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Thread: Is It The Bandsaw, The Wood, The Blade or...?

  1. #31
    Would the Superglide be about the same as Boeshield, then?

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by les winter View Post
    Hello Julie. Where did you buy the Supergleit?
    Felder e-Shop
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Unless you are cutting resinous or wet wood, why would stuff build up on a blade? If you are cutting wood of that ilk then, sure, do whatever is needed to keep it clean; otherwise, I don't see the point. Anytime I've tried some such super lube it lasted for what seemed like a seconds.

    If blade lube is needed in clean wood the saw is underpowered.

    John
    The saw is probably underpowered for that blade. If not underpowered, it certainly seems unable to apply sufficient tension for that blade.

    John, I saw in another thread you can't see the images I posted to the thread. Am I right to assume you can't see the two images I posted here? They are pictures I took of the homemade tension gauge I made, before and after applying tension. I'm having some doubts about how I'm reading the dial indicator and was hoping for feedback on that.

    If you couldn't see the pictures, does this work?
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  4. #34
    Might be worth getting two little g-glamps to see if that makes a difference,
    The shop bought gauges have a sharpish point on them, so might be a good idea to drill and insert a bit of rod into the wood for the clamps to press on.

    Good luck
    Tom

  5. #35
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    The manual for the Jet JWBS-18 says it can handle up to 1-1/2" wide blades.
    What the manual says is it will accept up to that wide of a blade. It does not say it will tenison one that size properly. You naturally assumed it would, because that seems reasonable. Welcome to the world of Markerteers. Your disappointment will probably subside.


    I always tension past the gauge on the saw when resawing
    Good practice. Those gauges are merely a reference and not a measure of accuracy.

    And that was my go-to resaw blade for the last 7-8 years. But it's probably dull now.
    um..............if you've been using a blade for that that long - it's dull.


    then there was the pecky Bolivian walnut. That stuff has hardened resin in it that can chip off and get caught in the cut. I thought that may have been the culprit, if in fact the blade is dull.
    Ya think ? It seems rather obvious from afar and not being invested in the outcome.


    I have to admit I'm not all that impressed with the Resaw King
    You're not alone. And there are many that aren't as impressed to the level of hype it receives. Marketers again.


    Based on that number, the PSI is 7,830. Don't know how that translates in the blade's ability to resaw though.
    It's no where near enough for a 1" blade or a resaw king.


    The saw is probably underpowered for that blade. If not underpowered, it certainly seems unable to apply sufficient tension for that blade.
    Seems you've finally reached the conclusion that was given early on in this thread. Expeience really is the best teacher.

    You should be able to get a new and beefier spring for your saw from Louis Iturra. It's still not going to tension a 1"+ carbide blade on your saw, but will be an improvement. You have to call him, he does not deal in cyberspace.


    Iturra Design

    904-642-2802
    Toll Free: 888-722-7078
    4636 Fulton Road
    Jacksonville, Florida 32225-1332

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Only the rear guide bearings have any great impact when resawing, and with enough tension even they aren't needed much.
    John, what is the role of the rear guide when resawing, particularly if the side guides don't engage?

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Hills View Post
    John, what is the role of the rear guide when resawing, particularly if the side guides don't engage?
    It keeps the back of the band from being pushed rearward from the pressure of the cut...that could screw up tracking, etc. It's merely providing support in that respect.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
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    I can see the photo with your tension gage, Julie. It doesn't matter which way the gage moves; all that matters is the difference in the gage reading from zero tension. That being said, your gage length (distance between the clamps) looks to be very small, and your gage only reads to 0.001". Calculating an accurate strain will be a challenge at best. You can interpolate to 0.0005" with that gage but it's still no substitute for starting with a longer gage length. Your saw must have at least 10" of resaw capacity, if I remember correctly that you have resawed some 7 - 8" wide stock, and it's more likely at least 12". If so, make your gage so that it just fits between the table and upper guide at its maximum opening. My gage has a gage length of 12", so every 0.001" of dial movement = 2400 psi tension. I normally run 24 ksi tension on my Woodmaster CT, so I'm looking for 0.010" of gage change when I tension it. If the dial is 0.0005" over or under that target I'm only off by 1200 psi. I would guess the gage length of your meter is on the order of 4", meaning 0.0005" = 3625 psi, which is pretty substantial. It's not going to get your saw from an indicated 10 ksi, for example, to an actual 25 ksi but it's still a large error and easily resolved by making your tension gage as long as possible.

