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Thread: Ouch!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    9,576

    Ouch!

    Resaw on the tablesaw....leftover Ash scraps.....fingers were getting a might too close to that spinning blade.....Rather than stop, turn around, and grab the purpose made pushstick....I just grabbed a 1 x 1 x 6 piece of scrap Oak.....And, right and the end of the next cut..tip of the blade just nicked the end of the stick.....
    Resaw push stick.JPG
    And slammed the stick back into my hand....


    No stitches were needed...but...I closed up shop for the night....

    USE THE PUSHSTICK MADE FOR THE JOB!

    I have 2....normal wide, plastic one, and a narrow version...Just didn't take the time to turn around, and grab one....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Big Bend/Panhandle, FL
    Posts
    93
    Ouch is right. That could have been catastrophic.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    23,160
    Blog Entries
    1
    Heal quick Steven.

    My push sticks are always close at hand before the saw is turned on.

    Push Sticks - Planing Bird's Mouth - Circles & Claw.jpg

    There are three on the right between the winding sticks and the bird's mouth.

    Though my power saw is a bandsaw it can still present a bit of danger.

    Part of working safely is using the right tool for the job out of habit, not out of convenience.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Push sticks are like tape measures, rulers, and safety glasses. It is best to saturate the shop with them, so there are always a few handy and within reach. I think I have something like 10 push sticks of different sizes. Fortunately since they get made from scrap, they don't cost anything but time to make.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
    Posts
    646
    I make mine out of scrap also. I have a few commercial ones that cover larger pieces, but find the homemade ones get used more. The push stick that came with my saw doesn't get used on the table saw anymore after a violent kickback. I use it only on the bandsaw and router table now. It caused the front of the board to rise up on the blade and flip the piece at me. Fortunately, I saw standing on the side and it sailed past my head.
    Oh, and Andrew, pencils everywhere too!
    SWE

  6. #6
    I'm glad you're ok. Heal quickly.
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    921
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thankful to hear it was not worse!

    I recently had my teenagers (with appropriate instruction, safety protocols etc.) do a mini project for me to use up a bunch of scrap plywood... they traced and reproduced a bunch of my favorite style of push stick. They cut them on the band saw and used the stationary belt sander to smooth the edges a bit. Their results weren't perfectly polished, but the end result is a pile of perfectly useful push sticks (and I think they got good practice that day too)


    edit... +1 on the "pencils everywhere" comment
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3,185
    wow, that could have been much worse, glad it was not.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    9,576
    I think the stick took most of the damage...
    Ash Scrap Project. was a pushstick.JPG
    No, the red is not blood. It is paint from a Millers Falls rehab paint job...
    Ash Scrap Project, PROPER pushsticks.JPG
    That just happened to line up with the slot. Zero Clearance Overlay.....the other two objects ARE my two pushsticks.....Yellow one from Menard's the other is a home made for thin rips....

    Used the yellow one this afternoon...
    Ash Scrap Project, trim an edge.JPG
    trimming a few edges straight....
    Ash Scrap Project, lid stock.JPG
    From these to..
    Ash Scrap Project, lid panel.JPG
    This. May try a glue up this weekend?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    636
    Glad it wasn't worse Steven. Thanks for the safety reminder!

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Pitonyak View Post
    wow, that could have been much worse, glad it was not.
    Agree completely.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    9,576
    It IS healing..slowly..
    March work day, healing, still hurts.JPG
    Still hurts...

    Was trying to use a plane, today..
    March work day, shavings.JPG
    Jointing a few edges to do a glue-up...
    March work day, panel glued up.JPG
    Also needed to sharpen two items...a Millers Falls Type 2 No. 14...
    March work day, both need sharpened.JPG
    And that little 3/4" wide chisel....still not happy with how they turned out...


    May need Andrew's sharpening system....I do have the Unicorn available...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    9,576
    I suppose I should start another "Build Thread"? Something about a March Project?

    May just name it as The March Project Box?


    Clamp handles are still a bit "ouchy" when I tighten them down...
    March Project, back glued up.JPG
    At least I can use the tote on the plane better..
    March Project, thin a side.JPG
    We'll see....

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    springfield,or
    Posts
    613
    Glad your hand is feeling better.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,692
    This push block is made of Balsa, but foam works well too. It can not get slammed back into your hand. Ad it keeps ads several inches away.

    push block dipping.jpg

    Shown here accidentally dipping end grain into the top of the blade. Hardwood would have been dangerous.

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