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Thread: Can you joint an unevenly cut board?

  1. #1
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    Can you joint an unevenly cut board?

    Like say for example I cut a board on the bandsaw so the cut is a bit wavy. Can I run something like that through the jointer until it takes out all the wavyiness? I was hesitant because I knew it wouldn't feed through smoothly and worried me that it might kickback or something.

  2. #2
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    I do it all the time. In fact some of the rough cut lumber I've bought isn't much better.

  3. #3
    As long as the cut was mostly straight it should be fine. If it has a long gentle curve the jointer may have a tendency of following the curve. I typically use the bandsaw to remove those types of issues prior to edge jointing. For face jointing I typically use a jack plane prior to pull out any obvious twist or bow.
    Last edited by Andrew Seemann; 02-24-2021 at 6:29 PM.

  4. #4
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    If it’s going to take me more than about 8 passes on a long board I use my table saw jointer sled. Then a cleanup pass on the jointer. There are several ways to do it on the TS and several types of clamps that work on it.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=baF11jibRRE

  5. #5
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    Thats pretty much what jointers are for. Some situations call for other solutions and techniques, and jointing a board with a propeller twist can take some skill, but, yes the jointer is, for most people much of the time, the go-to tool for flattening one side of a board.

  6. #6
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    If the side opposite to the side cut on the band saw is flat you can run it through the planer that way the two sides are co-planer.
    George

    Making sawdust regularly, occasionally a project is completed.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    Like say for example I cut a board on the bandsaw so the cut is a bit wavy. Can I run something like that through the jointer until it takes out all the wavyiness? I was hesitant because I knew it wouldn't feed through smoothly and worried me that it might kickback or something.
    Yes, that's what a jointer is for.

    With a jointer, you're the feeder so keep loose clothing tied back, no gloves, use push pads and make sure your guard is in working order.

    Of course grain direction is important as well. I place a horizontal line on the nd of piece, just above where the jointed surface will be after checking grain direction. That's the end that"s furthest away from the cutter when I start jointing. Now when I've completed jointing and go to planing, that's the end that's furthest away from the cutter when I start planing. That keeps me from getting the direction wrong.

    As others have said, if the edge is very crooked, it's more productive to straighten that on the bandsaw before jointing the edge.

    Regards, Rod.
    Last edited by Rod Sheridan; 02-24-2021 at 8:24 AM.

  8. #8
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    That's what jointers are made to do. Particularly if it's only "a bit" wavy - I wouldn't hesitate in the slightest. Length of the board matters, though. Jointers are for relatively long boards. Don't try to correct boards under 16-18" on a jointer. It's easiest to get good results if your board doesn't rock end to end, so if your wavey edge is overall convex, you might consider knocking down the center with plane first, although with a little practice convex boards can be handled without trouble on the jointer. Same is true of face jointing propeller twist out of boards.

    Of course, make sure your blades are sharp and properly set, and never, ever, try to joint end grain.

  9. #9
    I do it all the time but there are limits:

    If the waviness is extreme, you can take too large a bite suddenly and shockingly if your board rocks. So, make sure it rides comfortably flat through the pass.

    Next, bandsaw cuts (in my hands) tend to have the biggest variances near the ends of the board, meaning you can begin or end with a 'point'. If these are the high points, your board may ride flat, but the leading edge can dig in or the trailing edge can bite aggressively and even tear out of there is any run out there.

    All this is to say, do lighter passes, sight down your board, and figure out what you're in for. No willy nilly.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    Like say for example I cut a board on the bandsaw so the cut is a bit wavy. Can I run something like that through the jointer until it takes out all the wavyiness? I was hesitant because I knew it wouldn't feed through smoothly and worried me that it might kickback or something.
    do it all the time on rough sawn lumber that is worse that what you get out of a bandsaw
    That 12" jointer should eat that wood, start out with depth of cut at 1/16" for edge and 1/32" for face. As you get experience set it deeper
    GOOD LUCK
    Ron

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