Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 35

Thread: Help me spend my money

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,550
    I'm in the opposite camp from Jim on this one. I much prefer separate jointer and planers, if you have the space. Part of that is that I had a Laguna jointer/planer which I really hated. I have no doubt that the Felder combo machine is far, far better. And, I'm sure the SCM/Minimax is as well.

    I have the Felder A941 jointer, and find that I really never need larger capacity than 16" for my work. I find the tables more than long enough. Even for the very rare 8' board I have to process.

    I also have the Felder D951 planer with the Silent-Power spiral cutters. It's ~20" capacity is great. Also having the digital readout and controls on that is awesome. Just being able to type in a dimension (the Digi-Drive system) is incredibly convenient.

    Also, you haven't mentioned a bandsaw. Is that a need / desire of yours now?

    Also, serious dust collection is in order for those machines.
    Last edited by Alan Lightstone; 03-29-2021 at 10:44 AM.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    265
    Before you buy a Felder machine, become a member of the Felder Owners Group (https://groups.io/g/felderownersgroup). A lot of people can advice you about machine and options there. Occasionally, used machines from members are posted there for sale.

    I have a J/P combo machine, but I dislike the conversion, so bought separate jointer and planer. You have the space, consider separate and 3-phase machines. Having 3-phase power opens up more possibilities, a lot more. After you have 3-phase power, then you want to look at the metal mill, lathe, surface grinder, etc. so you can make tools for your woodworking machines.

  3. #18
    I appreciate everyone's advice here. Kinda leaning toward the Hammer at this point. If I grow tired of the conversion, would the Hammer J/P work as well as a stand-alone jointer if I just ignore the planer function (and eventually add a stand alone planer later)?

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    1,221
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Elkins View Post
    I appreciate everyone's advice here. Kinda leaning toward the Hammer at this point. If I grow tired of the conversion, would the Hammer J/P work as well as a stand-alone jointer if I just ignore the planer function (and eventually add a stand alone planer later)?
    Sure and in that mode you could add the long extension on both the infeed and outfeed giving you a lot of extra support should you need it.

    This is for a A3-31 showing the longer extension table. There is a shorter extension that does not use a support leg. I have this permanently mounted on the planer outfeed.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,683
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Elkins View Post
    I appreciate everyone's advice here. Kinda leaning toward the Hammer at this point. If I grow tired of the conversion, would the Hammer J/P work as well as a stand-alone jointer if I just ignore the planer function (and eventually add a stand alone planer later)?
    I think that once you experience the fact that changing between functions is fast and easy, you'll not tire of it. And it also promotes better planning and workflow...since I moved to a J/P, I tend to get all my flattening out of the way up-front so most of the time, my machine is actually sitting there in thicknessing mode. The 60 seconds or so to switch it back isn't a hassle if I, um...forgot...something.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
    If you don't mind waiting 40+ weeks, why not try and shop the used market a bit before spending that large of an amount on a single machine. Check out eBay and auctions. I bought a fully restored 16" Moak Jointer from eBay for about $1900. Beds were enormous, flat within 0.003" and the entire machine was extremely solid. Oh and the best part, it was single phase, 3hp. I then put a Byrd spiral head on it for another $1800. I'd take that machine over anything Felder, Martin or SCMI makes any day. I also picked up a newer 12" Grizzly spiral head jointer for $1500 last year.

    My point being, be a little smart and patient with your money and you can make it go much, much farther. Especially on a jointer, as a jointer only does one thing and it's a very simple thing

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    442
    I love my A3-41. I would not go <16" for the J/P with your budget.

    Used bandsaws seem much more plentiful to me, even older 20"+ versions. I'd get a K3 slider with the rest of the budget.

    The main issue is you are going to wait 6-8 months at this point.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Mitchell View Post
    As a hobbyist, the OP certainly lists a lot of industrial machines. If that's what the OP wants, hey, go for it, but if there are budgetary constraints, there are great machines which will serve the hobbyist well for many years that cost far less.

    I think the A3-41 is an embarrassment of luxury for a hobbyist. And OP can use his current lunchbox planer in some of those scenarios when changing the A3 between jointer and planer would mean that settings are lost. And then to have money for a great bandsaw? Heck yes, I'd rather have a great bandsaw and the A3 than the 741, because I'm not running a professional mill, where I'm surfacing lumber 8 hours a day. IDK about paying for a Felder bandsaw, I think I'd rather spend the money elsewhere. Again, you can get a great Hammer bandsaw (or Powermatic, or Laguna, or etc) bandsaw because you're not going to run that bandsaw 8 hours a day just to make payroll.
    I am a hobbyist. I have the A3-41 (purchased new), and I'm not embarrassed! It is a very practical solution for me, in terms of capacity, cost (compared to separate, equivalent capacity machines) and floor space, including the material-handling footprint. The carbide insert cutterhead, numerical thickness indicator insert for the handweel, and short extension table on the outfeed of the planer (and the separate mounting bar for it) are highly recommended.

