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Thread: Anyone laminated lead sheet to plywood? What adhesive?

  1. #1
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    Anyone laminated lead sheet to plywood? What adhesive?

    I am looking at possibly laminating lead sheet to plywood for a project. What adhesives work for this? The big issue is the temperature of the plywood can get to 250F for short periods. Neither contact cement nor epoxy can handle those temperatures. I do not have a way to spray any adhesives.

  2. #2
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    I'm guessing you will also have trouble with the plywood. I don't think you can get the ignition point that low, but can't be good for the glue with lots of cycles. The thin plywood on the roof of my 50s ranch sure didn't do well from a poorly ventilated attic.

  3. #3
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    There are plenty of high temperature epoxies available, rated to 500 or 600F. Whether they will bond lead to plywood is a question for the manufacturer, and even then, getting dissimilar materials to stay bonded over temperature cycles will likely be a challenge, given the likely differences in expansion coefficients. If it does stay bonded it may bow with temp changes. And as Richard points out, even the plywood is suspect at those temperatures.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

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    Seems like you might want a thin advanced insulation between them. Some alternate very thin layers of metal and paper to make a super insulation. The lead will hold heat which would make the 250 time longer. Do you have time to make some test pieces before doing the whole thing?

  5. #5
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    I am building an enclosure for a 12.5 KW diesel generator. The radiator will be mounted outside of the enclosure to reduce heat in the enclosure.

    There will be a good size squirrel cage blower running while the generator is operating so the temperature should probably be under 150 degrees while running. The issue is heat soak once the generator turns off which also turns off the blower. I don't have a real good way to keep the blower running after shutdown unless I add a temperature switch to the blower.

  6. #6
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    Why the lead?

  7. #7
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    So you’re using the lead to reflect sounds. You might look into “mass loaded vinyl”. It is flexible vinyl sheet loaded with lots of something heavy, developed specifically for sound deadening.

    You also might consider using backer board to line your enclosure. This is cement board used as a substrate for tiling. Home Depot and the like sell it. I’m pretty sure it will withstand your temperature regime.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    I am building an enclosure for a 12.5 KW diesel generator. The radiator will be mounted outside of the enclosure to reduce heat in the enclosure.

    There will be a good size squirrel cage blower running while the generator is operating so the temperature should probably be under 150 degrees while running. The issue is heat soak once the generator turns off which also turns off the blower. I don't have a real good way to keep the blower running after shutdown unless I add a temperature switch to the blower.
    There are lots of ways to reduce noise transmission that don't involve lead. They make a sound deadening foam that is made for that specific purpose that is self adhesive on one side. As far as your blower goes, put it on a separate circuit with a heat sensor to turn it on and off.
    Lee Schierer
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    ... put it on a separate circuit with a heat sensor to turn it on and off.
    Or perhaps just a off-delay timing relay: https://www.mcmaster.com/off-delay-relays/ (lots of sources - search "off-delay relay"). Blower runs while the generator runs, then continues after generator cut-off for however long the timer is set for.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    Or perhaps just a off-delay timing relay: https://www.mcmaster.com/off-delay-relays/ (lots of sources - search "off-delay relay"). Blower runs while the generator runs, then continues after generator cut-off for however long the timer is set for.
    The problem is how does the timer know when the generator has stopped putting out power?

  11. #11
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    There are lots of ways to block sound. It has been recommended to me to laminate lead sheet between two pieces of plywood to block the low frequency noise from the generator. It is probably the density and weight of the lead that helps block the low frequency sound.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    Or perhaps just a off-delay timing relay: https://www.mcmaster.com/off-delay-relays/ (lots of sources - search "off-delay relay"). Blower runs while the generator runs, then continues after generator cut-off for however long the timer is set for.
    off delay timers look for a signal to start the timer, it will run for say, 10 min after the signal is received, such as hooking it to the +12 for the fuel pump, starting relay, ignition coil or similar.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    There are lots of ways to block sound. It has been recommended to me to laminate lead sheet between two pieces of plywood to block the low frequency noise from the generator. It is probably the density and weight of the lead that helps block the low frequency sound.
    lots of layers of different densities is the way to go, though i am not sure lead and ply are necessary. layers of foam and drywall or cement board may be easier to construct, and use green glue between, i bet this will be cheaper, more effective and easier to build. most of the noise will come from your vents, like those with some kind of egg crate foam or similar, depending on how far you want to go.

  14. #14
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    Would that insulation that they put under car hoods work? Something like "Design Engineering 050130 Boom Mat under hood acoustic lining" might be better. This stuff is self stick and good to 275 degrees.

  15. #15
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    Nobody uses lead for sound attenuation anymore. A couple of layers of 5/8 drywall with Greenglue between works great. Before building something like this it's best to just dive down the rabbit hole & learn more about it. There are so many myths & misconceptions and some things that seem intuitively would work will actually make things worse.

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