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Thread: Finally we got permit for construction

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    New Brunswick, Canada
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    221
    Quote Originally Posted by Anuj Prateek View Post
    I was planning based on similar thoughts. I want to buy a 3HP TS so planned 20A 240v. Makes sense to start with 10ga wire. Electrician is coming next week, will get this done with 10ga wire.

    Thanks for sharing. Wouldn't have thought about going with 10ga.
    No problem. It was annoying to have to replace wiring because I hadn’t planned ahead. The J/P is a great machine for my space and is worth the trouble.
    I claimed the garage as a work space when we bought the house. The trade-off is my wife rarely has to scrape her windshield or get into a frosty car...

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    56,948
    Missing the "future accommodation for 30a tools" isn't unusual and isn't surprising. Our buying patterns have changed over the years to the point that the sometimes "conventional" thought that our woodworking tools will only need 20a 240v has become challenged. 5hp table saws are more common. J/P combo buys have increased noticeably compared to just a few years ago. Etc. So I will echo the advise to at least pre-wire any 240v circuits in a shop so they can support 30a should it be needed. And honestly, in my future shop, I'm just going to run 30 amp 240v circuits "out to the floor" universally to cover all bases.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
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    4,576
    One of the nice things about Minnesota is building permits cannot linger with the city. By state law a building permit has to be approved or denied within 60 days. If there is no action within 60 days the building permit is automatically approved.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Coquitlam
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    254
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Missing the "future accommodation for 30a tools" isn't unusual and isn't surprising. Our buying patterns have changed over the years to the point that the sometimes "conventional" thought that our woodworking tools will only need 20a 240v has become challenged. 5hp table saws are more common. J/P combo buys have increased noticeably compared to just a few years ago. Etc. So I will echo the advise to at least pre-wire any 240v circuits in a shop so they can support 30a should it be needed. And honestly, in my future shop, I'm just going to run 30 amp 240v circuits "out to the floor" universally to cover all bases.
    Make sense. And, no point paying again after few years.
    Told the contractor to get it done with 30 amp.


    On other end:
    City said, don't put pipes (drain, conduit etc) that are not in plan. So going to skip that. Playing it safe.
    Yesterday, they finished all excavation work. Some manual digging happening today for drain tiles, footing etc.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,771
    One day that garage may house an electric car. That can take a lot of amps.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Coquitlam
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    254
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    One of the nice things about Minnesota is building permits cannot linger with the city. By state law a building permit has to be approved or denied within 60 days. If there is no action within 60 days the building permit is automatically approved.

    I can see how that would help accelerating the process as a consumer.

    Though I much prefer that things get reviewed and city is accountable for providing right ETA and step details.
    Don't know how it can be implemented/enforced though.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Coquitlam
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    254
    We met electrician today. Mentioned all the suggestion from here and future proofing needs.

    Line is getting upgraded to 200 amp. Original 100 amp panel will stay as is and become sub panel. Another 100 amp sub panel will go to shop. Shop panel will be used to provide circuits for house extension as well.

    I did not understand the in wall wiring fully, but this is what I got. He will run wires to support 30/240 amp everywhere in shop. But wherever 20/240 amp socket is required, he will use a junction to use right wire gauge. On 110 circuit, he will wire everything for 20A sockets. He will add one 50/240 wherever we pick.

    Cost wise things did not change much.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
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    4,809
    As mentioned above, you may need that 50A in the garage for your car in a few years.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    56,948
    Quote Originally Posted by Anuj Prateek View Post
    We met electrician today. Mentioned all the suggestion from here and future proofing needs.

    Line is getting upgraded to 200 amp. Original 100 amp panel will stay as is and become sub panel. Another 100 amp sub panel will go to shop. Shop panel will be used to provide circuits for house extension as well.

    I did not understand the in wall wiring fully, but this is what I got. He will run wires to support 30/240 amp everywhere in shop. But wherever 20/240 amp socket is required, he will use a junction to use right wire gauge. On 110 circuit, he will wire everything for 20A sockets. He will add one 50/240 wherever we pick.

    Cost wise things did not change much.
    Why not just use 30 amp breakers and terminations from the get-go as standard? The cost difference is minimal and there's nothing to change later. And doing the junction box thing you describe may make moving to a 30 amp situation in the future more complicated. I'm standardizing on 30 amp for all 240v accommodations in my future shop for all those reasons.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Coquitlam
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    254
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Why not just use 30 amp breakers and terminations from the get-go as standard? The cost difference is minimal and there's nothing to change later. And doing the junction box thing you describe may make moving to a 30 amp situation in the future more complicated. I'm standardizing on 30 amp for all 240v accommodations in my future shop for all those reasons.
    Is it ok to run 3HP 20A/240V table saw on 30A socket? I thinking of buying a Sawstop and picked the number from specs.

    As I typed it realized the dumbness. Will ask to simply wire everything for 30A. That makes things even more simple. Thanks Jim!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    221
    I ran 30 amp receptacles everywhere and put the appropriate plugs on my machines. I had to make a cord for my Sawstop and J/P anyway. Much less complicated.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anuj Prateek View Post
    Is it ok to run 3HP 20A/240V table saw on 30A socket? I thinking of buying a Sawstop and picked the number from specs.!
    Yes. The breaker protects the wire, not the tool. As long as the tool doesn't require MORE amperage than your circuit, you're fine. You can run a 1 amp load on a 30 amp circuit if you want. But you can't run a 40 amp load on a 30 amp circuit.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New Westminster BC
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    1,729
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    One day that garage may house an electric car. That can take a lot of amps.
    Excellent point, roughing in the service for a 220 volt car charger is probably a good idea any time your upgrading your wiring.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    1,521
    Most of my 240v outlets are 30 amps but I do have one 40 amp and a couple 20 amp outlets. For the 40 amp outlet I have a couple of 6" adapters that has a 40 amp plug and a 30 amp and 20 amp receptacles so I can plug 30 amp machine or two 20 amp machines into it. 40 might have been overkill but I wanted it for my 20" planer. I did the same with a 30 amp to plug a 20 amp into it. I didn't want to cut the factory plugs off of the 20 amp tools. The circuit breaker size and outlet are designed to protect the wiring, not the tool or it's cord. You can never have too many outlets. Also you can never have too many 120v circuits.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Coquitlam
    Posts
    254
    This Thursday, concrete was poured for footing. The machine that came to pump concrete was more fun to look at than the actual pour.

    PXL_20210415_152909566.jpg

    PXL_20210415_152904432.jpg

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