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Thread: Tool list for Bench crafted Roubo Split top build

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Assaf Oppenheimer View Post
    the split top is built with a removable partition which should lie flush with the top so that when you use it your theoretically not loosing the advantages of a continuous top. when you remove it, you can pull clamps through it to get greater clamping reach from the middle of the top. If you move it, it can rest at a higher step creating a "wall" to use to plane against. Also depending on how you design it, you can use the partition as a tool tray.

    I just finished building my version of this bench, pretty closely following Benchcrafted's plans but using mostly power tools (and some hand tools). I left the center partition sitting just below the surface of the tops to ensure it couldn't possibly interfere when in the "down" position, and that is working very nicely.

    With holdfasts I haven't yet found the need to use clamps through the split, but when the need arises, I'll be happy for it. And, handling the top as two pieces was a BEAST... joined together it would be brutal.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  2. #47
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    Also, to Derek's question about coplanar and split top..

    I followed Marc's (the wood whisperer) approach for setting up rails to carry a router sled for final flattening. Basically, two straight rails are temporarily affixed to the sides of the bench - using two cords from corner to corner and crossing in the middle, coplanar is established. Then the router sled travels on those aligned rails. In my case, the deepest router cut was about 1/16" in one section (but the majority of the cuts were between 1/64" and 1/32") as I took a lot of time along the way to try to ensure precise top and to reduce the effort on this last step.

    I checked all with small winding sticks on each individual split, and then wider winding sticks to check the entire thing as a unit... and also with a precision straight edge endlessly (obsessively). The thing is flat and coplanar, at least flat enough for my skill level at this point in time

    Now, as time goes on, I may need to repeat that exercise in the future... But I'm good at it now, so it will be about a 1 hour event some years from now.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bussey View Post
    Andrew, please give me a couple of days and I will give a short response.
    Take your time Tom. If your wood “St. Peter’s Cross” works, it works. Anybody can come of with a theory of why it shouldn’t, or why Bencrafted’s Crisscross is a superior product, but at the end of the day, it’s all talk. I can, however, understand why you may not want to partake in online debates if you feel your views or ideas are being criticized.
    Last edited by Andrew Nemeth; 03-02-2021 at 11:55 AM. Reason: Spelling error

  4. #49
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    If a few more want to hear about it let me know
    Add me as interested in learning about your wooden Criss Cross.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Add me as interested in learning about your wooden Criss Cross.

    jtk
    Also interested. Not sure I would do it myself, but it seems pretty interesting to learn about.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bussey View Post
    Andrew, please give me a couple of days and I will give a short response. There are a lot of people out there who because they have a Criss Cross form Bench Crafted or what ever will chime in and say their is the only way to go, their way is better, this is how I did it, or it is foolish to make it out of wood. In other wards I am going against the established way and therefor must be made to appear like a fool and I do not want to waist my time.

    If a few more want to hear about it let me know otherwise I it is not worth my time to be made to appear stupid. There are whole chapters written in text books that apply to clamping principals and they are hidden in the criss Cross.

    And as for the others, other than wood which is the same investment I have less than one dollar in my criss cross. and no tap to buy.
    I'm a straight up neophyte to woodworking who is about to order a Benchcrafted package which includes a crisscross. that being said I would love a detailed post on how you build it.
    one of the things I love about this community is most people here seem to agree that there is more than one way to skin a cat. If you built it, and it works then I see no possible way to make you out as stupid or otherwise. Seems to me to do so would say a lot more about the naysayer...

