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Thread: New tires for Chevy Equinox

  1. #16
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    Mar 2003
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    I've seen tires degrade from dry-rot, etc., but it was mostly on trailer tires. It's pretty much a "rule" that one replaces them on horse trailers every five years, regardless of how they physically look for safety reasons, for example. But I'm also sure there is some wiggle room, especially if a vehicle is garaged, etc. Mandating a 5 year limit would have some complications because as someone has mentioned, inventory isn't sold immediately after manufacture so a 5 year limit would really be shorter for many folks. I do understand the reasoning, however...there are folks out there running "very scary" tires for sure!

    That reminds me...I really need to replace the tires on my utility trailer. They are the originals and I've owned that thang since early 2006. LOL My bad...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael J Evans View Post
    I'm regards to the date codes, I would assume tires are much like the rubber hose business. The tires / hoses last much much longer than the mfgs intented date.
    I think the mfg date has more to do with how long it should sit on the shelf before effecting service life.
    This is one of many articles about tire life. You apparently have never owned an RV or boat trailer. I learned first hand about tire failure pulling my daughters boat to Florida. The boat and trailer was purchased new. RV magazines stress not running on tires 6 years or more in age on RV's. Tire failure is almost never just the loss of the tire. Damage to the trailer/or coach is almost always involved as well. The boat and trailer and tires were 6 years old. Not one but 2 blow outs in 900 miles. I'm a believer now in not running on old tires. There are many articles on the subject. Believe what you want though.

    https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...last-10-years/
    https://www.utires.com/articles/how-...t-if-not-used/

  3. #18
    had long trail TA for a while on a buick one mechanic recommended it hated them for 2 weeks then okay noisey as hell but firmed the car up. That was long ago different now im sure. I have a friend works on race cars and high end stuff, more work than he can handle cause of his quality. when he came here to park he always asked to park on my lawn under the big maple tree so his tires were not in the sun. People might laugh but when he had his heads done 20 plus years ago maybe 30 he sent them to Ed Pink. He won every slalomn race I ever saw his car in no matter who drove it. One a pro driver, one his friends wife in the ladies class.

  4. #19
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    Big Michelin fan here. I have put them on all my vehicles and on my 4 daughters. Never a problem. My 2015 Silverado 4x4 has them; OEM went 49k - don’t recall brand - and then i put Michelin LTX on and currently at 101k overall, so 52k on the Michelins and then look maybe 1/2 way worn.

    My dad used to say not to skimp on your teeth, shoes or tires. For me the added safety margin for the 2 - 3 years would be worth it. JMHO, YMMV. Patrick

  5. #20
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    I generally like Michelin, too...but not all of their tire models are "worthy", which is consistent with every other manufacturer, too. The Defender LTX is exceptional, IMHO, for Mid-size and larger SUVs.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
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    Sep 2009
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    Medina Ohio
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    Daughter had a Saturn Vue that came with Cooper tires they lasted a long time and she ended up getting another set.

  7. #22
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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The conundrum with buying "less expensive" tires is that they often have far shorter "real world" tread life, so you buy a second time much sooner. That could actually cost you more. For long life, I like Michelin Defender LTX, but am currently running the BFG Advantage T/A Sport because of OEM size availability. I had the Defenders on the Grand Cherokee I previously drove and have the T/A Sports on my Subaru Ascent. These are both similar sized vehicles to your Equinox.

    That said, if you only need two years, there are lots of choices. Do some shopping on Discount Tire Direct's website...or Tire Rack if you prefer. (I buy from Costco so it's Michelin, Bridgestone or BFG, but with lifetime rotation/balancing/road hazard)

    Jim

    At Discount Tire the BFG Advantage T/A Sport tire is about $40 cheaper per tire vs the Michelin I have now.
    Would you still go with the Michelin or you happy with the BFG?
    "Remember back in the day, when things were made by hand, and people took pride in their work?"
    - Rick Dale

  8. #23
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    Mar 2003
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    I’m very happy with the BFG to-date including in snow last week.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    chances are zero with me

    plus they would be on my 72 GMC as well if they came fat 275 rear 60 x 15 they dont

  10. #25
    as to the reason tires are date coded: Because time and the elements also wear tires out--

    This tire, a Goodyear Marathon trailer tire, is one of 6 holding up our 32' Party Cruiser pontoon boat.
    --It obviously suffered a blowout...
    pcradial2.jpg
    But the unusual thing is, the blowout happened while parked. I took this pic in Sept. 2015, the boat- and tires- were made/sold in 1995. These tires had less than 2000 total miles on them, but simply being 20 years old, age did them in....

    Closeup of the deterioration--
    pcradial3.jpg

    Note that the main reason for the failure was because the steel cords were broken due to extreme sidewall 'squish' that happens to radial tires on multi-axle trailers during hard parking lot turns...
    pcradial4.jpg pcradial5.jpg
    But the bad rubber is why it failed while just sitting parked, couldn't even hold back 50psi of air pressure...
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  11. #26
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    Aug 2005
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    Midwest
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    You might check out the General Altimax rt43 tires. I had a set on an older sedan and they improved the handling but weren't too noisy (though a little louder than the Michelin Defenders I have on another car). They run $30-40 less money than the Michelins IIRC.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev Williams View Post
    as to the reason tires are date coded: Because time and the elements also wear tires out--

    This tire, a Goodyear Marathon trailer tire, is one of 6 holding up our 32' Party Cruiser pontoon boat.
    --It obviously suffered a blowout...
    pcradial2.jpg
    But the unusual thing is, the blowout happened while parked. I took this pic in Sept. 2015, the boat- and tires- were made/sold in 1995. These tires had less than 2000 total miles on them, but simply being 20 years old, age did them in....

    Closeup of the deterioration--
    pcradial3.jpg

    Note that the main reason for the failure was because the steel cords were broken due to extreme sidewall 'squish' that happens to radial tires on multi-axle trailers during hard parking lot turns...
    pcradial4.jpg pcradial5.jpg
    But the bad rubber is why it failed while just sitting parked, couldn't even hold back 50psi of air pressure...
    Exactly! My experience was with 6 year old tires with about the same mileage. First one slung the tread off. Second sounded like a gun shot going down the road. There are doubters on this but just sitting on the shelf they deteriorate. You don't want to put tires on that are already pushing 5 or 6 years since manufacture. It doesn't matter how good the tread is. The carcass can still fail without warning.

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