doing this kind of work when I'm 80.

    Thank you for the thoughtful replies.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  7. #7
    Yeah, I use my Dewalt trim routers for a lot of things that I used to use my big routers for. I even bought two of the cordless DeWalt trim routers and I really like the lack of a cord.

    Many years ago, my first "big" router was a Craftsman and it only took 1/4" bits. Routers have really changed.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  8. #8
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    Julie, I've made tablesaw extension wings for router lifts before. 2 sheets of 3/4" MDF with a Formica top will work just fine. Not hard to do. It's what my cast iron router extension table top sits on. Not going anywhere.

    If there's any sagging, angle iron can take care of that, but I doubt it.

    I agree with all. Use what you have.

    BTW, I may have missed it, but what did you get for a cabinet saw?
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    BTW, I may have missed it, but what did you get for a cabinet saw?
    The Harvey HW110S-36 along with their sliding table.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  10. #10
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    Nice looking saw! I don’t think that Harvey is available in Canada but it is nice looking equipment. Congratulations!

  11. #11
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    Julie:

    Congratulations on the new purchase(s). I am sure you will enjoy this new equipment.

    I am in the same camp about keeping your current Jessem lift. They are well made. Correct me if I am wrong but your router will likely be located on the right side of the blade, given the fact your sliding attachment will be on the left? Knowing your skill level and your attention to detail I am not worried that you would easily find a fix if, down the road you needed to replace your router lift.

    Regards,

    Jacques

  12. #12
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    So, is this a router lift with a flat plate (replacing the clamps they now have) your plunge router attaches to? Don't think I've ever seen one like that. Generally they just mount the router to a plate and use it's own elevation mechanism thru the table.

    But if that's what it is ... what is the top plate made of? Aluminum, or the Phenolic they use on the newer models? If Phenolic, you could cut it down to size on the table saw, radius the corners, etc. Aluminum, best to find a machine shop. That's gotta be much cheaper than a new lift and motor, no matter how bad they gouge you ;-)

    And, are you getting the cast iron table for the router, or are you going to put it in a laminate extension? Do you have to cut that out yourself?

  13. #13
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    My Bosch router is in a woodpecker's 3/8" flat plate. Because the router has the trigger in one of the handles it can't be operated unless it's in one of it's bases. The plate was a little pricey, maybe $120, and you use the adjustment in the router (my Bosch can be adjusted from the top or bottom) but it's the standard Jessem/ Woodpecker size. But who knows if it's in stock right now. I believe Jessum makes a phenolic router plate for about half the price.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Grass View Post
    So, is this a router lift with a flat plate (replacing the clamps they now have) your plunge router attaches to? Don't think I've ever seen one like that. Generally they just mount the router to a plate and use it's own elevation mechanism thru the table.

    But if that's what it is ... what is the top plate made of? Aluminum, or the Phenolic they use on the newer models? If Phenolic, you could cut it down to size on the table saw, radius the corners, etc. Aluminum, best to find a machine shop. That's gotta be much cheaper than a new lift and motor, no matter how bad they gouge you ;-)

    And, are you getting the cast iron table for the router, or are you going to put it in a laminate extension? Do you have to cut that out yourself?
    Back then all router lifts I was aware of required the router base to be mounted to the bottom of the plate. IIRC, the recommended router was fixed base. Silly me thought buying a plunge router would enable me to remove the router when needed for freehand plunge work. But that thing is almost impossible to remove. So that's been its home for 20 or so years.

    The plate is aluminum, but there's no cutting it down. It's hard enough to remove the setup as it is.

    No cast iron table. $500 seemed a bit too steep for now. It was hard enough pulling the trigger on the sliding table but I've had one since the present saw was purchased and use it all the time.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

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