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Thread: Table Saw Digital Readout Options

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Tampa Bay, FL
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    2,555
    Well, it turns out not too easy yet. My microadjuster gets caught up in the supports for the Accurate Technology Digifence supports. So I had to take a hacksaw to my microadjuster to make it less tall.

    I also had to install the hinge adapter to the fence.

    So, to make this work, I had to go through 6 drill bits, fiberglass the parts to the rail twice, remove my auxillary fence, and hacksaw and grind down my microadjuster to make the Accurate Technologies Digifence work.

    The Wixey was so much easier. Keep this in mind if you have an ICS, or perhaps any Sawstop.

    Here's the microadjuster finally installed and working (I hope.)

    Accurate Technologies Digifence 4.jpg
    Accurate Technologies Digifence 5.jpg
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  2. #17
    I'm tempted to adapt a metal working DRO. Had one on my 12x36 metal lathe with a huge display that's easy to read from several feet away. When the ICS arrives I'll be giving it the raised eyebrow on this.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
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    239
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    1
    I have the DigiFence on my Unisaw which is a very similar mounting. I see you have a micro adjuster and I understand that you already have it and want to make use of it. However, I can set my fence within a thousandth or two by bumping the which would seem to be much quicker than the adjustor.

    I don't have your setup and I'm not knocking it but it may have been easier to just remove the micro adjuster.

    Also, what is the rotary adjustor on you auxiliary fence?

    You indicated you had to remove your auxiliary fence but I don't understand why?...

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
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    2,555
    That "rotary adjuster" is a Deulen Safety Fence. It was a 2015 WOOD Innov8Award winner, and I bought one at the time. It is incredibly handy/safer for ripping narrow pieces on the table saw. That being said, sadly I was one of a tiny number of people who bought them, and the inventor had to stop making them.

    Interestingly, I e-mailed him recently out of the blue, and he is working on an upgraded version that sounds motorized with a stepper motor and improved. Could be awesome. I very much like his original one. It does make a dodgy operation quite safe, and allows me to use my overhead dust guard more often on narrow pieces. I would seriously consider it when that comes out.

    I have no financial relationship with the company. Just one of the few who bought one way back.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    That "rotary adjuster" is a Deulen Safety Fence. It was a 2015 WOOD Innov8Award winner, and I bought one at the time. It is incredibly handy/safer for ripping narrow pieces on the table saw. That being said, sadly I was one of a tiny number of people who bought them, and the inventor had to stop making them.

    Interestingly, I e-mailed him recently out of the blue, and he is working on an upgraded version that sounds motorized with a stepper motor and improved. Could be awesome. I very much like his original one. It does make a dodgy operation quite safe, and allows me to use my overhead dust guard more often on narrow pieces. I would seriously consider it when that comes out.

    I have no financial relationship with the company. Just one of the few who bought one way back.
    Watched a video and like the idea. His hold downs need work as they allowed that short piece to lift up but that's so much safer. That said I wonder if most people just cut those on a bandsaw. Even with the safety fence I'd be not inclined to use a table saw for this.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    89
    I also have a 36" PCS. So far I haven't seen the need for a digital readout. I find the factory scale works fine for me.

    I have the Wixey on my drill press, it has turned out less useful than I thought. The main issue is that the resolution is too good. For example, if I was trying to drill a 1/2" hole, it's too easy to go from 7/16", to 15/32", to 1/2" to 17/32", etc. Analog scales in my view make it easier to see the 1/2".

    Also, on my PCS, I am usually more interested in repeatability than a super exact measurement. It is woodworking after all.

    The Woodpecker Rip-Flip Fence Stop does look interesting. Doesn't require drilling any holes in the saw :-). I am waiting till they ship it and see what the actual user feedback is.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,680
    I installed the Wixey DRO on my Unisaw and 52" Unifence shortly after Wixey began offering them. I used short pieces of 1/2" square tubing cantilevered out from under the Unifence rail and attached the Wixey readout extrusion upside down to these 1/2" square pipe pieces. Then installed the readout PC board strips right side up. I wanted the extrusions to run the full length of the Unifence, so I could use the fence and readout on both sides of the saw blade, so I bought an additional extrusion and PC board strip from Wixey. Adding this additional extrusion also keeps the readout module from falling to the floor when you forget to disconnect it's magnetic coupling from the fence and move the fence past the blade location. The main Unifence fence casting is aluminum, so I used the Wixey supplied metal magnetic target strip by cutting it in half and mounting each half to the sides of the Unifence casting. This lets me use the Wixey readout module on either side of the Unifence since the module can magnetically attach to either side of the Unifence main casting.

    I have found that I can set the fence to 1" from the blade using the Wixey DRO and then make a cut in a piece of hard wood like Maple. Then move the fence to other positions and make cuts. Then move the fence back to the 1" position and make a duplicate cut to the first that I made. When checking the width of both of these 1" wide pieces using a Wixey digital caliper, the two pieces will be within 0.003" of each other. I don't need accuracy better than that in woodworking. I now have digital readouts on almost all of my woodshop power tools. Going fully digital and using laser line generators has taken me to a whole new level of woodworking accuracy and safety.

    Above my Unisaw I have a ceiling mounted laser line generator that puts a red cut line across the top of my table saw to show where the blade will cut as well as on any work that I'm cutting. This helps keep me from placing my hands anywhere near the cut line and it is especially good for doing any blind cuts that don't cut fully through the wood. DADO blade cuts come to mind here, but we frequently do blind cuts with just a saw blade too. What if the thickness of the wood changes or what if something goes wrong with the saw and the DADO blade or saw blade rises up during the cut, breaking through the top of the work? I certainly never want to be pushing the work and have this happen when my hand is above the DADO blade as this happens. This line is easy to turn on and off using a single button remote that I have Velcro attached to the top of my table saw fence. It can run on batteries, but a better way is to use the included "wall wort" power supply so it's always ready to use. If a red line is ever showing on my fingers, they are in the wrong place. I bought this laser and remote from Woodline USA www.woodline.com but these no longer seem to be available. They were originally marketed to help you stay on the cut line, but we use table saw fences for that, although the line projects well out in front and behind the saw table, so it does help stay on the line when ripping very long work. But I think they are a better safety feature than a blade guide and I use mine often. Maybe if enough of you ask about them, Woodline will begin carrying them again.

    Charley

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