    John

  9. #39
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    Yes, what Jim said. Blade deflection decrease as tension increases. At low tension the rear bearing supports the blade from bending rearward as the wood is fed into the blade. As tension increases the blade will deflect less at the same feed rate so the rear bearing is needed less. And at really high tension on a stout blade, say 30 ksi on a 1-1/2" x 0.042" blade, the rear bearing may never engage except at very high feed rate.

    You can take this a step further and see why the side guides do little to keep a blade cutting straight. At low tension the blade will deflect rearward until the rear bearing supports it. What happens if you feed the wood too fast? The blade will respond by deflecting sideways. The guides will try to support the blade but they offer no help except where they actually touch the blade so if you push too hard the blade will still deflect sideways, giving that bowed cut we all have experienced. But when the tension is high enough the blade will resist deflecting sideways just as it does bending rearward and it will inherently cut straight. At that point the side guides are doing nothing. That's why I earlier said that if you are using the side guides to help the blade cut straight something else is wrong.

    John

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rainey View Post
    Glenn, do they still make a 1/2 Resaw King? I have not see that available. Did they stop making them?
    I do not see them anymore either. Too bad as I have pretty much walked away from wider blades as the cost more but cut no better on my saws.
    I always forget . . . Is it the letter "S" or the letter "C" that is silent in the word scent?
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie Moriarty View Post

    We'll see how well this works on longer pieces later...
    Sounds like you have it resolved. Kudos.
    I always forget . . . Is it the letter "S" or the letter "C" that is silent in the word scent?
    - Glenn (the second "N" is silent) Bradley

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    You should be able to get a new and beefier spring for your saw from Louis Iturra. It's still not going to tension a 1"+ carbide blade on your saw, but will be an improvement.
    I've thought about installing a beefier spring but then isn't that rolling the dice? Not so much as to how effective it will be in applying tension, but isn't there a chance of exceeding the tension the bandsaw frame can handle?

    The best blade for resaw so far has been the Woodmaster CT. They don't make it in anything less than 1" wide but it handled this pile of 8/4 sapele resawed down to 1/2" easily.




    Considering the cost is almost half the Resaw King and considering how long it lasted, I'll stick with the Woodmaster CT for now. I'm ordering a second one so when the other is in for resharpening there won't be any down time.

    Thank you all for your help. I truly appreciate it.

    Julie
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  13. #43
    You would know the spring is too 'heavy' if, as you apply tension, the spring stops compressing. If you continue to increase the tension, it would imply the frame is bending - detectable or not. On the other end, a spring is too weak if it fully compresses (to it's 'stack height'), before you get sufficient tension.

  14. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    You would know the spring is too 'heavy' if, as you apply tension, the spring stops compressing. If you continue to increase the tension, it would imply the frame is bending - detectable or not. On the other end, a spring is too weak if it fully compresses (to it's 'stack height'), before you get sufficient tension.
    Nothing welding a few struts on couldn't solve,
    Haven't seen it done before, but it would be cheap and easy to do I imagine.
    Tom

  15. #45
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    Originally Posted by Mark Rainey View Post
    Glenn, do they still make a 1/2 Resaw King? I have not see that available. Did they stop making them?
    =glenn bradley;3102255]I do not see them anymore either. Too bad as I have pretty much walked away from wider blades as the cost more but cut no better on my saws.
    Toolcenter.com lists Trimaster blades 1/2" X .025" X 111" so pretty thin and should be easier to tension. $160 so not cheap but Trimasters are like that I'm told. They also have DieMaster 2 $43.67 and very reasonable shipping. Trimaster is 3 TPI, DieMaster 2 is 4 TPI.

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