    P.S. until now the only tap I ever wanted gave me beer

  7. #52
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    I bought the guild lessons too, that is what I plan on doing

  8. #53
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    Perhaps you’ve already uncovered the following, but maybe not. Kieran Binnie described his Roubo build in his blog (https://overthewireless.com/2019/01/) and in a series of articles in the Furniture & Cabinetmaking magazine. I enjoyed following along as he worked through the many challenges. Go get ‘em, best of luck.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bussey View Post

    I would make it 4 hands high and about 3 hands wide unless you can work from both sides and your space allows it. And I mean your hands. A hand is the length from the tip of your thumb to the tip of your little finger when your hand is stretched out comfortably. A hand for me is 81/2 inches so the height of the bench is 34 inches. If I really stretch it out it is 35 inches. It has to do with proportions. 3 hands wide is about how far your arm will go to pick something up comfortably. Again it is sizing your bench to fit YOUR body not mine. For me a split top should be no wider than 25 1/2 inches, so 24 works out to be somewhat ideal.

    I looked into what you said, I have adjusted my plans accordingly and the bench now stands at 37" tall. thank you sir!

    I am not sure about extending the top past 24" though, I want to build a tool cabinet to hang on the wall over the bench, I think keeping me far away from the wall will prevent me from getting to tools on a higher shelf.
    Last edited by Assaf Oppenheimer; 03-05-2021 at 7:31 AM.

  10. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Assaf Oppenheimer View Post
    I looked into what you said, I have adjusted my plans accordingly and the bench now stands at 37" tall. thank you sir!

    I am not sure about extending the top past 24" though, I want to build a tool cabinet to hang on the wall over the bench, I think keeping me far away from the wall will prevent me from getting to tools on a higher shelf.
    Andre Roubo recommends 20 to 22 inches wide.

  11. #56
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    For a bench height, HNT Gordon recommends placing a piece of the average stock that you will be planing. Put your most used plane on that piece of stock and grasp the tote. Your forearm should be level with the bench when you are in the correct planing position. Your bench height should be equal to the bottom of the topmost piece of stock. Makes sense to me.

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Putnam View Post
    For a bench height, HNT Gordon recommends placing a piece of the average stock that you will be planing. Put your most used plane on that piece of stock and grasp the tote. Your forearm should be level with the bench when you are in the correct planing position. Your bench height should be equal to the bottom of the topmost piece of stock. Makes sense to me.
    Curt, I agree with this. Some years ago I was writing about pushing a plane handle forward rather than down.

    Note that woodies, such as HNT Gordon, are influenced by Asian designs, and are lower than "traditional" wooden Western planes.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  13. #58
    I agree with both of you, Curt and Derek. I did exactly that. I built up a proto type bench to see what my height should be as well as how the size fit into the room. I even laid out my actual dog holes and everything actual size with a marking knife so there wouldn't be any surprises and I could get a any dimension anytime I needed. If you go this route tape paper to the bench while you work dimensions out. I changed things 3 times I think before I used the knife. I even took the floor mat I would be standing on into account.

    And to my SURPRISE the bench is exactly 4 hands high. 34 1/2 inches high. 34 for the bench height and 1/2 inch for the mat I stand on. And the proto type leg vise was also worked out at that time. Which is i a different post.

    DSC03102.JPG DSC03110.JPG DSC03111.JPG DSC03107.JPG DSC03108.JPG DSC03109.JPG DSC03106.JPG
    Last edited by Tom Bussey; 03-06-2021 at 7:18 AM.
    Tom

  14. #59
    I agree with both of you, Curt and Derek. I did exactly that. I built up a proto type bench to see what my height should be as well as how the size fit into the room. I even laid out my actual dog holes and everything actual size with a marking knife so there wouldn't be any surprises and I could get a any dimension anytime I needed. If you go this route tape paper to the bench while you work dimensions out. I changed things 3 times I think before I used the knife. I even took the floor mat I would be standing on into account.

    And to my SURPRISE the bench is exactly 4 hands high. 34 1/2 inches high. 34 for the bench height ( 4 hand) and 1/2 inch for the mat I stand on. And the proto type leg vise was also worked out at that time, which is earlier in this post or in a different post by me.

    DSC03102.JPG DSC03110.JPG DSC03111.JPG DSC03107.JPG DSC03108.JPG DSC03109.JPG DSC03106.JPG
    Tom

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