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Thread: Hauling My Planer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oskaloosa Iowa
    Posts
    178

    Hauling My Planer

    I found a planer and need to haul it home. It's 2 1/2 hrs away . I have a pickup and the seller has a skid steer to lift it. My brother in-law has a tractor to unload it once I get home but...I will need to get it down my basement also.
    I have a couple questions about hauling it.

    Should I put the table all the way down ? I have read to put some hard foam under the table while hauling.
    Is it ok to use the lifting rods to put straps on while strapping it Down ?

    Once I get home I was thinking about taking the unit off the base for ease of getting down the basement. Would that be ok ?
    Or maybe I should take it apart while I haul it.

    Any advice/tips from the experts ?

    Thanks

    jet planer.jpg
    Last edited by Mike Burke; 03-24-2021 at 12:21 PM.

  2. #2
    Nice planer! I have the Grizzly version of that one (G0453). The loose metal rods coming out of the base are lifting rods for skids/ropes etc, they don't have any other function. I wouldn't lift or secure by the table extensions; in fact I would remove the extensions before transit.

    I think when I got mine from Grizzly, the table just had the locks tightened on it, but that was at least a dozen years ago, so I'm not certain anymore. I'd be most concerned with tipping while in the truck. While the motor is mounted low, I seem to remember that the unit is still a little top heavy.

    If possible, don't take the planer part apart, besides things like the handle, extensions, dust port, and switch. That said, the overall weight on the unit is somewhere around 650# and most of that is in the planer. It might be worth getting movers or a piano mover to take it down the stairs; the planer is kind of fragile, and unlikely to survive a fall.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    1,472
    First, be careful on how you lift it. Those rods below the in/out feed rollers are for lifting. Pallet forks would work but it's top heavy. These planers are sent from the factory screwed down inside a box onto pallets without any foam so I see no need to do so. If anything your pickup will ride smoother than the semi trailer it was delivered in. There's nothing on the end of the rods to keep a strap or chain from sliding off. They are fine for lifting straight up but for tying it down you will need to take in account how you place the straps to secure it in your truck. You can just as easily wrap a strap around each post. Just be careful of the strap damaging the paint (If that matters to you).

    A tractor would work but I would wash the bucket first. Then I would place the bucket above the planer curled down and put straps over the bucked. That way it's less likely to tip over. Do it on flat ground to avoid having too much weight up high (tractors are tippy). Once lifted I would drive the truck out from under it and then lower it close to the ground.

    As for the stairs, sorry I can't help much. You can remove some parts, like the in/out feed rollers and motor to help lighten it up. Probably could unbolt it from the base but I suspect that it'll still be heavier that two people can lift so getting it back on it in the basement could be an issue.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    6,203
    I used to have itís granddad, the 15HO. Moved it a few times, up and down stairs to and from basements. The working end removes from the base with 4 screws, and removing the belt. The working end is heavy, but two strong guys or a hand truck with two guys will get it into the basement. Itíll be a lot safer to transport taken apart, with the CoG lower.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oskaloosa Iowa
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    178
    I wouldn't lift or secure by the table extensions; in fact I would remove the extensions before transit.
    I will definitely take those off and not use them to lift or strap down.

    The working end removes from the base with 4 screws, and removing the belt.
    Thanks, That's what I was thinking about doing. And then maybe get an appliance moving cart under it and getting it down the stairs , with a couple strong guys.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    1,472
    If you have a friend with an engine lift buy him a 6 pack and borrow it for the day. I have one and it works great for doing stuff like this.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,820
    another method I have heard of is to run a 4x4 through on either side of the table. Leave a foot or more sticking out on the infeed and outfeed side. Strap and lift from those 4x4's and it will not flip over. If lifted by those lifting rods the COG is above the lifting point and it need to be tied so it will not flip.
    If I did the beam lift method I would raise the cutter head and place the beams where desired then lower the cutter head, turned so no blade is touching wood just bear down with the cylinder radius.
    Bill D

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    6,203
    I prefer a hand truck with bigger pneumatic tires, rather than an appliance dolly. Bigger tires make it easier to bump down stairs. HF has them for about $40.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Morocco IN
    Posts
    1,249
    Nice planer Mike - you're gonna like it. Getting it down to the basement is gonna be fun. If you're basement stairs are open stringer with no mid run support, you might want to add some bracing to them. I would be happy to help but I don't live any where near you. Honest I would.
    You know, the worst ain't so bad when it finally happens.
    Not half as bad as you figure it'll be before it's happened.
    - Bob Curtin

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oskaloosa Iowa
    Posts
    178
    An update on my planer moving.

    Friday after work went to get it. Looked it all over and in good shape. It ran fine and adjustments are prett smooth. No oil or grease anywhere. The seller hadnít used it much after buying it new from Pucket Tools now Acme Tools. It had been taken care of. 👍

    I did not take the top off. Even though a little top heavy I didnít think there was a need. It was pretty solid on its base. Loaded it up and put a big plastic bag over it, chances of rain here, and put two large ratchet straps x across the pull out handles and it was good to go. 2 1/2 he drive home with no issues

    This morning I did take the top off , belts , switch , belt cover and 4 bolts in the corner. 5 minute job. My help came at 8 and two of us grabbed the top with the handles and carried it down the 6 concrete steps easily. And two carried the base. 5 minute job. 👍

    I am going to clean it up , itís going to take a lot of TLC , while putting it back together. Overall it was pretty painless process.
    planer truck.jpgplaner1.jpgplaner bed.jpg
    Last edited by Mike Burke; 03-27-2021 at 1:32 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    805
    Mike - Glad to know you got in home and inplace safe and sound. I've found that I frequently "think" getting something into my shop is going to be difficult, and it turns out to be not all that difficult. Perhaps overestimating is the key.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Morocco IN
    Posts
    1,249
    Good goin Mike - bet you can't wait to run some material thru it.
    You know, the worst ain't so bad when it finally happens.
    Not half as bad as you figure it'll be before it's happened.
    - Bob Curtin

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oskaloosa Iowa
    Posts
    178
    Yep...I'm ready to do some milling. Guess I'll have to start a new project. Bill, your signature is right on

  14. #14
    Hi Mike,
    While you are in a fix-it-up mood, it probably would be a good idea to change the oil in the gear box. My identical looking Grizzly from about the same time came with a break-in lubricant that the manual said should be changed out after something like 24 hours of machine use. If the original owner didn't use it much, it is likely it was never changed out. Even if it was, it would be good to swap it out in case there was some condensation in the oil over time.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oskaloosa Iowa
    Posts
    178
    Good suggestion Andrew

    I will do some searching for maintenance on this planer. I got the manual also and I am sure there is some information in there. I was even going to get some new belts if the auto store or hardware store had them. I am pretty OCD about having clean equipment.

    It'll be pretty clean when I'm done on the outside....and I will do the required internal maintenance also. A lot of TLC , but I like to do that. Thanks

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