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Thread: Forrest Woodworker blades - worth the money?

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    56,671
    Quote Originally Posted by Rona Dancer View Post
    Wait... a 12” rip blade? How are you doing that? Can I actually it on my TS????

    The post below yours indicates the same. I’m a newbie here, so be kind please!  .
    My saw, an SCM/Minimas S315WS slider, is designed to use a 12" blade. You cannot use a 12" blade on a saw designed for a 10" blade if that's what you have. I chose to continue to use the 10" version of the ripping blade (20T) because I so rarely need something that aggressive for the kind of work I do. The 10" blade on my saw has a slower tip speed than a 12" balde does, but it works just fine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    I walked into a shop last week while they were running the table saw and it sounded like someone dragging a tin can full of coins down the highway. Yeah, no wonder you have chip-out problem.

    Erik
    I experience the same thing. Amazing how many people running various machines don't know what anything is called nor do they care for the equipment/tooling properly. I think they were just taught the function they need to perform.

    As for blades, sell many types so will not comment but do believe Forrest will price themselves out of business eventually.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    I use Tenryu, Stehle and Amana, all pretty decent but the Tenryu miter pro plus are really nice for cross cutting.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    springfield,or
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    625
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Gumpper View Post
    I experience the same thing. Amazing how many people running various machines don't know what anything is called nor do they care for the equipment/tooling properly. I think they were just taught the function they need to perform.

    As for blades, sell many types so will not comment but do believe Forrest will price themselves out of business eventually.
    This is so true and my employee do it. Went to use a saw in our shop today and it just wasn't cutting. Taking wayyy to long.

    I joking said something like "how the hell are you guys still using this thing" to which I got a response of "why?, It's still cuts"

    I just had to shake my head and walk away for a few.

  5. #65
    Try POPULAR (brand) saws ,low cost high quality.

  6. #66
    I am a fan of the Freud glue line ripping blades. I rip and cross cut with a ripping blade. Finish quality of the cut is the least of the problems (for me) on a table saw or bandsaw. I am way more concerned with square and straight. That's why I only use ripping blades for everything now on the table saw. Even on cross cuts, the show face comes out perfectly. I cross cut with a sled or fenced miter gauge so tear out on the trailing edge can be controlled.

    For my money, it's just easier to get a new Freud than to have to worry about sharpening a precious blade. That would also require down time which would annoy me.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
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    689
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    Try POPULAR (brand) saws ,low cost high quality.
    I've got a couple (a 10" cross-cut and a 7 1/4" x 40 or so that i use in my 10" table saw for segmenting). Small sampling, but both excellent blades.
    earl

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
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    2,110
    I was on Amazon ordering a Wixey and noticed they had Freud blades on sale. I needed a version for flat bottom kerfs so I ordered their 24T HD Rip Blade. The price was right and anything I've ever bought from Freud has been exceptional. We'll see how it works.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
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    6,524
    Quote Originally Posted by Carroll Courtney View Post
    Don't the Forrest blades have the better carbide teeth, thinking C4 or something like that? Due to C4 carbide not all sharpening shops can sharpen Forrest blades. Which is why sending them back to Forrest to get them sharpen when needed if you ever need to. Thinking out loud here, not knowing 100% sure of my statement
    I kinda remember that Forrest WWII (and the high end Freud) have a side grind on the teeth that not every sharpener can duplicate. That side grind is responsible for the polished cut.

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Jones 5443 View Post
    These table saw blade threads always make me feel like Im missing out on something fabulous.

    I use Diablo blades, which as far as I can tell are a budget line made by Freud. Theyre cheap at Home Depot. I have a 24-tooth rip and an 80-tooth crosscut. Ive had them sharpened and I keep them clean. They cut everything well.

    Noise comparison? The saw doesnt go on unless Im wearing major ear protection, so sorry, what?

    Am I nave, or is it acceptable to use these pedestrian blades? Tell me now, because Im on my 20th year with them. Or do I need to spend four times as much?
    Noise? It's how I tell the condition of a blade. If you heard a thumping from your car's rear wheel you would know it wasn't in optimal condition. If you bought four new tires and the buzzed like chain saws, you'd recognize that as resistance. Likewise, any energy from a saw going into soundwaves is energy being lost for pne reason or another. Particular sounds can indicate particular causes. A flutter from a drive belt is not caused by the same issue as a squeal. A quiet cutting blade indicates clean slicing and little vibration.

  11. #71
    The triple chip saws are the loudest Ive heard , but they do work well for laminate. Ive seen them used for wood ,and they are loud
    for that too.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Woodstock, VA
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    894
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    Try POPULAR (brand) saws ,low cost high quality.
    I have a 16 36 tooth rip blade from Popular Tools and Ill second the endorsement. Interestingly enough the other blade on that saw is a WW2, same kerf width (3/16), saw is an Oliver 260D so no blade changes just spin the handle till the other blade comes up.

    The Popular Tools blade is definitely better at the rip cuts and the WW2 is definitely better at the cross cuts.
    On another saw I have both thin kerf and 1/8 kerf rip blades from Freud and Amana. The Amana is the 20T Euro rip blade, its the fastest but the glue line from Freud leaves a better finish.

    All the rip blades see as much use in ripping as they do in cutting joinery: for a lot of joinery cuts I prefer a flat top grind. For joinery cuts on the small saw I would be more likely to use the Freud. For joinery cuts on the big saw it almost doesnt matter, its so smooth it just leaves a perfect surface regardless which blade is in use.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Woodstock, VA
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    894
    One other note: I wish we could go back to calling blades saws, its more fun to say. Youll get instant respect from the old sharpening shops if you call them saws!

  14. #74
    Never had an issue running a 12 inch blade on either of the General cabinet saws. I ground the castings to fit back in early 80's and used them with 12" blades many times. Blade wont retract flush to the table top, had work that had to get done and it worked well.

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