Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 40

Thread: Benchtop CNC $2500-3000, What Companies Have the Best Phone Support, Etc?

  1. ..............





    .....
    ..
    Last edited by jeremy sanderson; 11-19-2021 at 10:41 PM.

  2. 20211108_111147.jpg

    I only paid $160 for this used mini cnc mill.

    Its not the greatest but as far as value its super.

    I retract my other posts...all cnc can be fun...from $200 chinese ones to $50k commercial

    I enjoy collecting older home hobby cncs...you can get some pretty good prices when u find a seller trying to dump a machjne not needed.

    The goofiest one i have is a 4ftx8ft mogul cnc.....yes its a pos but i only paid 300$ for it and included a 2hp router.

    Last edited by jeremy sanderson; 11-19-2021 at 11:10 PM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,073
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy sanderson View Post
    20211108_111147.jpg

    I only paid $160 for this used mini cnc mill.

    Its not the greatest but as far as value its super.

    I retract my other posts...all cnc can be fun...from $200 chinese ones to $50k commercial

    I enjoy collecting older home hobby cncs...you can get some pretty good prices when u find a seller trying to dump a machjne not needed.

    The goofiest one i have is a 4ftx8ft mogul cnc.....yes its a pos but i only paid 300$ for it and included a 2hp router.

    Jeremy - that was on heck of a deal on that mini cnc mill! I don't know where it is made - and that really doesn't matter. I looked them up and they have some nice machines. What software are you going to use to program it? I use an older version of MasterCAM for my cnc mill. The actual mill is well over 30 years old, but still running strong. Matsuura brand - Japan. No more customer service on my Matsuura, but I have learned how to work on it to keep it going. I have some machines that are old, although not 100 years. The oldest one I currently have is a Burke Millrite probably made in the 50's. It's not cnc, but I did add a digital readout back in the late 70's when I purchased it.
    David

  4. Maxnc mini mill was made in USA.

  5. I control the real old blue maxnc mini mill with mach3 and ive got some older manual machines ive got a real old Logan lathe prob from the 1940s..i like older stuff in general...when products were made to last and use less or no plastic components.....yes new products have more bells and whistles but are just cheap made and unreliable.... when the item fails after a couple years the old working 1950s machine trumps the bells and whistles features )

    A working old machine is better than a non working fancy new machine.

    To me reliability is the most important feature...not bells and whistles .
    Last edited by jeremy sanderson; 11-20-2021 at 7:52 AM.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,073
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy sanderson View Post
    I control the real old blue maxnc mini mill with mach3 and ive got some older manual machines ive got a real old Logan lathe prob from the 1940s..i like older stuff in general...when products were made to last and use less or no plastic components.....yes new products have more bells and whistles but are just cheap made and unreliable.... when the item fails after a couple years the old working 1950s machine trumps the bells and whistles features )

    A working old machine is better than a non working fancy new machine.


    To me reliability is the most important feature...not bells and whistles .
    I get it. You like old American iron. Some of the others feel the same way. There is always that question for some as to whether to buy an older vintage table saw (or jointer, etc.) and spend the time to rebuild it and get it going again, or buy something like a brand new Saw Stop, Grizzly, etc.
    David

  7. Thanks

    But i never mentioned anything about refurbishing or repairing old

    The key is typically there is no rebuilding involved...bottom line is older machines can last 50-75yrs...whereas something new may last 1-10yrs...this is a fact on most products ..power tools...tvs. small and large .appliances...electronics...hand tools...dehumidifiers...water heaters...furnaces...central ac..computer peripherals.....etc etc etc

    although bells and whistles csn make things a bit easier it does come with consequences such as premature failure...constant error codes..complicated/.difficult troubleshoiting repair. And higher operating costs..etc etc

    We live in a disposable society today which is good for corporstions and big government and bad for citizens.

    Anyways...its all fun...i just prefer products that were made with pride and designed and built to last.8
    Last edited by jeremy sanderson; 11-22-2021 at 5:15 AM.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,590
    If an older machine fits one's needs and they have the ability to self-support, I see no issue with that. There are starting to be some challenges, however, as Kev's threads in OT have illustrated relative to keeping older computer driven machines running. There are always trade-offs.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. yes i agree howevfer im not referring to commercial im referring to home hobby use..

    yippee......this is stuffing week...i LLLLLLLLLLLLLLove stuffing

    nobody ever makes enough stuffing when preparing thanksgiving dinner!!!!

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,590
    I'm also referring to home hobby use which is the majority of SMC members, although folks with business use are clearly the early adopters of CNC. The lower priced machines are what is getting more and more folks involved with CNC for hobby use and many struggle enough with the concept, let alone the CAD/CAM, leaving no energy for the support requirements of an older machine. No matter...there are good choices for everyone.

    And yea...stuffing/dressing. Da best.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,073
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy sanderson View Post
    Thanks

    But i never mentioned anything about refurbishing or repairing old

    The key is typically there is no rebuilding involved...bottom line is older machines can last 50-75yrs...whereas something new may last 1-10yrs...this is a fact on most products ..power tools...tvs. small and large .appliances...electronics...hand tools...dehumidifiers...water heaters...furnaces...central ac..computer peripherals.....etc etc etc

    although bells and whistles csn make things a bit easier it does come with consequences such as premature failure...constant error codes..complicated/.difficult troubleshoiting repair. And higher operating costs..etc etc

    We live in a disposable society today which is good for corporstions and big government and bad for citizens.

    Anyways...its all fun...i just prefer products that were made with pride and designed and built to last.8

    If you are fortunate enough to find old vintage American iron that does not and has never needed any repairs or service work, then good for you. Unfortunately that is most often not the case. This is true whether you are talking about machine tools, table saws, sewing machines, or whatever.
    David

  12. I disagree
    But thats not important anyways

    Whats important is
    3 days and its punkin pie and turkey n stuffin mmmmmm

  13. #28
    BAckorder was 5 months for me.

    You can't go wrong with OneFinity.

    And whether you like it or now, great customer service is absolutely essential. Something will go wrong, and you'll need their help to fix it. OneFinity is terrific here too.

  14. #29
    Looking for a 50-year old CNC might be difficult. Let us know how it goes.

    If you're looking for solid products...the OneFinity is bombproof. The stepper motors and spindle/router will eventually wear out, but the rest of it will last much longer than you or I will.

  15. although onefinity isnt too bad and has a couple features i like..thats about it and ..im not a fan of the machine and would not buy one personally

    there are way better machines for same price that are just overall better machines and much larger machinable area.

    larger stepper motors...superor spindle...and have structure / bed with good cable management

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •