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Thread: Convert Jointer Guard from European bridge style to American Porkchop Style

  1. #1

    Convert Jointer Guard from European bridge style to American Porkchop Style

    Has anybody ever converted their european style jointer guard to an american style? I recently upgraded to a Robland NX410 Pro and have a 16" jointer with the european bridge guard, and I absolutely hate it compared to the american porkchop guard. I had the same issues with my previous Jet 12" jointer/Planer. I find it annoying to use and you cant use a push stick without lifting it up and over the guard.

    Id love to convert it to an american style porkchop guard but have no idea how. Would love some insight if anybody has done this before!
    IMG_7040.jpg

  2. #2
    A porkchop guard on a 16" jointer leaves an awful lot of exposed cutter out in the open air after the cut. I've done the opposite change on an SCMI before. The guard could never be tensioned to work adequately over the full range of the cutter width. I had to adjust the tension whenever I went to either extreme on the width. Also, I'm not sure you should ever be pushing down on the material as you cross from infeed to outfeed tables.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Moore View Post
    Has anybody ever converted their european style jointer guard to an american style? I recently upgraded to a Robland NX410 Pro and have a 16" jointer with the european bridge guard, and I absolutely hate it compared to the american porkchop guard. I had the same issues with my previous Jet 12" jointer/Planer. I find it annoying to use and you cant use a push stick without lifting it up and over the guard.

    Id love to convert it to an american style porkchop guard but have no idea how. Would love some insight if anybody has done this before!
    IMG_7040.jpg

    Sean,

    The technical school here switched out their guard to one that looks like the picture you posted but it retracted from right to left as the wood passed over the blades. It had a wedge shape on the right side so that a board would push it left when cutting. It worked really well but the instructor said it cost several hundred dollars. It seems like maybe what is pictured could be modified like that. Sorry i dont remember the brand but I am pretty sure it is european.
    Steve

  4. #4
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    If anyone is doing this and would like to sell the Euro style guard for a SCM/MiniMax 16" J/P I'd love to ditch the enormous porkchop. It's always in my way. Send a PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Moore View Post
    Has anybody ever converted their european style jointer guard to an american style? I recently upgraded to a Robland NX410 Pro and have a 16" jointer with the european bridge guard, and I absolutely hate it compared to the american porkchop guard. I had the same issues with my previous Jet 12" jointer/Planer. I find it annoying to use and you cant use a push stick without lifting it up and over the guard.

    Id love to convert it to an american style porkchop guard but have no idea how. Would love some insight if anybody has done this before!
    IMG_7040.jpg
    I have a Jet JJP-12. I just leave a gap maybe 1/2" between the guard and fence. I use a push shoe that's thin enough to fit in that gap. I had a 6" jointer previously with the 'pork chop' style guard. I found it fine for materials less than 1/2 the width of the jointer. I found 5"+ material on a 6" jointer hard to push the guard aside. As far as holding work down using the Euro guard I quickly learned to bridge the guard with my fingers. Also once I learned when flattening stock to apply 90% of the down pressure on the outfeed side the bridge guard became less of an issue. Different strokes for different folks.

  6. #6
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    To use a European type guard, use push pads.This allows you to push down on the wood on the outfeed table.

    Start the wood in to the cutter, face 12". Reach over the guard, and push the wood down on the outfeed table, which is the reference surface. Bearing on the infeed table with a push stick while trying to reference the outfeed table and get flat wood is a technique I never understood. I know people do it, people do a lot of stuff I don't understand.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by stevo wis View Post
    Sean,

    The technical school here switched out their guard to one that looks like the picture you posted but it retracted from right to left as the wood passed over the blades. It had a wedge shape on the right side so that a board would push it left when cutting. It worked really well but the instructor said it cost several hundred dollars. It seems like maybe what is pictured could be modified like that. Sorry i dont remember the brand but I am pretty sure it is european.
    Steve
    Suvamatic?: https://www.scosarg.com/suvamatic-pl...ard-protection

  8. #8
    Maybe a change in technique might let you appreciate the euro guard better? I have one and never use a push stick or push blocks. A push stick, in particular, seems like a bad idea since you can't concentrate pressure on the outfeed side. Using just your hands, your hand can naturally "ride" up over top of the guard as you move pressure from the infeed to the outfeed.

  9. #9
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    When I went to a wide jointer, I was so happy to be able to move to a bridge guard from the porkchop. What many folks struggle with is that using a bridge guard brings a different technique relative to one's hands while face jointing material that passes under the guard. Once you get that down and also start to enjoy the ability to pull a board back over the guard smoothly without damage, things get very nice.

    I honestly do not recall anyone going in the direction you ask about, although I could certainly have missed it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
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    Interestingly enough, Sam Blasco surprisingly prefers the American style. See video link below:

    https://youtu.be/Ca8ljZEoeuw

    Neither one is perfect.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  11. #11
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    It is a change in technique to be sure. There are variations of the pork chop.

    Sams jointer.jpg

    This is at Sam Maloof's shop in SoCal.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 04-03-2021 at 9:42 AM.
    I always forget . . . Is it the letter "S" or the letter "C" that is silent in the word scent?
    - Glenn (the second "N" is silent) Bradley

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    It is a change in technique to be sure. There are variations of the pork chop.

    Sams jointer.jpg

    This is at Sam Maloof's shop in SoCal.
    Isn't there also a Euro style guard made of segments (along the lines of the pork chop you show) so the segments drop down in front when the guard is retracted for edge jointing thick stock, rather than sticking out into the walking path? That's pretty much my only complaint with the euro style guard.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  13. #13
    Ive never enjoyed using the euro guard. I feel like I always get a bit of snipe at the beginning of a board as my hand rides over the guard and there is a subtle change in pressure. Also, face jointing wide boards with a euro guard can be quite cumbersome.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Franklin;[URL="tel:3112308"
    3112308[/URL]]Isn't there also a Euro style guard made of segments (along the lines of the pork chop you show) so the segments drop down in front when the guard is retracted for edge jointing thick stock, rather than sticking out into the walking path? That's pretty much my only complaint with the euro style guard.
    I have seen that but don’t recall the brand.
    I always forget . . . Is it the letter "S" or the letter "C" that is silent in the word scent?
    - Glenn (the second "N" is silent) Bradley

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by [I
    Paul F Franklin;3112308]Isn't there also a Euro style guard made of segments (along the lines of the pork chop you show) so the segments drop down in front when the guard is retracted for edge jointing thick stock, rather than sticking out into the walking path?[/I]
    Like this? https://www.scosarg.com/cps-txf650-surface-planer-guard
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 04-04-2021 at 6:03 AM.

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