    I would not say it is a great solution for everyone, just as I would certainly not rule it out for a hobbyist.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I think that once you experience the fact that changing between functions is fast and easy, you'll not tire of it. And it also promotes better planning and workflow...since I moved to a J/P, I tend to get all my flattening out of the way up-front so most of the time, my machine is actually sitting there in thicknessing mode. The 60 seconds or so to switch it back isn't a hassle if I, um...forgot...something.
    I would far prefer separates. A combo machine would drive me nuts. My approach originated from hand planing, which involves (at least initially) flipping the board over repeatedly to plane the high spots on both sides, allowing the board to “relax” into a flattened state with less loss of thickness, and/or removing similar thickness from both sides. Jointing one side completely and then planing the other can lead to some awkward results.

    So I have the jointer and planer (both Powermatics) side by side. I would hate to not have this option. With a 30x80 space, the OP has the room.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    889
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Mitchell View Post
    As a hobbyist, the OP certainly lists a lot of industrial machines. If that's what the OP wants, hey, go for it, but if there are budgetary constraints, there are great machines which will serve the hobbyist well for many years that cost far less.

    I think the A3-41 is an embarrassment of luxury for a hobbyist. And OP can use his current lunchbox planer in some of those scenarios when changing the A3 between jointer and planer would mean that settings are lost. And then to have money for a great bandsaw? Heck yes, I'd rather have a great bandsaw and the A3 than the 741, because I'm not running a professional mill, where I'm surfacing lumber 8 hours a day. IDK about paying for a Felder bandsaw, I think I'd rather spend the money elsewhere. Again, you can get a great Hammer bandsaw (or Powermatic, or Laguna, or etc) bandsaw because you're not going to run that bandsaw 8 hours a day just to make payroll.
    I wouldn't be embarrassed if I had a hobby shop full of Martin's..

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    Totally agree - so many beautiful old machines out there. Could get a 16”-24” jointer and a 20”+ planer for a $1k-$2k each.
    Prices for turn key machines are typically higher than that, but even so that would be my suggestion.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,683
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Mitchell View Post
    As a hobbyist, the OP certainly lists a lot of industrial machines. If that's what the OP wants, hey, go for it, but if there are budgetary constraints, there are great machines which will serve the hobbyist well for many years that cost far less.ther spend the money elsewhere. Again, you can get a great Hammer bandsaw (or Powermatic, or Laguna, or etc) bandsaw because you're not going to run that bandsaw 8 hours a day just to make payroll.
    WHy does being a "hobbyist" matter when it comes to personal machine choice? "Hobbyist" encompasess a huge range of folks from individuals who feel they have simple needs all the way to woodworkers who do amazing work in shops that rival many commercial operations. There is no universal "good enough". I"m not sure where the term "embarrassment of luxury for a hobbyist" comes from, but honestly that' just doesn't apply in any way, shape or form to anyone's personal decision about what is best for their own needs and desires.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #27
    Hey Jake, If I had your cash and space, I'd buy a separate 16" helical jointer and a 20" helical planer. You'd be about 10 grand for both.

    Are the combo machines good, yes? But you're limited to16" of width and that can be a bummer on larger slabs. Also another thing is ergonomics.

    Not having the top return rollers and a place to set your wood on a combo machine is tedious if you're going to run a lot of pieces, and the changeover as well.

    Oliver makes a 16" helical machine for 6k, 5hp 1 phase. Grizzly has similar machines for 6k ish. Hamer makes the standalone 16" jointer for 5k ish

    Plenty of options to get a nice 20" 5hp helical planer for 4k and under.

  13. #28
    I have the A3-31 and love it, but fear that we may be steering him towards this choice. Go in with eyes wide open on a jointer planer. You get:

    Higher jointer capacity at the expense of lower planer capacity.
    A helical cutter head where you might not have spent extra to do it for separate machines.
    More space efficiency at the expense of changing over. The 2 hassles in changeover are moving the dust chute and having to crank the table down or up 150mm.
    You will learn how to gang your jointing and planing ops so you're not constantly having to do it. Eventually, you won't notice this as a nuisance.

    If you routinely do larger things that benefit from extension tables, then these can complicate switch over.

    It's good that you've been at this for a while, because only YOU know how you best work. For my money, I couldn't be unabashedly happier with my 31. Seams can be flattened with a hand plane. Remember too that 16" planing and jointing capacity means you have to be able to LIFT and support that kind of work.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,896
    I think the Austrian made hammer machine is a good investment. If woodworking didn’t workout for you it will a excellent resale value.
    Im not a fan of the insert head for a jointer because it’s a handfed machine. I like knives
    I did notice the euro style insert heads have less cutters so that should help with feeding wood without a lot of pressure.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  15. #30
    IMHO, the Hammer would be great as a 16" jointer only, but you'd benefit from having both. Try purchasing a 16" jointer for under $6k.

    I've also been woodworking for 20 years. Lots of tools have come and gone. I had a Jet 12" J/P and sold it to a friend last summer. I would not get an A3-31, as it's 12". I will be getting the A3-41 in May. Ordered and paid for the deposit in June of last year, but the factory is running slow. There will be a price increase in the very near future.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •