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Thread: good youtube video series?

  1. #16
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    Many great suggestions here. I'll add Rob Cosman. I've learned some good things from his vids. Lots of sharpening and tool setup content. I'll second the Paul Sellers suggestion. Take a look at Fine Woodworking too. They have a great video library.

    You'll find that YouTube makes short work of figuring you out based on what you watch and will make other suggestions.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  2. #17
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    In addition to Curtis Buchannan, Peter Galbert for all things related to Windsor chairmaking.

  3. #18
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    You will learn a lot more if you spend a day in your shop using the tools and paying attention to what you are doing.

    There are three basic things that you need to understand in woodworking; Wood, Tools and You.

    1. Study wood; read a book on wood structure. Look at different woods, look at it with a microscope or jewelers loope, handle it, feel it, smell it, examine it and describe it in minute detail. Then cut it, bend it, break it, crush it, twist it, split it, slice it stab it, cut it from every direction, soak it in water, dry it out, soak one side. Do everything that you can think of; experiment, observe, analyze, learn.

    2. Tools; only two things that you need to understand here;
    ( 1.) how a chisel cuts wood from different angles in relation to the cell orientation.
    ( 2.) how and why a chipbreaker functions.

    All cutting tools, whether hand or machine tools are simple applications of this knowledge.

    3. You; well now you get to the difficult part. The first two are easy, but this part takes some work; a journey that you will have to take on your own. Good luck.


    Learn these basics of woodworking, then the rest is simply applying them to different jobs.

    It is then about what type of quality you demand of yourself. what effort and value you want to put in. It's about applying your knowledge, developing a system, making a plan and having the patience and discipline to follow it.

    Thoughts to ponder;

    Trust no one, least of all yourself. Your brain lies to you. Test, Check and verify everything.

    The internet is the place to find information, and lots of it, Good and bad, with no way to tell the difference.

  4. #19
    Lie Nielsen has a series of videos on utube. Very good and well documented. On sharpening the best material are still books:
    The Complete Guide to Sharpening and


    The Perfect Edge: The Ultimate Guide to Sharpening for Woodworkers


  5. #20
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    Thanks again guys!! Lots of great info



    Mark - agree with everything you wrote.. just a note, that I do a lot of woodworking already and am deep into the hobby for a bunch of years already... I am just wanting to expand my skills set to include hand tools (whereas, I currently joint, plane, rip, etc. using an electric 8" jointer, electric 12" planer, 3 hp cabinet saw etc.). I still think everything you wrote is spot on, just wanted to make this clarification as additional advice rolls in :-)
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  6. #21
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    Bob, start with something you want to make. Then plan the woodwork the piece requires. Following that plan will take you through a focused use of some but not all hand tools. That will show you where to apply your attention.

    Repeat.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Riefer View Post
    Thanks again guys!! Lots of great info



    Mark - agree with everything you wrote.. just a note, that I do a lot of woodworking already and am deep into the hobby for a bunch of years already... I am just wanting to expand my skills set to include hand tools (whereas, I currently joint, plane, rip, etc. using an electric 8" jointer, electric 12" planer, 3 hp cabinet saw etc.). I still think everything you wrote is spot on, just wanted to make this clarification as additional advice rolls in :-)

    Hi Bob, Glad to hear that you have some background as the internet is a scary place to go in green. I certainly wouldn't want to learn bomb disposal on the internet; you have just as many people telling you to cut the red wire as telling you to cut the black wire.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Jones 5443 View Post
    Bob, start with something you want to make. Then plan the woodwork the piece requires. Following that plan will take you through a focused use of some but not all hand tools. That will show you where to apply your attention.

    Repeat.


    I agree - I've always been of the mindset that learning woodworking while also creating something useful or beautiful is a satisfying way to learn. Not that I haven't done a lot of practice techniques on scrap / pine over the years, but... all practice and no product can get very boring, so I tend to do as you have noted.. pick a project, pick a path to creating it.

    The nuance now, is that there are spots where I can look to insert hand tools more regularly.

    In my latest build (split top roubo) I did use chisels, tenon saw, a rasp, and a block plane... Mostly because I really couldn't think of another way to do some of these tasks. The bench turned out nicely (I think) but boy was I clumsy with those hand tools... some of it technique, some of it because I hadn't nicely sharpened tools etc.

    workbench finished 1.jpg

    So, I want to keep on producing, but reduce the "clumsy factor" and I think all these vids will help me learn. :-)
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hennebury View Post
    Hi Bob, Glad to hear that you have some background as the internet is a scary place to go in green. I certainly wouldn't want to learn bomb disposal on the internet; you have just as many people telling you to cut the red wire as telling you to cut the black wire.

    lol, I damn near cut the red wire I think!!! :-)

    I find necessity allows me to learn more easily. As the story above notes, my recent project had a few steps that were painfully ugly in terms of how I went about doing a task with hand tools. I'd like to enjoy the ride, not simply get to the destination... and the good news in this case is that this is driving my brain to want to gobble up hand tool information finally after all this time.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  10. #25
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    Bob,
    Many good suggestions. Maybe too many to check out. As someone suggested, find one video series that appeals to you and stick with it until you have enough experience to decide you want another approach.
    There was a surprising lack of emphasis on sharpening. The difference between sharp chisels and planes and not-so-sharp chisels and planes is the difference between pleasure and frustration. How sharp is sharp? You will know it when you slice through wood easily and smoothly instead of fighting with it. And sharp tools are safer to use than dull tools because they are much easier to control.
    There are two woodworking schools in Philadelphia that would be worth checking out if you want to take a course.

    Philadelphia Furniture Workshop, 5212 Pulaski Ave., 215-849-5174

    and


    Philadelphia Woodworks, 4901 Umbria St, Philadelphia, PA 19128 267-331-5880

    Both of them are minutes from me. Give me a shout if you have any questions.
    Ron

  11. #26
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    Someone mentioned Phil Lowe passing, and I just spent the past few days watching him teach his wood working skills ,"The Art of WoodWorking", on youtube.

    I like the way he teaches and his work habits. He explains the nuances in using hand tools effectively, and is one heck of a cabinetmaker.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Kanter View Post
    Bob,
    Many good suggestions. Maybe too many to check out. As someone suggested, find one video series that appeals to you and stick with it until you have enough experience to decide you want another approach.
    There was a surprising lack of emphasis on sharpening. The difference between sharp chisels and planes and not-so-sharp chisels and planes is the difference between pleasure and frustration. How sharp is sharp? You will know it when you slice through wood easily and smoothly instead of fighting with it. And sharp tools are safer to use than dull tools because they are much easier to control.
    There are two woodworking schools in Philadelphia that would be worth checking out if you want to take a course.

    Philadelphia Furniture Workshop, 5212 Pulaski Ave., 215-849-5174

    and


    Philadelphia Woodworks, 4901 Umbria St, Philadelphia, PA 19128 267-331-5880

    Both of them are minutes from me. Give me a shout if you have any questions.
    Ron

    Nice, thanks Ron! The consultancy I work for is located by Love Park (16th/Arch) so as covid lifts, I'll be in the city more often and will definitely look to check those out and connect with you too!
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  13. #28
    peter follansbee started posting videos on youtube recently if you're interested in his work.

  14. #29
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    I agree that there are several good suggestions here. I’d suggest you checkout a couple of videos from each and see if one appeals to you more than the other. I didn’t see Tom Fidgen mentioned. He is the author of the Unplugged Woodshop. I’ll bet your local library has a copy. He operates a school in Toronto, Ontario. As a power tool user, do you have a workbench? If not, maybe that would be a good first project to blend power tools with hand tools. Given your kit, the only thing I think you would want to add to do a bench build is a smoother, though a jointer would be useful as well. If you decide to build a bench, you may decide you want to add hold fasts to your kit. In my opinion a decent workbench is one of the most important tools. As you get into hand tools you will discover the benefits of several bench accessories - shooting boards, bench hooks, moxon vises.

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