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Thread: Help with Tool Identification?

  1. #16
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    I believe the small tool with the wing nut located between the Marsh Plane and the saw vise is a spoke adjusting tool for a bicycle or motorcycle.
    Lee Schierer
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    I believe the small tool with the wing nut located between the Marsh Plane and the saw vise is a spoke adjusting tool for a bicycle or motorcycle.
    The one that looks like a pliers is a ring crimping tool. Sometimes called a hog ring pliers. The wing nut is to adjust it for different amounts of compression. It is often used to crimp rings at the top of a chain link fence to attach it to a cable.

    The other item with a wing nut in that area looks to be a hand held vise often used by jewelers.

    None of my spoke wrenches from my bicycling days looked like that.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    I believe the small tool with the wing nut located between the Marsh Plane and the saw vise is a spoke adjusting tool for a bicycle or motorcycle.

    Thanks! I was wondering what that one was.

  4. #19
    The pliers at the bottom center are for "cyclone " or chain link fence (twisting the tie wire).

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    None of my spoke wrenches from my bicycling days looked like that.

    jtk
    No offense Jim, but you aren't old enough to have used one like that.

    Do a search for "antique spoke adjuster" and you will see many examples. My grandfather had one that he used.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    No offense Jim, but you aren't old enough to have used one like that.

    Do a search for "antique spoke adjuster" and you will see many examples. My grandfather had one that he used.
    Being before my time would explain it.

    How would you turn a spoke with one of those? You would have to be constantly removing it and resetting it.

    My wheel building and adjusting was always on bicycle wheels. Never on a motorcycle.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #22
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    AKA...Lineman's Pliers....

    Hand drill brace is missing the top pad....would have to turn a new one.

    CarpentersPincers....used to pull nails. Blacksmiths also used them.


    Tip on a new wedge...oversize it just a bit...and make new ones for both planes...as the one ones are usually worn down quite a bit from use. Also note how the end of the wedges are shaped, as the wedges helped start the shavings out the sides of the planes.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    AKA...Lineman's Pliers....

    Hand drill brace is missing the top pad....would have to turn a new one.

    CarpentersPincers....used to pull nails. Blacksmiths also used them.


    Tip on a new wedge...oversize it just a bit...and make new ones for both planes...as the one ones are usually worn down quite a bit from use. Also note how the end of the wedges are shaped, as the wedges helped start the shavings out the sides of the planes.
    That's fantastic info, thanks. In remaking the brace's pad, how do you remake the grooves that the metal screws onto?
    I literally just bought a lathe a month ago and have never used it. Sounds like a cool first project.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    How would you turn a spoke with one of those? You would have to be constantly removing it and resetting it.

    My wheel building and adjusting was always on bicycle wheels. Never on a motorcycle.

    jtk
    You align the spoke in the space between the jaws so the wrench is aligned with the spoke. Then you adjust the wing nut to tighten the jaws on the spoke nut. Once it is tight you twirl the wrench around the spoke to tighten or loosen the spoke. Some have a small hook at the end opposite the jaws that slips around the spoke to help hold it in place. This is only second one I've seen. My Dad had the one that belonged to my Grandfather, but I no longer know where it is.
    spoke.JPG
    Here is some information on the one shown above:
    Here is a very nice ANTIQUE PATENTED BICYCLE WRENCH-SPOKE TOOL MANUFACTURED BY THE A. DUDLEY MFG. COMPANY OF MENOMINEE, MICHIGAN . The patent date on this fine tool is MAY 29, 1894 . This small handy tool is in excellent condition, very clean and it adjusts easily. It also has a nice clean makers imprint. This small tool measures just 3-3/4 inches in length. It was carried by the cyclist of years ago and it was used to adjust the wheel spokes of tires when they became loose or out of round.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 03-02-2021 at 7:34 PM.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  10. #25
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    Did anyone identify the tool between the two T-bevels? If not can we get a better photo or two of it?
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    Did anyone identify the tool between the two T-bevels? If not can we get a better photo or two of it?
    That and the spoke wrench thing. For some reason it looks more like small vise jaws to me.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  12. #27
    Of the three bevels, two have no markings, and the third is a Stanley with a patent date of 9-06-04 (i.e. 1904). That's nice it's a Stanley. That wasn't visible until I cleaned them up today.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    AKA...Lineman's Pliers....

    Hand drill brace is missing the top pad....would have to turn a new one.

    CarpentersPincers....used to pull nails. Blacksmiths also used them.


    Tip on a new wedge...oversize it just a bit...and make new ones for both planes...as the one ones are usually worn down quite a bit from use. Also note how the end of the wedges are shaped, as the wedges helped start the shavings out the sides of the planes.
    Linesman's Pliers, or "nine's" as a Lineman would call them, have a square nose and a side cutter. Fence pliers have a short tapered nose and bypass cutters.

  14. #29
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    Just a warning John, you're on a knife edge. Fall one way into woodworking, the other way is into the morass of tool collecting.

  15. #30
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    John, the view that is needed is the view down the length of the plane, so the profile of the iron can be seen. It would help if that profile could be seen on both planes.

    Stew

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